A Novice’s Entry Into The World of Macrophotography Dave Stone University Laboratory High School Urbana, IL - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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A Novice’s Entry Into The World of Macrophotography Dave Stone University Laboratory High School Urbana, IL
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A Novice’s Entry Into The World of Macrophotography Dave Stone University Laboratory High School Urbana, IL

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  1. A Novice’s Entry Into The World of Macrophotography Dave Stone University Laboratory High School Urbana, IL

  2. What is macrophotography? Macrophotography is close-up photography of small objects or small parts of large objects. Macrophotographyallows the user to see things that are too small or occur too rapidly to be readily seen using the naked eye.

  3. What is macrophotography? Macrophotography is close-up photography of small objects or small parts of large objects. Macrophotographyallows the user to see things that are too small or occur too rapidly to be readily seen using the naked eye.

  4. Past Image-related Involvement Video-based Used to slow movements of myself and my dogs in agility training

  5. Key Areas of Focus My timing My body movements My footwork My cues Dog’s timing Dog’s body movement Dog’s footwork Dog’s cues

  6. Training Video Video played from my computer, though it can be accessed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKUS5RIfr-E&feature=PlayList&p=59D88AE42334D656&index=2

  7. Macrophotography: A lens for seeing structure and behavior

  8. Macrophotography Workshop (June, 2009) Alex Wild • Nature Photographer • Postdoc in Entomology • Myrmecos Photo by Alex Wild

  9. Some General Questions Do you need a DSLR for excellent macrophotographs? No, there are many very nice, very versatile compact digital cameras available, though shutter lag can be an issue. Do you need a macro lens for excellent macrophotographs? No, macro mode on most digital cameras works well. Are there options other than purchasing a dedicated macro lens? Yes, they include close-up filters (which work as a magnifying glass) or reversing a lens [best if you use a prime (non-zoom lens)] with a reversing ring.

  10. Some General Questions Do you need a DSLR for excellent macrophotographs? No, there are many very nice, very versatile compact digital cameras available, though shutter lag can be an issue. Do you need a macro lens for excellent macrophotographs? No, macro mode on most digital cameras works well. Are there options other than purchasing a dedicated macro lens? Yes, they include close-up filters (which work as a magnifying glass) or reversing a lens [best if you use a prime (non-zoom lens)] with a reversing ring.

  11. Some General Questions Do you need a DSLR for excellent macrophotographs? No, there are many very nice, very versatile compact digital cameras available, though shutter lag can be an issue. Do you need a macro lens for excellent macrophotographs? No, macro mode on most digital cameras works well. Are there options other than purchasing a dedicated macro lens? Yes, they include close-up filters (which work as a magnifying glass) or reversing a lens [best if you use a prime (non-zoom lens)] with a reversing ring.

  12. So, why buy a macro lens? Macro lenses excel in sharpness across the entire image, contrast and overall photo quality.

  13. Summer of Photography(Summer, 2009) Lots of Arthropod-related Projects BeeSpace Reading Technique

  14. Summer of Photography(Summer, 2009) Reading Books

  15. Summer of Photography(Summer, 2009) Reading Blogs Alex Wild’s “Myrmecos” Ted MacRae’s “Beetles in the Bush”

  16. Summer of Photography(Summer, 2009) Technique Equipment Nikon D50 60mm Nikkor Macro lens

  17. Challenge #1 Lens practically touches whatever you are photographing Often 2” to 3” from specimen

  18. Challenge #2 Razor thin depth of field

  19. Challenge #3 Lens interference with onboard flash

  20. Challenge #4 Photographing nocturnal activities

  21. Time is of the Essence Being in the field at the right time is key. Mornings are times of less activity. Late AM and early PM hours are times of high activity. Different bloom times allow you access to different pollinators and predators. Spring and Fall – Best in the wooded areas Summer – U of I Arboretum, 1st and Windsor

  22. Time is of the Essence Being in the field at the right time is key. Mornings are times of less activity. Late AM and early PM hours are times of high activity. Different bloom times allow you access to different pollinators and predators. Spring and Fall – Best in the wooded areas Summer – U of I Arboretum, 1st and Windsor

  23. My First Rule No baiting, no chilling, no stunning, no killing.

  24. Rules for Photographing Arthropods • Move slowly. • Find a spot that appeals to you and wait. • Moist areas always have largest diversity. • Utilize knowledge of arthropod senses and behaviors. Look for shadows on the underside of leaves . Never get between an arthropod and the sun. Take advantage of territoriality. Take advantage of vision differences. • Use the whole of the frame to tell your story. • Contrasting and bright background colors are key in many of the best images.

  25. Rules for Photographing Arthropods • Move slowly. • Find a spot that appeals to you and wait. • Moist areas always have largest diversity. • Utilize knowledge of arthropod senses and behaviors. Look for shadows on the underside of leaves . Never get between an arthropod and the sun. Take advantage of territoriality. Take advantage of vision differences. • Use the whole of the frame to tell your story. • Contrasting and bright background colors are key in many of the best images.

  26. Rules for Photographing Arthropods • Move slowly. • Find a spot that appeals to you and wait. • Moist areas always have largest diversity. • Utilize knowledge of arthropod senses and behaviors. Look for shadows on the underside of leaves . Never get between an arthropod and the sun. Take advantage of territoriality. Take advantage of vision differences. • Use the whole of the frame to tell your story. • Contrasting and bright background colors are key in many of the best images.

  27. Rules for Photographing Arthropods • Move slowly. • Find a spot that appeals to you and wait. • Moist areas always have largest diversity. • Utilize knowledge of arthropod senses and behaviors. Look for shadows on the underside of leaves. Never get between an arthropod and the sun. Take advantage of territoriality. Take advantage of vision differences. • Use the whole of the frame to tell your story. • Contrasting and bright background colors are key in many of the best images.

  28. Rules for Photographing Arthropods • Move slowly. • Find a spot that appeals to you and wait. • Moist areas always have largest diversity. • Utilize knowledge of arthropod senses and behaviors. Look for shadows on the underside of leaves . Never get between an arthropod and the sun. Take advantage of territoriality. Take advantage of vision differences. • Use the whole of the frame to tell your story. • Contrasting and bright background colors are key in many of the best images.

  29. Rules for Photographing Arthropods • Move slowly. • Find a spot that appeals to you and wait. • Moist areas always have largest diversity. • Utilize knowledge of arthropod senses and behaviors. Look for shadows on the underside of leaves . Never get between an arthropod and the sun. Take advantage of territoriality. Take advantage of vision differences. • Use the whole of the frame to tell your story. • Contrasting and bright background colors are key in many of the best images.

  30. Champaign County Camera Club (Fall, 2009) Became part of a local community of photographers Introduced me to critique Introduced me to improving my technique and images through competitions

  31. PSA International Competitions Entomological Society of America 2010 National Insect Salon

  32. PSA’s Seven Divisions Color Projected Image Electronic Imaging Nature Photojournalism Photo Travel Pictorial Print 3D Each division offers an information center, study groups, division memberships, and competitions.

  33. PSA Star Ratings: Nature The Nature Star Rating system was initiated to provide recognition for proficiency in international nature exhibitions. All acceptances must be in PSA recognized nature exhibitions.

  34. Book Recommendation

  35. 2011 PSA Competitions Ridgewood Camera Club Entomological Society of America North Central Branch Saguaro International Nature Exhibition Fresno International Exhibition Great Lakes Digital Salon Mississippi Valley Camera Club

  36. Do Your Homework • Establish categories (e.g. Nature – Open vs. Nature – Wildlife). • Look for special designation awards (e.g. organisms under 1 cm in length). • Look through postings of past year’s accepted images. • Select images based on background of judges.

  37. Various Nature Categories Nature – Open No human elements, domestic species, or modifications other than cropping and global changes. Nature – Wildlife See Nature – Open above. Organisms must be photographed in their natural environment. No zoo, game farm or landscape images.

  38. Special Designation Awards Best example – “Organisms under 1 cm in length” award offered by the Entomological Society of America North Central Branch Encourages photographers to photograph a subset of organisms they would not normally photograph

  39. Non-PSA Competitions Invertebrates in Education and Conservation Conference, Tucson, AZ Four days of morning presentations and Sonoran Desert afternoon/ evening field work Hosts a photo competition judged by conference participants (academic institutions, museums, zoos and aquaria, captive breeding program directors, authors of the major arthropod field guides). Participants focus more on detail and difficulty of getting the shot.

  40. Realizations After My FirstYear of Competitions

  41. Most Successful Images My most successful images have been those 1) with strong detail,2) a good contrasting background, and 3) show an action such as predation, courtship or mating.

  42. Most Successful Images My most successful images have been those 1) with strong detail, 2) a good contrasting background,and 3) show an action such as predation, courtship or mating.

  43. Most Successful Images My most successful images have been those 1) with strong detail, 2) a good contrasting background, and 3) show an action such as predation,courtship or mating.

  44. Most Successful Images My most successful images have been those 1) with strong detail, 2) a good contrasting background, and 3) show an action such as predation, courtship or mating.

  45. Storing Images During Michael Jeffords presentation last year he stated that he had thousands of slides to organize. I realized that I had to plan how to organize my images AND I wanted them to be available to others. This led to creation of Things Biological (http://thingsbiological.wordpress.com/).

  46. Origin of “Things Biological ” Video played from my computer, though it can be accessed at https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/stone2/uiwp/video.html

  47. WordPress as a Means of Sharing Your Work Allows for storage of a vast number of images Intuitive Interface Easily customizable to your needs Built in search function Allows you to easily link to online resources and videos

  48. Nature Blog Network “A nexus for the very best nature blogs on the net. If you're looking for outstanding blogging about birds, bugs, plants, herps, hiking, oceans, ecosystems, or any other natural topic - or if you blog on those topics yourself – this is the place for you!”

  49. So, what have I learned that can be of value to others?

  50. Three macro lens ranges are commonly available 50-60mm lenses are best for handheld shots and stationary objects. Require the shortest working distance 15.0 oz. (425 g) $375 - $475 My preference