The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet

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  1. The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Quotes to know…

  2. “I do but keep the peace: put up thy swordOr manage it to part these men with me.”

  3. “I do but keep the peace: put up thy swordOr manage it to part these men with me.” -Benvolio, I.i.60-61

  4. “O, where is Romeo?-saw you him to-day?-Right glad I am that he was not at this fray.”

  5. “O, where is Romeo?-saw you him to-day?-Right glad I am that he was not at this fray.” Lady Montague, I.i.108-109

  6. “Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:-Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O anything of nothing first create!”

  7. “Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:-Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O anything of nothing first create!” Romeo, I.i.167-169

  8. “By giving liberty unto thine eyes;Examine other beauties.”

  9. “By giving liberty unto thine eyes;Examine other beauties.” Benvolio, I.i.219-220

  10. “Oh teach me how I should forget to think.”

  11. “Oh teach me how I should forget to think.” Romeo, I.i.218

  12. “I’ll look to like if looking liking move:But no more deep will I endart mine eyeThan your consent gives strength to make it fly.”

  13. “I’ll look to like if looking liking move:But no more deep will I endart mine eyeThan your consent gives strength to make it fly.” Juliet, I.iii.97-99

  14. “A man, young lady! Lady, such a manAs all the world—why he is a man of wax.”

  15. “A man, young lady! Lady, such a manAs all the world—why he is a man of wax.” Nurse, I.iii.75-76

  16. “I’ll look to like if looking liking move:But no more deep will I endart mine eyeThan your consent gives strength to make it fly.”

  17. “I’ll look to like if looking liking move:But no more deep will I endart mine eyeThan your consent gives strength to make it fly.” Juliet, I.iii.97-99

  18. “You are a lover; borrow Cupid’s wings,And soar with them above a common bound.”

  19. “You are a lover; borrow Cupid’s wings,And soar with them above a common bound.” Mercutio, I.iv.17-18

  20. “It seems she hangs upon the cheek of nightLike a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear;Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!”

  21. “It seems she hangs upon the cheek of nightLike a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear;Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!” Romeo, I.v.42-45

  22. “I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall,Now seeming sweet, convert to bitter gall.”

  23. “I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall,Now seeming sweet, convert to bitter gall.” Tybalt, I.v. 89-91

  24. “See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!O I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek!”

  25. “See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!O I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek!” Romeo, II.ii.23-25

  26. “What’s in a name? that which we call a roseBy any other name would smell as sweet;”

  27. “What’s in a name? that which we call a roseBy any other name would smell as sweet;” Juliet, II.ii.43-44

  28. “With loves light wings did I o’erperch these walls;”

  29. “With loves light wings did I o’erperch these walls” Romeo, II.ii.66

  30. “Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face;Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheekFor that which thou has heard me speak to-night.”

  31. “Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face;Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheekFor that which thou has heard me speak to-night.” Juliet, II.ii.85-87

  32. “Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.”

  33. “Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.” Juliet, II.ii.185

  34. “Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied;And vice sometimes by action dignified.Within the infant rind of this small flowerPoison hath residence, and medicine power;For this being smelt, with that part cheers each part;Being tasted slays all senses with the heart.”

  35. “Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied;And vice sometimes by action dignified.Within the infant rind of this small flowerPoison hath residence, and medicine power;For this being smelt, with that part cheers each part;Being tasted slays all senses with the heart.” Friar, II.iii.21-26

  36. “Be plain, good son, and homely in thy drift;Riddling confession finds but riddling shrift.”

  37. “Be plain, good son, and homely in thy drift;Riddling confession finds but riddling shrift.” Friar, II.iii.55-56

  38. “I pray thee chide me not: she whom I love nowDoth grace for grace and love for love allow”

  39. “I pray thee chide me not: she whom I love nowDoth grace for grace and love for love allow” Romeo, II.iii.85-86

  40. “More than the prince of cats, I can tell you.”

  41. “More than the prince of cats, I can tell you.” Mercutio, II.iv.18

  42. “A gentleman, nurse that loves to hear himself talk; andwill speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.”

  43. “A gentleman, nurse that loves to hear himself talk; andwill speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.” Romeo, II.iv.134-135

  44. “…if ye should lead her into a fool’s paradise, as they say…”

  45. “…if ye should lead her into a fool’s paradise, as they say…” Nurse, II.iv.148-149

  46. “These violent delights have violent ends.”

  47. “These violent delights have violent ends.” Friar, II.vi.9

  48. “Thou would quarrel with a man forcracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hasthazel eyes…”

  49. “Thou would quarrel with a man forcracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hasthazel eyes…” Mercutio, III.i.19-20

  50. “I do protest I never injur’d thee;But love thee better than thou canst devise”