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Adjunct Faculty Mini Grant Program Central Region 8
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  1. Adjunct Faculty Mini Grant ProgramCentral Region 8

  2. Team Presenters • Michelle K. Miller, M.S. (Coordinator) • Robert McElroy, M.A. (Co-presenter-History) • David Weir, M.A., M.P.A. (Co-presenter-Political Science) • Dan Geraci, M.S. (Co-presenter-Economics) • Anthony L. Conley, M.A. (Co-presenter- History)

  3. Overview of the Mini Grant Program • Goals and Program Process • Fund Start-up Initiatives • Improve Teaching and Learning • Strengthen Professional Development Opportunities for Adjunct Faculty • Committee Approval Process • Areas of Opportunity • Develop Supplemental Learning Materials • Develop & Design of Workshop Topics • New Instructional Technologies • Graduate Research Study (Dissertation) ENHANCE TEACHING EXCELLENCE & QUALITY OF LEARNING

  4. Overview of the Mini Grant Program • Requirements of Program • Must submit Letter of Intent • Must attend “Getting Started Writing A Mini Grant” Workshop • Submit a complete proposal in alignment with the strategic goals • Eligible to receive 1 mini-grant per semester • Written report(s) and/or presentation is required as an outcome of each award • Half of approved amount is received upon award and the remaining amount upon completion

  5. Overview of the Mini Grant Program • Requirements of Program • All products (materials, curriculum, etc.) become the property of Ivy Tech Community College • Recognition is given to the author • Maximum funding is up to $1,000 • Itemized statement of expenses is required and unused funds must be returned to the college ~Positive Energy + Vision = Innovation~ Secret Formula

  6. Results of the Mini Grant Program

  7. Collaborative Blended Learning Model ModernHistory of Political Economy

  8. Learning Objectives & Content Areas from Courses of Record YearHistoryEconomicsPolitical Science World War I, U.S. as a World Power, U.S. in Global Affairs Fiscal Policy, Describe the financial institutions of the economy Describe & Discuss Foundation of the League of Nations 1945 1930 1919 Roaring Twenties, Expanding Role of Gov,t. in American Society Monetary Policy, Federal Reserve System, Inflation, Deflation, Interest Rates Public Policy,Reasons for the New Deal,Democracy in Action World War II, U.S. as a World Power, U.S. in Global Affairs Alternative measures of macroeconomic performance History & Theories of Government & Economic Systems, Communism Flow of Topics Through The Course

  9. Classroom Activities YearHistoryEconomicsPolitical Science Versailles Treaty (1919)(Rewrite The Treaty) Re-Map Flows of Reparations & War Debt (1920s) Wilson Gets Congress To Support The Treaty & The League of Nations (1920) 1945 1930 1919 Roaring Twenties, Stock Market Crash (1929) and Great Depression Economics of the Crash (Stock Market Simulation, Guest Speaker) In FDR’s Shoes (1930s). How Do I Pass & Implement New Deal Legislation? Debate On The Decision To Drop The Atomic Bomb (1945) Post-War Economics, Growth of The Military-Industrial Complex (1950s) Communism, Capitalism, U.S. As The “World Policeman” Flow of Topics Through The Course

  10. What was the Great Depression really like? "It is my contention that no one should be allowed to write about FDR who did not experience that era. It really is one of those cases of you had to be there. Roosevelt may be a myth...today, but 60 years ago that myth looked more like hope. In his fireside chats, he turned our Philco radios into shrines, and when he said that America could not afford to live with one-third of a nation ill-housed and ill-fed, we thought he would do something about it. And he did." Sources: (Photo) University of Auckland Library. (2006). Family gathered around the radio. Retrieved from http://www.library.auckland.ac.nz/subjects/socio/course-pages/sociology222.htm on January 4, 2007. (Quote). Schulz, Stanley. (1999). American History 102: Civil War to the Present. University of Wisconsin. Retrieved from http://us.history.wisc.edu/hist102/lectures/lecture19.html on January 4, 2007.

  11. What was the Great Depression really like?

  12. The Economic Depths of the Great Depression Source: Babson, Roger W. (1940). Business Barometers and Investment. New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, U.S. Chart 1871-1941.

  13. Public Policy In Action The NRA Blue Eagle: Symbol of the New Deal Program, the National Industrial Recovery Act. President Franklin Roosevelt’s First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1933. Sources: (Photo and Sound File of Franklin Roosevelt): Eidenmuller, Michael E. (2001). Franklin Delano Roosevelt: First Inaugural Address. American Rhetoric Top 100 Speeches. Retrieved from http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/fdrfirstinaugural.html on April 13, 2007. (NRA Eagle): Wikipedia. (2007). Blue Eagle. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:NewDealNRA.jpg on April 13, 2007.

  14. Results of Public Policy

  15. Fall 2006 & Early Responses for Spring 2007 Survey Results Methods of Advertising Spring 2007 Semester Fall 2006 Semester

  16. Fall 2006 & Early Responses for Spring 2007 Survey Results Experience in Writing Proposals Spring 2007 Semester Fall 2006 Semester

  17. Fall 2006 & Early Responses for Spring 2007 Survey Results Processed Outlined Clearly Fall 2006 Semester Spring 2007 Semester

  18. Wrap Up Questions/Answers • Changes to Survey • Early results from Spring 2007 in comparison to the Fall 2006 semester indicate disparities among demographics of age, gender, education and length of teaching. • Add areas of discipline • Changes to Program • Early results from Spring 2007 in comparison to the Fall 2006 semesters indicate that program chair(s) are communicating, limited experience in writing proposals and understanding of program requirements. • Add {Writing Clear and Concise Mini Grant Proposals- Module 2 Workshop}.