achievements of the supergen dosh 2 project n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Achievements of the SuperGen DoSH 2 Project PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Achievements of the SuperGen DoSH 2 Project

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Achievements of the SuperGen DoSH 2 Project - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 129 Views
  • Uploaded on

John TS Irvine. Birmingham 18/10/11. Achievements of the SuperGen DoSH 2 Project. Hydrogen Production. Current Hydrogen Production. Energy Devolution. 12 Universities £5M 71 man-years 6 PhD Students and 500 researcher months . WP1 H 2 from carbonaceous sources Ian Metcalfe.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Achievements of the SuperGen DoSH 2 Project' - jonah


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
achievements of the supergen dosh 2 project

John TS Irvine

Birmingham

18/10/11

Achievements of the SuperGen DoSH2 Project

slide5

12 Universities £5M 71 man-years

6 PhD Students and 500 researcher months

wp1 h 2 from carbonaceous sources ian metcalfe
WP1

H2 from carbonaceous sources

Ian Metcalfe

Combined reaction and separation using:

  • Membranes
  • Periodic reactor operation
slide7

Perovskite oxygen carriers for hydrogen production from two processes

water-gas-shift

steam reforming of methane

CO + H2O

CO2 + H2

CH4 + H2O

CO + 3H2

chemical looping

membrane operation

periodic reduction/oxidation steps

continuous process

CO

gas feeds and products separated in time

gas feeds and products separated in space

CO2

H2O ⇆ O+ H2

H2O

H2

ABO3-d

O2-

CH4

Syngas

redox

cycling

ABO3

hollow fibre membrane

  • Advantages of both processes:
  • feed gases do not mix
  • high purity H2 possible
  • no down stream separation required

x-section

H2

H2O

slide8

CO + H2O

CO2 + H2

membrane operation

CH4 + H2O

chemical looping

CO + 3H2

850oC

900oC

background levels of CO and CO2

Example results: Products as a function of cycle number. Plotted are the products from the water-splitting phase. High purity hydrogen is produced. We have done over 170 cycles, the most reported to date.

Example results: Products as a function of time. Plotted together are the products from the water-splitting side and the methane oxidation side. Syngas and hydrogen are produced; overall we have steam reforming. Continuous operation for over 400 hours is the longest reported to date for this process.

slide9

Low Temperature Plasma-Catalysis for Hydrogen Production from Methane

Researchers in Manchester have developed a novel and promising technology – plasma-catalysis, for highly-efficient conversion of methane (in the form of biogas or landfill gas) into hydrogen and other value-added chemicals (carbon nanomaterials, oxygenates, etc). This process combines the advantages of fast and low temperature reaction from nonthermal plasma and high selectivity from catalysis. The physical and chemical interactions between the plasma and catalyst can generate a synergistic effect, which provides a unique way to separate the activation steps from the selective reactions at low temperatures. Plasma can also reduce and activate supported metal catalysts, enhancing metal dispersion on the catalyst surface and catalyst stability, which opens a new route for catalyst treatment at low temperatures.

slide10

Warwick (Martin Wills)

Staff key: PDRA David Morris: DJM

PhD Tarn Johnson: TCJ

WP 1.1 (Formation of hydrogen from alcohols) – work by TCJ.

(i) The application of iron-based cyclone catalysts to the synthesis of methanol, ethanol and isopropanol from large alcohols commonly found in biomass.

Catalysts below:

Used in oxidation of alcohols (below):

and for alcohol formylation (right):

Catalysts below:

Used in asymmetric reduction of ketones:

(ii) Encapsulation of catalysts in a PIM membrane, and is testing in hydrogen transfer; open to return to in future (Cardiff/Warwick collaboration).

(iii) Synthesis of di-iron complexes for electrochemical hydrogen generation; subject of ongoing studies with Prof P. R. Unwin (Warwick).

slide11

Warwick (Martin Wills)

Staff key: PDRA David Morris: DJM

PhD Tarn Johnson: TCJ

WP 1.1 (Formation of hydrogen from alcohols) – work by DJM.

Formation of hydrogen from alcohols using light-promoted process on inorganic support.

Hydrogen gas measurement by gas chromatography. Good progress has been made towards a synthetic catalysis system, as shown below:

DJM has now left the HDel project to take up a position elsewhere; this work will be continued when a second PDRA is appointed at Warwick.

slide12

Amine-containing Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIMs)

Mariolino Carta, Neil B. McKeown, Cardiff University (Chemistry).

PIMs provide microporous materials due to the rigid and contorted structure of the polymer.

We have found that Tröger’s base (TB) formation can be used as a polymerisation reaction starting from an aromatic diamine. This is a new way of making polymers (although the reaction was first reported in 1887).

For example:

  • The above TB-PIM combines:
  • High molecular mass (Mw >100,000 g mol-1 by GPC)
  • Solubility in common solvents (e.g. chloroform, THF) and good film formation.
  • High apparent surface area (BET = 1000 m2 g-1)
  • Particularly selective for H2 in mixture of H2/N2 or H2/CH4
  • (Note: data lie above Robeson upper bound in plots of permeability vs selectivity)

Two patent applications submitted (15/09/11)and now entering PCT phase.

slide13

SUPERGEN DOSH2:Delivery of Sustainable Hydrogen

Hydrogen from Biomass and Waste

From Ethanol

slide14

SUPERGEN DOSH2:Delivery of Sustainable Hydrogen

Membranes and Separation

Ceramic

Metal

wp 2 h 2 from electrons john irvine
WP 2

H2 from electrons

John Irvine

slide16

Current-voltage (I-V) (2-electrode)

47% H2O / 53% N2 |900 °C |Conditioning: - 1.7 V, 2-5 min | Start potential: - 1.7 V | End potential: - 0.4 V | Scan rate: 10 mV s-1

La0.4Sr0.4TiO3

La0.4Sr0.4Ni0.06Ti0.94O2.94

La0.4Sr0.4Fe0.06Ti0.94O2.97

  • B-site doping acted to significantly lower the steam electrolysis onset potential
slide17

Current-voltage (I-V) (2-electrode)

47% H2O / 53% N2 |900 °C |Conditioning: - 1.7 V, 2-5 min | Start potential: - 1.7 V | End potential: - 0.4 V | Scan rate: 10 mV s-1

La0.4Sr0.4TiO3

La0.4Sr0.4Ni0.06Ti0.94O2.94

La0.4Sr0.4Fe0.06Ti0.94O2.97

  • B-site doping acted to significantly lower the steam electrolysis onset potential
slide18

Polarization for CO2 electrolysis at 900oC

0.706 V

0.849 V

0.169 V

  • 1 wt% Pd-GDC co-impregnated LSCM cathode
slide20

SUPERGEN DOSH2:Delivery of Sustainable Hydrogen

Ammonia

Production

Sociotechnical aspects

wp 3 sociotechnical economics malcolm eames
WP 3

Sociotechnical economics

Malcolm Eames

icept techno economic analysis overview of research outputs to date
ICEPT Techno-economic analysisOverview of research outputs to date
  • Demand analysis of H2 as transport fuel
  • “Battery electric vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Which will be the winner?” Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4 (10), 3754 – 3772
  • “An analysis of the market for H2 fuel cell urban buses”, In preparation
  • London case study – H2 from waste
  • “Assessing the role of H2 from waste in developing sustainable H2 infrastructures: a London case study” In preparation
  • H2 for energy storage and UK-wide infrastructure
  • “The role of large scale storage in a GB low carbon energy future: issues and policy challenges” Energy Policy 39 (2011) 4807–4815
  • “H2from biomass: spatially explicit modelling can improve infrastructure decision-making” Submitted to Int J Hydrogen Energy
key themes going forward
Key Themes going forward

Energy Storage to address intermittency

  • Hydrogen can extend use of renewable or even nuclear electricity through storage. Excess power could be utilised for transport or chemicals moving renewable electricity to equally important sectors for CO2 reduction, i.e. transport and chemicals.

Hydrogen for transport

  • Hydrogen/fuel cell vehicles are a type of electric transport closely linked with batteries. They offer range extension, long distance vehicles and greater payload. This can offer decentralised, largely self-contained energy systems with enhanced security.

Hydrogen in CO2 Capture

  • Converting hydrocarbons to H2 and CO2 or rather than sequestering CO2, hydrogen can be utilised to capture CO2 to produce chemical feedstocks, fertilisers or liquid fuels.