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Fun PowerPoint Presentation

Fun

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Fun

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  1. Transportation 30% Money Self-Esteem 36% 30% 1. Benefits 4. Barriers Physical Benefits Time 23% 7% Fun 8% Did Not Answer Ski Enough + 4% Other 27% Other Confidence 8% 19% All of the Above 8% 2. Learning Environment 5. Feelings Very Proud That I Can Ski 79% Safe + Fun + Educational 70% OK / No Difference Good That I Can Ski 0% 21% Safe + Fun 11% Other 13% Fun 6% 3. Outcomes 6. Other Physical Activities Fun 30% Self Confidence 21% Yes 89% Compassion 4% Learning Experience 7% Other 9% Maybe Independence 11% Exercise / Health Benefit No 20% 0% 9% Public Participation in Service Learning Programs for Disabled Persons: Results of a Survey Pauline J. Kelzer, DrPH (Dept. of Nursing and Health Sciences), and Mary-Ellen Pratt, BS, Graduate Program in Health Care Administration (Dept. of Public Administration), California State University, Hayward INTRODUCTION: A community service learning project was conducted between California State University Hayward (CSUH), and Tahoe Adaptive Ski School (TASS), a division of Disabled Sports, USA Far West (DSUSAFW). The project was a client survey which produced useful data for the non-profit organization and for the university. This poster summarizes findings from the survey, and demonstrates benefits of a community service learning partnership. The data were used for program review and grant proposals. • SELECTED FINDINGS: (See Charts) • Generally Disabled Persons • 1. BENEFITSThe benefits of adaptive skiing are both physical and psychological, reflected in feelings of self-confidence and levels of self-esteem. (Kelzer and Pratt, 1999; Rimmer, 1998, Engel, et.al., 1997) • 2. LEARNING ENVIRONMENTThe physical activity of skiing is important, and instructors provide a supportive learning environment that is safe, fun, and educational. • OUTCOMES Respondents identified “fun” as the most significant aspect derived from adaptive skiing, and gave it primary importance. “Self-confidence” and “independence” were also identified as important. • Developmentally Disabled Persons • BARRIERS Access to adaptive skiing is still too limited for developmentally disabled persons. The barriers of money and transportation are key access issues. • FEELINGSRespondents’ positive answers reflectedhigh levels of confidence and satisfaction, with a related boost to pride and self-image in being able to ski. (Biddle, 1995) • OTHER PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES Respondents overwhelmingly reported an interest in programexpansion, as well as participating in other physical activities.http://www.nac1985.org • CONCLUSIONS:a) Community service learning projects can achieve multiple goals including public participation, program evaluation, client satisfaction, and research data. b) Both generally and developmentally disabled clients benefit from physical activity and show a strong interest in participation. (Rimmer, Braddock, Pitetti, 1996 and Rimmer, 1999) c) Access barriers are perceived by both groups of disabled persons; programs must address access issues. d) Confidence in one activity (adaptive skiing) spreads to other activities and contributes to independence. This confidence is reflected in the motto of DSUSA: “If I can do this, I can do anything!” http://www.dsusafw.org • Presented at 130th Annual Meeting, American Public Health Association, Philadelphia, PA, November, 2002. • Grant support provided by Mary D’Alleva, Director, CSUH Office of Service Learning. • Technical support provided by Bonnie Correia, CSUH Media and Technology Services.