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1999 California Healthy Eating and Exercise Practices Survey: Programmatic Implications for the California Children’s 5 a Day–Power Play! Campaign. Authors: Angie Keihner 1 , Tanya Garbolino 1 , Mark Hudes 2 1 Public Health Institute, 2 University of California, Berkeley.

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slide1

1999 California Healthy Eating and Exercise Practices Survey: Programmatic Implications for the

California Children’s

5 a Day–Power Play! Campaign

Authors:

Angie Keihner1, Tanya Garbolino1, Mark Hudes2

1 Public Health Institute, 2 University of California, Berkeley

diet and exercise
Only 1% of children eat a diet consistent with federal nutrition recommendations (1989-1991 CSFII).1

Fewer than half of California children meet the 60 minute PA recommendation, and 14% get fewer than 30 minutes of PA a day.2

Diet and Exercise

1 Munoz K, et al., Food Intakes of U.S. Children and Adolescents Compared with Recommendations. Pediatrics, 1997. 100(3): p. 323 - 329.

2 California Department of Health Services, 1999 California Children's Healthy Eating and Exercise Practices Survey: Unpublished data. In press: Sacramento, CA.

marketing to children
In 1997, U.S. children spent $7.7 billion on foods and beverages

Ranked first among expenditures

Accounted for one-third of the total $23.4 billion spent

Marketing to Children

McNeal JU. The kids market: Myths and realities. Ithaca, NY: Paramount Market Publishing, 1999.

survey purpose
Fills a monitoring gap - no comprehensive statewide surveys on nutrition for 9-11 year-old age group

Includes dietary and physical activity practices on a typical school day; knowledge, attitudes, beliefs

Evaluates knowledge and awareness of 5 a Day–Power Play!

Survey Purpose
sample selection and administration
Market research panel population

Demographically diverse, English-speaking sample

Conducted April - June 1999

Parent-assisted 2-day food and physical activity diary: Mailed, filled out, and returned

Unassisted telephone survey

14 minutes, 44 questions

Sample Selection and Administration
sampling and response rate
Quota sampling

Demographically reflect California households with 9-11 year old children

Pool of 2000 qualified households selected from the market research panel

814 returned food and activity diary

41% response rate

394 completed telephone interview

51% response rate

Sampling and Response Rate
paid advertising and public service announcements psa in 1999
Commercial

Three Wishes

FV make you faster, stronger, and learn more

FV give you power

5 a Day is important

PSA

Shaq’s Secret

5 a Day is important

FV give you power

Paid Advertising and Public Service Announcements (PSA) in 1999
slide13

California Children Aware of

5 a Day-Power

Play! Campaign

TV Spots, 1999,

by Gender**, Ethnicity*, and Income*

Percent of Children

48

50

40

35

31

30

24

22

21

21

20

18

20

10

0

Boys

White

Latino

$19,999 or less

$50,000 or more

Girls

African American

Asian/Other

$20,000-$49,999

* p<.05; ** p<.01

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

slide14

California Children Aware of

5 a Day-Power Play!

Campaign

TV Spots Were More Likely to Know

that 5 or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Are

Needed for Good Health, 1999

Percent of Children

Aware of 5 a Day-Power Play!

60

53

Yes

No/Don't Know

47

50

40

28

27

30

24

20

20

10

0

0-2 Servings

3-4 Servings

5+ Servings

Fruits and Vegetables Believed Needed

p<.001

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

slide15

California Children Aware of

5 a Day-Power Play!

Campaign

TV Spots Were More Likely to Eat

5 or More Servings of Fruits and Vegetables, 1999

Percent of Children

60

Aware of 5 a Day-Power Play!

Yes

No/Don't Know

50

40

39

38

40

30

26

25

17

20

12

10

5

0

0 Servings

1-2 Servings

3-4 Servings

5+ Servings

Fruit and Vegetable Intake

p<.05

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

slide18

Associations Between Who Makes Meals and Snacks

and Fruit and Vegetable Intake, 1999

Percent of Children Who Ate a Serving of Fruit or Vegetable

80

71

Who Made Meal/Snack

70

Child Alone

Mom/Dad/Adult

56

60

School

52

47

50

40

29

30

21

20

15

7

10

0

After-School

Breakfast***

Lunch**

Snack***

** p<.01; *** p<.001

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

slide20

California Children Who Participated in School Meals

Were More Likely to Eat 5 or More Servings

of Fruits and Vegetables, 1999

Percent of Children Meeting 5 a Day Goal

Participated in School Meals

40

37

Yes

No

30

23

20

17

16

10

0

School Lunch**

School Breakfast***

** p<.01; *** p<.001

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

slide21

California Children's Access to Soda Vending

Machines, Candy Vending Machines, and

Fast Food on School Campuses, 1999

Percent of Children

30

24

25

20

16

15

10

8

5

0

Vending Machine

Vending Machine with

School Cafeteria

Serves Fast Food

with Soda

Chips and Candy

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

vending machines linked to vegetable intake
Soda vending machines at school

Ate significantly fewer servings of vegetables (0.7 vs. 1.3 servings, p<.001)

Vending machines stocked with chips and candy at school

Ate significantly fewer servings of salad (0.1 vs. 0.3 servings, p<.001)

Vending Machines Linked to Vegetable Intake
slide23

California Children's Participation in

Physical Education by Total Minutes

of Daily Physical Activity, 1999

Minutes of Physical Activity

96

100

93

91

80

69

66

60

40

20

0

None

1 or Less Times

2 Times

3-4 Times

5 Times

Physical Education Per Week

Source: California Department of Health Services, Preliminary data.

physical education linked to daily physical activity
Schools made students exercise (84 vs. 63 minutes of daily PA, p<.01)

Children who participated in PE 2 or more times per week (22-30 minutes more daily PA, p<.001)

Physical Education Linked to Daily Physical Activity
prioritize campaign activities food preparation
Prioritize Campaign Activities:Food Preparation
  • Encourage children to participate in school meal programs
prioritize campaign activities school environment
Address soda vending machines, vending machines stocked with chips and candy, and fast food in schools

Replace soda, chips, and candy with more nutritious foods

Promote the voluntary adoption of school nutrition guidelines

Educate legislators

Prioritize Campaign Activities:School Environment
prioritize campaign activities school environment1
Encourage schools to enforce existing PE requirement of 200 minutes of PE every 10 days

Promote the voluntary adoption of school PE guidelines

Educate legislators

Prioritize Campaign Activities:School Environment
angie keihner 916 449 5389 akeihner@dhs ca gov www ca5aday com
Angie Keihner

916-449-5389

akeihner@dhs.ca.gov

www.ca5aday.com