Sources Cited by Dr. Ed Simpson in his presentations to the workshop - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Sources Cited by Dr. Ed Simpson in his presentations to the workshop

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  1. Sources Cited by Dr. Ed Simpson in his presentations to the workshop • Academic Strategy: The Management Revolution in American Higher Education by George Keller. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Published in Cooperation with the American Association for Higher Education. 1983. • College and University Budgeting: An Introduction for Faculty and Academic Administrators (2nd ed.) by Richard J. Meisinger. National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, D.C., 1994. • Managing at the Speed of Change by Daryl R. Conner. Villard Books, New York. 1995. • Strategic Change in Colleges and Universities by D.J. Rowley, H.D. Lujan, and M.G. Dolence. Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco. 1997.

  2. Higher Education Enrollment • Projecting and managing costs in higher education is influenced greatly, of course, by the current enrollment and enrollment projections. The following data are from the National Center for Education statistics. • Overall enrollment in institutions of higher education is expected to rise between 1998 and the year 2010. • Changes in age specific enrollment rates and college age populations will affect enrollment levels over this period. • The most important factor in the projected rise in college enrollment is the projected increase of 18% in the general college population of 18 to 24 year olds from 1998 to 2010. (National Center of Education Statistics, 2001)

  3. Higher Education Enrollment, (Cont.) • Total higher education enrollment is projected to increase from an estimated 14.6 million in 1998 to 17.5 million by the year 2010, an increase of 20%. • A low projection is a 17% increase and a high is 24%. • Women were 57% of all college students in 1998 compared with 52% in 1985. • Women are expected to increase their share to 58% of college enrollment in the year 2010. (National Center of Education Statistics, 2001)

  4. Higher Education Enrollment, (Cont.) College Enrollment by Age • The enrollment of students who are 18 to 24 years old increased from 7.9 million in 1990 to an estimated 8.4 million in 1998, an increase of 7%. • This number is expected to increase to 10.5 million by the year 2010, an increase of 25% from 1998. • As a result, the proportion of students who are 18 to 24 years old, which remained at 57% in 1990 and 1998, is projected to be 60% by the year 2010. (National Center of Education Statistics, 2001)

  5. Higher Education Enrollment, (Cont.) College Enrollment by Age (Cont.) • The enrollment of students who are 25 years and over increased from 5.8 million in 1990 to an estimated 6.1 million in 1998, an increase of 5%. • This number is projected to be 6.8 million in 2010, an increase of 11% from 1998. • The proportion of students 25 years old and over remained at 42% in 1990 and 1998. • It is projected to be 39% by the year 2010. (National Center of Education Statistics, 2001)

  6. Higher Education Enrollment (Cont.) Current-Fund Expenditures of Institutions of Higher Education • From 1995-96 to 2009-10, current-fund expenditures are projected to increase in constant dollars in both public and private institutions of higher education. • Under the middle alternative, total current-fund expenditures are projected to increase 50% in constant dollars. • A 52% increase is projected for public institutions under the middle alternative and a 45% increase is projected for private institutions. (National Center of Education Statistics, 2001)