Rainwater Collection & Utilization for Irrigation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Rainwater Collection & Utilization for Irrigation

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  1. Rainwater Collection & Utilization for Irrigation Jeremy M. Mansell CID, CIC, CGIA, CLIA, ARCSA AP Senior Technical Trainer

  2. Alternative Water Sources • Rainwater is water that falls on a roof or other hard, impervious non-pedestrian, non-vehicular surface and is captured, filtered and stored. • Storm water is rainwater that has made contact with the ground, sidewalks, parking lots and other surfaces that can contribute contaminates. • Gray water is untreated, non-industrial wastewater that has not come in to contact with sewerage. Gray water includes used water from bathtubs, showers, sinks and clothes washers. • Black water is untreated sewerage that contains fecal matter and urine. • Reclaimed water is water treated to domestic wastewater tertiary standards and suitable for non-potable uses.

  3. What is a Rainwater Harvesting System? • Rainwater harvesting is the capture, diversion and storage of rainwater for a number of different purposes including, but not limited to, landscape irrigation. • Rainwater harvesting also includes land-based systems with man-made landscape features to channel and concentrate rainwater in either storage basins or planted areas.

  4. Rainwater Uses Rainwater can be used for • Potable water • Drinking water • Dish Washing • Indoor non-potable water • Laundry • Sink/Shower • Toilet Flushing • Outdoor non-potable • Car Washing • IRRIGATION

  5. Rainwater Harvesting System Overview

  6. Why Harvest Rainwater?

  7. Blake, John. “Drought parches much of the US, may get worse” CNN; February 24,2009 Water & Power Savings • 36 States in the US will experience some level of drought stress in 2010 • Harvested rainwater provides a water source when ground water is unavailable or unacceptable • The end use of the harvested water is close to the source no costly distribution systems

  8. Reduced Environmental Impact • Flooding & Storm water Damage

  9. Reduced Pollution Potential • Fertilizers, Chemicals, Oils, and other pollutants are carried to storm drains, ending up in a surface water or ground water supply

  10. Money Savings • The water is free – only cost for collection and use • Reduces utility bills Example of Tiered Billing Using the table to the left, with a 5/8" meter, if a family used 12,000 gallons of water they would be charged: $15.12 for the monthly minimum. $2.32 per 1,000 gallons for the first 10,000 gallons ($2.32 x 10 = $23.20). $3.24 per 1,000 gallons for the remaining 2,000 gallons ($3.24 x 2 = $6.48). $.30 per 1,000 gallons for all 12,000 gallons ($.30 x 12 = $3.60). The total cost (before taxes) for the use of 12,000 gallons is $48.40               ($15.12 + $23.20 + $6.48 + $3.60). Tier/gallons per 1,000 gallons 0 - 10,000 $2.32 10,001 - 20,000 $3.24 20,001 - 30,000 $4.21 30,001 - 40,000 $5.18 40,001 and above $7.45 Groundwater Resource/Acquisition Fee$.30

  11. Plant Water Use • Most plants respond favorably to a slightly lowered pH level • Many gardeners find if a plant that should produce flowers does not, adding a tablespoon of white vinegar (4-6% acetic acid) to 5 gallons of water and applying it to the plant will cause it to bloom.

  12. USGBC & LEED • US Green Building Council • A nonprofit membership organization with a vision of a sustainable built environment within a generation. Its membership includes corporations, builders, universities, government agencies, and other nonprofit organizations. • LEED – Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design • Green Building Rating System is a voluntary, consensus-based national rating system for developing high-performance, sustainable buildings.

  13. LEED for New Construction • 2 points available for Water Efficient Landscaping • 1 point for reducing water use for landscaping by 50% over normal means • A second point is available by eliminating all potable water use or by eliminating irrigation • A temporary irrigation system is allowed to establish the landscape. It must be removed after 1 year. • Use of drip irrigation is the easiest way to get the first point. RWH is another option.

  14. LEED for Existing Buildings • Up to 3 points available for water efficient landscape irrigation • 1 point by reducing potable water use by 50% • 2 points for a 75% reduction • 3 points for a 100% reduction

  15. LEED for Homes • A maximum of 5 points available for water reuse • RWH system • Gray water use • A maximum of 4 points available for a high efficiency irrigation system • Smart controller • Head to head coverage • Check valves • Drip irrigation • Installation by a Water Sense professional

  16. Questions

  17. For More Information If you would like more information on the components and inner-workings of a Rainwater Harvesting System, Please join Rain Bird Services Corporation for the new Rainwater Collection & Utilization for Irrigation training course. Please visit www.rainbirdservicescorporation.com/training for a full course description and to register for a class near you.

  18. Discount! Register for the 145 – Rainwater Collection & Utilization for Irrigation course at any location by September 30th, and receive a 25% discount off of the cost of the class. Use promo code RWHWEB when registering to receive your discount

  19. Rain Bird Services CorporationThanks You