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Behavior Intervention Case Manager (BICM) Certification Training. Presented by:. Roger Hammond, Credentialed School Psychologist. 1. Behavior Plan Practicum: Developing and Scoring High Quality Behavior Plans. Co-Developed By: Diana Browning Wright & Dru Saren. 2. Who am I?. 3.

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behavior intervention case manager bicm certification training
Behavior Intervention Case Manager (BICM) Certification Training

Presented by:

Roger Hammond, Credentialed School Psychologist

1

behavior plan practicum developing and scoring high quality behavior plans
Behavior Plan Practicum:Developing and Scoring High Quality Behavior Plans

Co-Developed By:

Diana Browning Wright

&

Dru Saren

2

objectives
Objectives

Understand

  • BICM Certification requirements
  • The Regulations pertaining to Behavioral Interventions for Special Needs students
  • The process for developing compliant and effective Positive Behavior Support Plans
  • The process for conducting an FAA
  • The role of the BICM in developing Positive Behavior Intervention Plans and supporting the IEP team

5

agenda
Agenda:
  • See handout

6

the regulations
The Regulations
  • Behavioral Assessment
  • Functional Analysis Assessment (FAA)
  • Serious Behavior Problems and Behavioral Emergency Procedures
  • Role of the BICM and IEP Team
decision making
Decision Making
  • See flow sheets- Behavior Plans in California
underlying principles and foundations
Underlying Principles and Foundations
  • Behavior Support Plan
  • Why?

It’s the Law

It is best practice

It improves outcomes

It increases staff morale

idea 2004
IDEA 2004
  • Behavior impeding learning of student or peers
  • Strategies, including positive behavioral interventions, strategies and support
  • Public agency shall ensure that each teacher and provider is informed of their specific responsibilities to accommodate, modify and support….
  • 45 day school placement: services to be sure behavior doesn’t reoccur

9

behavior support plans
Behavior Support Plans
  • For whom?

Any student who needs one!

11

behavior support plans12
Behavior Support Plans
  • Who makes up the team?

Everyone relevant to the implementation

12

what behavior support plans
What Behavior Support Plans?
  • Positive Behavior Support Plans (PBSP): Developed when behavior is “impeding learning”
  • Positive Behavior Intervention Plans(PBIP): Developed when there is “serious behavior” which includes
    • Assaultive
    • Self-injurious
    • Serious property damage
    • Other pervasive maladaptive behavior

13

behavior support plans14
Behavior Support Plans
  • Remember California’s Ed Code on behavior for students with disabilities
  • We must also use all 4 Faa/pbip forms when:
    • the IEP team says the behavior is “serious”
    • a BICM has supervised or

conducted an FAA

    • a PBIP is recommended
    • See section 9 for the forms

14

three options for using the bsp r

17

Three Options for Using the BSP-R

1. IDEA/504 - Use the BSP as an attachment

The BSP is used to designate the positive behavioral supports required when “behavior is impeding learning” under Federal I.D.E.A.

This BSP attaches to an IEP or 504 plan for students with exceptional needs.

three options for using the bsp r17
Three Options for Using the BSP-R

2. Best Practices-Student Assistance Teams - Use the BSP as a stand-alone

The BSP is used by the student assistance team to designate the positive behavioral supports for any student with behavior support needs.

This BSP attaches to any

team notes to be given to

implementers.

18

use bsp r as the core behavior plan

19

Use BSP-R as the “Core” Behavior Plan

3. High documentation required: e.g., California’s FAA and PBIP, California Requirement - Combine with other 3 Sections

The Core Behavior Plan combines with the other 3 sections to become a complete FAA-PBIP that complies with California Ed. Code for “serious behavior”

“Serious” behavior is defined in CA Ed. Code as:

- Assaultive

- Self- injurious

- Severe property damage

- Other Pervasive, Maladaptive Behavior

grounding principle
Grounding Principle
  • NO intervention will work if implementers don’t genuinely care about the student & the student believes that.
    • Implementers must show they care for the student or no behavior plan will work.

20

behavior support plans20
Behavior Support Plans
  • Focus on…

SUPPORT

vs.

Management

21

behavior support plans21
Behavior Support Plans
  • Focus on…

FUNCTION

vs.

Consequences

22

behavior support plans22
Behavior Support Plans
  • Focus on…

ANTECEDENTS

vs.

Consequences

23

behavior support plans23
Behavior Support Plans
  • Focus on…

TEACHING

vs.

Controlling

24

quality bsps

25

QUALITY BSPs
  • All effective plans address both the environment and the function of the behavior
    • Change environments to eliminate the need to use this behavior
    • Teach alternative, acceptable (replacement) behaviors which allow student to get or reject something.
multiple purposes for a scoring guide

26

Multiple Purposes for a Scoring Guide
  • Use to train staff on the key concepts of applied behavioral analysis
multiple purposes for a scoring guide26
Multiple Purposes for a Scoring Guide
  • Use to improve the quality of BSPs AS they are being written

27

multiple purposes for a scoring guide27
Multiple Purposes for a Scoring Guide
  • Use when a BSP has not been successful.

28

multiple purposes of a scoring guide
Multiple Purposes of a Scoring Guide
  • Use to keep proper focus balance between positive behavioral interventions and potential future disciplinary considerations.

29

symbols
Symbols
  • Let’s review what the BSP should embody to achieve Positive Behavioral Support:

principles

key concepts

requirements

methods

30

what is the positive behavior support process
What ISthe Positive Behavior Support Process ?
  • A data-driven team approach with built-in accountability
    • Follows a carefully look at the context of the problem behavior
    • Hypothesizes why the behavior is occurring.
    • Develops a plan to teach the student a replacement behavior and new skills
    • Changes environments to match student needs
    • Involves people who really care about the student
    • Develops a written plan capturing the team’s decisions and methods

31

slide31

Positive Behavioral Support Principle:

Behavior serves a purpose for the student. All behaviors, including problem behavior, allow the student to get a need met (i.e., behavior serves a function). Although all functions are legitimate and desirable, the method or form of the behavior may require alteration.

33

slide32

Key Concept:

  • This behavior has worked in the past, or it is currently working to either:
  • get something the student desires or
  • avoid or protest something the student wishes to remove.

34

slide33

Requirement:

A behavior plan must identify the function of the problem behavior.

This is necessary in order to develop a plan that teaches an alternative replacement behavior that serves the same function.

37

slide34

Method:

Observing the student in the problem situation and interviewing others who are frequently present when the problem occurs is required.

Focusing on the student’s facial expression and the response of others often yields cues as to what the function of the behavior may be.

40

slide35

Examples of functions of behavior:

Billy 

Billy throws his work on the floor because it is hard work for him. When he does this, his face shows anger and frustration.

His actions are a protest.

41

slide36

Examples of functions of behavior:

Dolores

Dolores giggles and disrupts

peers around her because

she enjoys the attention and

reactions she gets and her face

shows pleasure and excitement.

Her actions are to get social attention, even when that attention from peers is one of displeasure and disapproval.

42

slide37

Examples of functions of behavior:

  Bruce 

Bruce uses swear words not related to what is going on around him. His face shows pleasure and excitement and he uses these words as a method of starting a conversation, e.g., his peers immediately tell him not to use these words and start conversing with him about the use of appropriate language.

His actions are to get social interactions started.

43

slide38

44

  • Positive Behavioral Support Principle:

Behavior is related to the context/ environment in which it occurs.

Key Concept:

Something is either present in the environment, or NOT present in the environment which increases the like-

lihood the problem

behavior will occur.

slide39

Requirement:

The behavior plan must identify what environmental features support the problem behavior. This is necessary in order to know what environmental changes will remove the student’s need to use the problem behavior to achieve something he or she desired.

45

slide41

47

Method:

Observing the student in the problem situation and interviewing others who are frequently present when the problem occurs is required. Focusing on everything going on around the student, the nature of the instruction, interactions with and around the student, and the work output required by the curriculum is necessary to understand why the student uses this problem behavior in that particular place, at that time.

slide42

48

Examples of context/environment impact on problem behavior:

Billy

Billy has NOT YET received

support to complete difficult

work. He throws math

or reading worksheets that

appear long and hard to him

on the floor.

slide43

Examples of context/environment

impact on problem behavior:

Dolores

Dolores has NOT YET received direct

instruction on how to appropriately

make and keep friends. Her peers

reinforce her behavior inadvertently by

their strong responses. Her peers have neither learned how to reinforce her for appropriate behavior, nor learned how to change their loud expressions of disapproval in response to Dolores’ behavior.

49

slide44

Examples of context/environment impact on problem behavior:

Bruce

Bruce has NOT YET received instruction on how to initiate social conversation without the use of his attention-getting swear words. His peers have not learned how to direct Bruce to use the alternative method of attention-seeking rather than giving him attention by correcting him for his attention-seeking behaviors. They will be important in shaping a new behavior.

50

slide45

Positive Behavioral Support Principle:

There are two strands to a complete behavior plan.

Key Concept:

Changing behavior requires addressing both the environmental features (removing the need for use of problem behavior to get needs met) AND developing a replacement behavior (teaching a functionally-equivalent behavior that student can use to get that same need met in an acceptable way).

51

slide46

Requirement:

A complete behavior plan must address both strands: make environmental changes that support acceptable behavior, AND specify how to teach or elicit functionally equivalent acceptable behavior and new skills.

52

slide47

Method:

Writing an effective two strand plan requires a collaborative team that includes plan implementers and other important, supportive people in the student’s life such as family members, any agency personnel

(e.g., social workers, mental

health providers, probation

officers) and of course the

student if his/her participation

is possible.

53

slide48

Examples of two strand, complete approaches:

Billy

Billy’s team decided, and his teacher

agreed, that she will alter his

assignments so that hard work will not

appear overwhelming to him (remove

need to protest). Billy will be taught

an acceptable protest for work that

appears difficult, such as calling the

teacher over and telling her the work

appears long and hard (functionally-

equivalent alternative behavior).

54

slide49

Examples of two strand, complete approaches:

Dolores

Dolores’ team, decided she will receive

instruction on how to make and keep

friends. Her peers will receive instruction

in how to calmly redirect her to use

appropriate interactions to achieve

their brief expressions of approval (remove need to get social attention in maladaptive ways). Dolores will learn brief interactions during work periods that result in social approval from her peers, yet do not disrupt others (get social attention with functionally-equivalent alternative behavior).

55

slide50

Examples of two strand, complete approaches:

Bruce

Bruce’s teachers will provide collaborative

learning opportunities that allow Bruce to

be in sustained social interactions with his

peers (removes need to use swear words

to start a social interaction). Bruce will be

taught specific social interaction initiation

techniques and his peers will be taught

how to prompt him to use these techniques (functionally equivalent ways of starting a social dialogue).

56

slide51

Positive Behavioral Support Principle:

New behavior must get a pay-off as big or bigger than the problem behavior.

Key Concept:

To achieve maintenance of a new behavior, it must be reinforced.

Reinforcement is actions we take, privileges or tangibles we give, that the student really wants to get, and therefore he/she does the behavior again and again to get that reinforcement.

57

slide52

Requirement:

The behavior plan must specify reinforcement for the new functionally equivalent behavior.

The behavior plan may also wish to specify general reinforcement for positive behaviors as well. Often a general lack of reinforcement available for following class rules will increase a wide range of problem behaviors. When reinforcement is given to all students for a wide range of positive behaviors, dramatically decreases in problem behaviors occurs.

58

slide53

Method:

Find out what the student typically seeks in the environment.

Ask the student and observe him/her in the situation or have the student complete a “reinforcement survey” of things s/he would want to earn. Does she like computer games? Adults to praise her work? Opportunities to be first in line? Make access to the reinforcer you discover contingent on performing the desired behavior. Parental reinforcement for progress should also be considered.

62

slide54

Examples of Reinforcement of Replacement Behavior:

Billy

Billy’s teacher will praise his use of the

new form of protest behavior his

behavior plan suggests, i.e.,

calling her over to tell the teacher

the work looks hard. (Efficacy

evidence: Billy’s classroom and

home behavior shows he is really

pleased by any positive attention

from adults.) She will also send home daily report cards describing his use of the new behavior and Billy’s parents will amply praise his new skill at home.

63

slide55

Examples of Reinforcement of Replacement Behavior:

Dolores

Dolores’ circle of friends will meet daily for

5 minutes at recess to praise Dolores for

her quiet, quick checking in with them

during a work period that does not disrupt

work. Dolores and her friends will all receive

points toward lunch with the teacher for their teamwork and support of each other. (Efficacy evidence: Dolores and her friends chose this reinforcer at the beginning of the intervention, telling the teacher how much they wanted the opportunity to be in the “lunch crew” they had observed other students earning).

64

slide56

Examples of Reinforcement of Replacement Behavior:

Bruce

Bruce’s friends will award him “friendly

talking” points and a “high five” gestural acknowledgement each time he tries to

start a conversation using the language

scripts he has been taught. The teacher

will allow Bruce to choose from a menu

of tangible and activity reinforcers for every 10 points earned. (Efficacy evidence: Bruce loves the high fives from adults and peers and says he wants to earn the variety of reinforcers on the list).

65

slide57

Positive Behavioral Support Principle:

Implementers need to know how to handle problem behavior if it occurs again.

Key Concept:

The behavior plan must specify reactive

strategies across four stages:

1) Beginning stage: Prompting the alternative replacement behavior;

66

slide58

Key Concept:

The behavior plan must specify reactive strategies across four stages:

2) Mid-behavior stage: The problem behavior is fully present and now requires staff to handle the behavior safely through an individualized, careful deescalating of the behavior. This might include specific techniques, calming words, presenting of choices, distraction, and redirection. Each technique will likely be unique to the student. What has worked in the past is important to discuss. Some staff deescalate the student better than others and this should be considered.

68

slide59

Key Concept:

The behavior plan must specify reactive strategies across four stages:

3) Problem-solving/Debriefing stage: Debriefing with the student is to review what happened, practice the alternative behavior again, and plan what to do next.

4) Required consequences stage: Clearly written consequences or other team determined actions because of the behavior are important, e.g., school and district disciplinary required actions; calling parents; notifying probation department; attendance at special seminars, detention, and so forth.

70

slide60

Requirement:

All implementers must be clear on specifically how to handle behavior to assure safety of all and that the intervention matches the stage of escalation.

Method:

The behavior team will need to discuss what has worked in the past to alter the problem behavior, and what interventions are required at all four stages of problem behavior.

71

slide61

Example of reactive strategies:

Billy

Billy’s Behavior Support Plan includes

the four stages of reactive strategies

as follows:

1. Beginning Behavior Stage: Use gestures Billy has been taught that are cues to Billy to use the alternative protest, i.e., call the teacher over to protest hard work. Follow the “Stop and Think” gestural system taught to teachers and students at this school.

72

Howard Knoff, Stop & Think Social Skills Program, www.sopriswest.com

slide62

Example of reactive strategies:

Billy

Billy’s Behavior Support Plan includes

the four stages of reactive strategies

as follows:

2. Mid-behavior Stage: Increase proximity to Billy, point to the work on the floor, get on eye level, use calm voice requiring work to be replaced on desk, wait patiently for compliance and praise in accordance with the teacher training on “4 step procedure-One Minute Skill Building.” If Billy is too agitated to work, invite him to take a “Time Away” in a specified classroom area. Praise his return when he is ready to work.

73

slide63

Example of reactive strategies:

Billy

Billy’s Behavior Support Plan includes

the four stages of reactive strategies

as follows:

3. Debriefing Stage: Ask Billy why he chose the old form of protest rather than his new alternative. Have Billy help fill out the daily report card communicating the poor choice he made and what Billy and the teacher will do next time to help assure the new behavior to protest is selected.

74

slide64

Example of reactive strategies:

Billy’s Daily Report Card

75

slide65

Example of reactive strategies:

Billy

Billy’s Behavior Support Plan includes

the four stages of reactive strategies

as follows:

4. Consequences Stage: If the behavior escalates to loud swearing, Billy will be sent to the counselor to complete a written process, “My Inappropriate Behavior,” which may or may not result in a suspension or other school disciplinary procedures given by the Vice Principal for the disruptive behavior.

76

slide66

Example of reactive strategies:

Billy’s “My Inappropriate Behavior”

(see handouts)

77

slide67

Positive Behavioral Support Principle:

On-going communication needs to be between all important stakeholders in the student’s life.

Key Concept:

The behavior plan must specify who communicates with whom, how frequently and in what manner. Two-way communication between message senders and recipients is important.

78

slide68

Requirement:

The communication needs to be frequently enough to result in the continuous teaming necessary to achieve success.

Method:

Communication ideas: sent home in writing, through messages on email or voice mail, through posting on a teacher’s answering machine in school (if information can be communicated in codes to assure confidentiality) or face-to-face.

79

slide69

Example of Communication

between important stakeholders:

Billy

Billy’s team decided on the following communication provisions:

1. Communication between: parents, teacher, school counselor, therapist from Department of Mental Health, school principal

80

slide70

Example of Communication between

important stakeholders:

Billy’s team decided on the following

communication provisions:

2. Frequency:

a. Daily:Report card on use of replacement behavior will be sent home; parents report back on praise or other reinforcers for accomplishment they gave Billy each day.

b. Weekly:Teacher will send weekly summary of Billy’s behavior to principal, school counselor, parents and therapist through email

81

slide71

Example of Communication between

important stakeholders:

Billy’s team decided on the following

communication provisions:

2. Frequency:

c. Per Incident:Episodes of protest that include throwing furniture or loud swearing will be reported to the school counselor, who will debrief and send “My Inappropriate Behavior” analysis sheet to the principal, therapist, family, teacher. Therapist and parents will communicate any discussions with Billy about the incident which have yielded important insights about future interventions to counselor, who will inform others as needed.

82

slide72

Example of Communication between

  • important stakeholders:
  • Billy’s team decided on the following
  • communication provisions:
  • Manner:
  • a. Daily: written report hand carried by Billy to parents
  • b. Weekly:email summaries using a report chart
  • c. Per Incident:paper copy to principal, teacher. Email scanned copy to therapist, family

83

slide73

What does the BSP QE measure?

  • Extent to which this plan reflects a team developed plan in alignment with principles of behavioral change from the field of applied behavior analysis
  • Those are the behavior

change principles we just

reviewed !

84

what the qe does not measure
What the QE does NOT measure
  • Whether the new behaviors, interventions, environmental changes, and reinforcers fit

the student

  • Whether this plan is developmentally appropriate

for this student

85

what the qe does not measure75
What the QE does NOT measure
  • Whether the hypothesized function is correct
  • Whether the plan was or will be implemented consistently and skillfully

86

slide76

The BSP QE Analysis Areas

_____ A. Problem Behavior

_____ B. Predictors of Behavior

_____ C. Analyzing What is Supporting Problem Behavior

_____ D. Environmental Changes

_____ E. Predictors Related to Function

_____ F. Function Related to Replacement Behaviors

_____ G. Teaching Strategies

_____ H. Reinforcement

_____ I. Reactive Strategies

_____ J. Goals and Objectives

_____ K. Team Coordination

_____ L. Communication

_____Total Score (X /24)

87

slide77

The BSP QE Analysis Results

ŸFewer than 12 points = Weak Plan

This plan may affect some change in problem behavior but the written plan only weakly expresses the principles of behavior change. This plan should be rewritten.

Ÿ13 – 16 points = Underdeveloped Plan

This plan may affect some change in problem behavior but would require a number of alterations for the written plan to clearly embody best practice. Consider alterations.

Ÿ17 – 21 points = Good Plan

This plan is likely to affect a change in problem behavior and elements of best practice are present.

Ÿ22 – 24 points = Superior Plan

This plan is likely to affect a change in problem behavior and embodies best practice.

88

scoring suggestions
Scoring Suggestions

Look at the criteria for 2 first.

If it’s not met, look at 0. Figure a 1 from there.

91

scoring problems
Scoring Problems
  • When there is lots of extraneous information, such as curriculum adaptations not relevant to the problem behavior

IGNORE IT!!

93

scoring problems84

95

Scoring Problems
  • “Logically related” means that you can grasp the connection between the items.

DON’T OVERANALYZE!

scoring suggestions85
Scoring Suggestions
  • Score leniently if you have reason to believe that the principles and key concepts are there.

96

scoring problem
Scoring Problem
  • Writing a “gold standard” goal and objective in the era of accountability
  • 6 Key Components for Scoring A Complete Goal or Objective

1) observable and measurable,

2)specifies what the student will do,

3)by when will criteria be reached,

4)under what conditions,

5)at what level of proficiency,

6) how and by whom mastery will be measured

97

example goals what is the score
Example Goals: What is the score?
  • Mike will stop fighting on the playground
  • By 1.04.03 Mike will use appropriate

behaviors on the playground

  • By 1.04.03 Mike will substitute

appropriate behaviors (seeking help,

walking away or verbally problem-

solving as taught by the counselor) in lieu of physical aggression as measured by counselor observations and recording on an IEP team designed record sheet for 90% of yard observations.

98

activity
Activity
  • Scoring “Ralph’s” BSP
  • gang affiliation
  • threatened peer
  • expulsion considered
  • but didn’t “pass” manifestation determination
  • placement changed

99

functional analysis assessment faa
Functional Analysis Assessment(FAA)
  • Data Collection

Participants in this section of the training will focus on the student they identified for data collection from Training Day 1

Review of Supplemental Handout packet

functional analysis assessment
Functional Analysis Assessment
  • Reviewing records

History of the behavior

Analyzing previous interventions

Correlating the impact of Variables over time

Establishing a Learner Profile-Assets and deficits

functional analysis assessment92
Functional Analysis Assessment
  • Interviewing Key Personnel

History of the Behavior

Analyzing Previous Interventions

Discovering Impact Factors

Clarifying Learner Profile

Charting schedules and routines

Reinforcement Surveys

functional analysis assessment93
Functional Analysis Assessment
  • Observational Data

Frequency Data

Temporal Data

ABC data

Depicting the Data-Graphs and Charts

functional analysis assessments
Functional Analysis Assessments
  • Analysis of Data

Finding the Patterns

Generating Hypotheses-Linking the ABC’s to the Function

Creating probes to test the hypothesis

Developing an Assessment Plan