Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Economic Effects of the Crusades: PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Economic Effects of the Crusades:

Economic Effects of the Crusades:

133 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Economic Effects of the Crusades:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. The Renaissance – Rebirth of art and learning in Europe (1300-1600)Background: The Crusades stimulated trade by introducing Europeans to many desirable products, and trade promoted contacts with the Byzantine and Muslim Empires.

  2. Economic Effects of the Crusades: • Increased demand for Middle Eastern products • Stimulated production of good to trade in Middle Eastern markets • Encouraged the use of credit and banking

  3. Economic Concepts of the Renaissance • Church rule against usury and the banks’ practice of charging interest helped to secularize northern Italy. • Usury – loaning money with really high interest rates

  4. Economic Concepts of the Renaissance • Letters of credit served to expand the supply of money and stimulated trade • New accounting and bookkeeping practices (use of Arabic numerals) were introduced

  5. Significance- wealth accumulated from European trade with the Middle East led to the rise of Italian city-states. Wealthy merchants were active civic leaders.

  6. Advantages of Location for Northern Italian cities during the Renaissance: Florence, Venice, and Genoa

  7. Advantages of Location for Northern Italian cities during the Renaissance: • Had access to trade routes connecting Europe with Middle Eastern markets • Served as trading centers for the distribution of goods to northern Europe • Were initially independent city-states governed as republics

  8. Machiavelli’s Ideas about Power: Background: Machiavelli observed city-state rulers of his day and produced guidelines for the acquisition and maintenance of power by absolute rule.

  9. Machiavelli published his ideas in a book called The Prince.

  10. Machiavelli’s Ideas about Power: • An early modern narrative on government • Supported absolute power of the ruler • Maintains that the end justifies the means – the way in which you do something isn’t as important as the end result • Advises that one should do good if possible, but do evil when necessary

  11. Background: The Renaissance produced new ideas that were reflected in the arts, philosophy, and literature. People wealthy from newly expanded trade, called Patrons, sponsored works that glorified city-states in northern Italy. Education became increasingly secular.

  12. Art and Literature: • Medieval art and literature – focused on the Church and salvation • Renaissance art and literature – focused on individuals and worldly (secular) matters, along with Christianity

  13. Italian Renaissance Artists and Writers: • Leonardo da Vinci – Mona Lisa and The Last Supper • Michelangelo – Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and David • Petrarch – Sonnets, humanist scholarship

  14. Humanism: • Background - classical knowledge of the ancient Greeks and Romans fostered humanism in the Italian Renaissance.

  15. Humanism: • Celebrated the individual • Stimulated the study of Greek and Roman literature and culture • Was supported by wealthy patrons

  16. The Northern Renaissance: • Background – with rise of trade, travel, and literacy the Italian Renaissance spread to northern Europe.

  17. Art and Literature changed as different cultures adopted Renaissance ideas: • Growing wealth in Northern Europe supported Renaissance ideas. • Northern Renaissance thinkers merged humanist ideas with Christianity

  18. Art and Literature changed as different cultures adopted Renaissance ideas: • The moveable type of printing press and the production and sale of books (Gutenberg Bible) helped spread ideas

  19. Important Artists and Writers of the Northern Renaissance • Erasmus – The Praise of Folly (1511) • Poked fun at greedy merchants

  20. Important Artists and Writers of the Northern Renaissance • Sir Thomas More – Utopia (1516) • Discussed perfect/ideal society • Significance- Northern Renaissance artists portrayed religious and secular objects