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Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocate Overview

Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocate Overview

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Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocate Overview

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  1. Migrant Graduation Specialist and Student Advocate Overview Webinar October 25, 2012 9 a.m. – noon Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program

  2. Workshop Topics • Welcome New MGSs and MSAs • OSPI State MEP Priorities and Service Delivery Plan Highlights • Supplant Vs. Supplement (independent study required) • Review Research Model (independent study required) • Major Functions - New Job Descriptions & Prioritized Workload(independent study required) • Academic Guidance – Strategies and Migrant Student Plan of Action/Support of High School and Beyond • Student Selection • New Student Needs Assessment and Priority for Service Definitions • New Documentation Log • 2012-13 Monitoring Schedule

  3. Welcome Veteran and New MGS/MSAs

  4. Veteran MGSs and MSAs Outperformed 2010 to 2012!

  5. Over 54 Veteran and 8 NewAdvocates in 45 Schools

  6. Glossary of Terms • Acronyms – Migrant Education Uses Many • Migrant Educators—the ultimate text messengers  • Glossary available at: www.semy.org

  7. OSPI State MEP Priorities and Service Delivery Plan Highlights

  8. MEP State Priorities and Service Delivery Plan Highlights • Academics – close the achievement gap in reading, math, writing, and science. • Continuance – school readiness, increase graduation rate, and decrease drop-out rate. State MEP Conference (August) - https://www.msdr.org/resources/MigrantBringingTheFuture.pdf

  9. MEP State Priorities and Service Delivery Plan Highlights 3. English language proficiency – coordination of services with State Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program and Title III English Language Acquisition Program. State MEP Conference (August) - https://www.msdr.org/resources/MigrantBringingTheFuture.pdf

  10. MEP State Priorities and Service Delivery Plan Highlights 4. Non-academic services (to the extent feasible): advocacy and outreach to migrant children and families; professional development for program; family literacy programs; integration of information technology into educational and related programs; and programs to facilitate the transition of secondary school students to post-secondary education or employment. State MEP Conference (August) - https://www.msdr.org/resources/MigrantBringingTheFuture.pdf

  11. WHAT YOU DO -- WHEN PAID BY MIGRANT EDUCATION -- IS IMPORTANT! ESSENTIAL Do’s and Don’ts: Supplementing Basic Education and Other Education Programs to Support Migrant Student Academic Achievement • DO Always communicate with your supervisor and federal grants administrator to understand size and scope of your job • DO Build relationships with students, school staff, community and family contacts • DO be sure to ‘stay legal’* • In general, DON’T do for migrant students what other programs are already or could be doing* • DON’T do activities already conducted by basic education for all students* *this is very broad generalization for discussion purposes only. Reference official supplant vs. supplement guidance, and call OSPI Migrant Education, (360) 725-6147 if you have questions.

  12. Supplement vs. Supplant OMB Circular A-133 "In the following instances, it is presumed that supplanting has occurred: • The SEA or LEA used Federal funds to provide services that the SEA or LEA wasrequired to make available under other Federal, State or local laws. • The SEA or LEA used Federal funds to provide services that the SEA or LEA provided with non-Federal funds in the prior year. • The SEA or LEA used Title I, Part A or MEP funds to provide services for participating children that the SEA or LEA provided with non-Federal funds for nonparticipating children. These presumptions are rebuttable if the SEA or LEA can demonstrate that it would not have provided the services in question with non-Federal funds had the Federal funds not been available.” Excerpted from OSPI MEP Webinar (September) - http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/Webinar/2012Sept/MBWebinarMigrant.wmv SEA=State Educational Agency LEA=Local Education Agency

  13. Supplement vs. Supplant Definition of Services “Servicesare distinct in that they are the educational or educationally related activities provided to migrant children to enable them to succeed in school. The criteria for determining whether the activity is a service include: • directly benefits migrant students; • is grounded in scientifically based research; and • will increase the students’ academic skills and thereby increase their ability to meet the State’s performance targets. Remember PFS: In providing services, SEAs must give priority to migrant children who are failing or are most at risk of failing and whose education has been interrupted during the regular school year…” Excerpted from OSPI MEP Allowable Activities handout presented on 09/28/12

  14. Supplement vs. SupplantMGS/MSA Examples of Supplement vs. Supplant Always ask: “What would happen in the absence of MEP funds?”

  15. Academic Press and Social Support Research Based ModelThis research has been acknowledged by Washington State Migrant Education as a viable and pertinent information upon which to base a student advocacy model for migrant students.

  16. Proven Model • Research based model implemented at Sunnyside Senior High where 18% are migrant • Proven results: • Increased graduation rate in one year from 70.9% to 79.2% • High staff:student efficacy • All hands on deck • School-wide philosophical basis • Professional development • Specific and accountable staff and student roles

  17. Research Based Model Relational Trust Feeling Safe Having something to offer Provide time and expertise LEARNING Academic Press Provides specific direction embedded in high standards/ goals and belief of success for everyone Social Support Provides assistance/ help in meeting expected standards/goals

  18. Just Academic Press and Social Support May Not Be Sustainable.What’s the Missing Piece? Basing reform on these two aspects has been shown to work but may not be sustainable

  19. Big Three Adding relational trust supports all parties within the reform effort and makes a more stable and sustainable model

  20. What Is Academic Press? BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN FACILITATING ACADEMIC PRESS? School Academic Support Structures Student Academic Preparedness Necessary Collective Teacher/Staff Beliefs • Postsecondary Readiness • Curriculum Rigor • Postsecondary Prepared and Aware • Classroom Press • Classroom curricular rigor, pedagogy and assessment • Teacher push towards academic performance • Necessary Student Characteristics • Persistence/Work Ethic/Beliefs • Goals Beyond High School

  21. Benefit to Students - Academic Press Academic Press affects student achievement in at least four ways: Enhances student self-concept – students see themselves as a learner. Promotes relational trust • Provides specific direction for student work and academic attainment. It points students and teachers to what they need to accomplish. • Creates incentives that motivate students and teachers to achieve at higher levels.

  22. What is Social Support? BE THINKING - WHAT IS THE MGS and MSA ROLE IN FACILITATING SOCIAL SUPPORT? Student Orientation Positive Orientation Towards School Sense of Belonging/Extracurricular Engagement Academic Self-Efficacy (Effort/Optimism) School Support Student Voice Discipline/Fairness • Teacher/Advocate Support • Teacher Characteristics and Beliefs • Student Perceptions of Staff Support • Support from Outside the School • Community Support • Parental Support • Peer Support • Peer Relations • Safety

  23. Benefit to Students - Social Support • Creates motivation for students to succeed. • Builds confidence of self. • Promotes relational trust. • Provides psychological safety. • Allows students to take risks, admit mistakes, ask for help, experience failure and bounce back (resiliency)

  24. Together Academic Press Social SupportBUILDS RELATIONSHIPS AND CONNECTS Migrant Students

  25. SHOULD THE MGS/MSA LINK RESEARCH WITH HIS/HER ADVOCACY DUTIES? YES! IT ALL TIES TOGETHER

  26. Major Functions Listed in New MGS - MSA Job Descriptions • Job Descriptions (independent study) • Overview of Positions • Job Functions • Definitions of Major Functions/Sample Strategies

  27. Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program MGS Or MSAJob Description General Description: The graduation specialist will act as a liaison and facilitator to school counselor for migrant students to successfully transition to next grade level, complete high school, and transition to postsecondary education or employment. Major Responsibilities: • Coordinate with school counselor, teachers, and other appropriate staff to develop a caseload of migrant students most at-risk of not meeting state academic and achievement standards. • Identify the barriers including educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, or other factors that inhibit the ability of selected migrant students to meet state academic and achievement standards. • Work with school counselor and selected students to develop student plans/goals that lead to a successful transition to the next grade level, graduation, and transition to postsecondary education or employment. • Develop mentor relationship with student caseload to facilitate needs of migrant students and their families. • Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community to reduce and/or eliminate identified barriers. • Coordinate access to services available through school district and/or community that strengthen communication, self-advocacy, and leadership skills. • Facilitate access to school counselor and teaching staff regarding academic needs, including class scheduling to ensure access to required courses for graduation and transition to postsecondary education or employment. • Facilitate understanding by student and family of district requirements toward graduation, including High School and Beyond Plan. • Work with school counselor to monitor attendance, discipline, credits/grades, and other social/academic issues that may impact the student’s ability to successfully transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. • Maintain on-going communication with counselor, students, families, and other school staff regarding the progress of the student to achieve established goals and transition to next grade level, graduate, or pursue postsecondary opportunities or employment. • Participate in professional development opportunities to strengthen skills in working with at-risk migrant students including consolidating credits, determining high school of graduation, motivational techniques, and reporting requirements. The specialist will: • Implement a case management model focused on providing supplemental support and intervention strategies to address the unique needs of migrant students. • Work with the district’s Migrant Education Federal Program’s director and school staff to identify and establish program and student goals in alignment with the district’s local plan and the State Service Delivery Plan. • Coordinate and ensure access to other services migrant students may be eligible and entitled to receive. Requirements: • Teaching credential or bachelor’s degree in a related field. • Experience working with at-risk migrant students and families. • Knowledge of secondary school programs and state and local graduation requirements. • Written and verbal communication skills in English and primary language of target population (e.g., Spanish, Russian). • Knowledge of basic computer software programs (e.g., Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint). • Experience working independently, semi-independently, and in collaborative teams. • Human relations, time management, and personal organizational skills. • Flexible work schedule. Preferred Knowledge and Skills: • Knowledge of economic, social, cultural, and psychological factors influencing migrant students. • Experience working with secondary school aged migrant students in an educational setting. • Knowledge of school and community resources available to migrant students and families, including technical education, career awareness, and postsecondary education opportunities. SAMPLE – available at www.semy.org

  28. Migrant Student Advocacy • Intervention on behalf of migrant students. • The coordination or facilitation of access to academic press and social support activities to successfully: • transition migrant students to the next grade level, • support students to complete high school, and • promote student transition to postsecondary education/employment.

  29. MGS and MSA CASE LOAD AND OVERVIEW MGS = 1 FTE : 50 students - indepthone-on-one mentoring/case management service for most at risk; monitors academics • Degreed individual • Collaborates with all to develop Migrant Student Plan of Action – for academic achievement • Coordinates academic activities with teachers and counselors • Facilitates access to services MSA = 1 FTE : 150 students - monitors academic progress • Follows lead of administrator • May work with students in small group format • Collaborates with all to develop Migrant Student Plan of Action – for academic achievement • Facilitates access to services *Full Time Equivalent

  30. MAJOR MGS and MSA FUNCTIONS -- SEE HANDOUTAdvocacy Services Prioritized as Funded by the MEP MGS= 1 FTE: 50 students Self initiates; collaborates with all; indepth one-on-one mentoring and case management service for most at risk; monitors academics; coordinates academic activities with teachers and counselors; facilitates access to services MSA= 1 FTE: 150 students Follows lead of administrator; monitors academic progress; may work with students in small group format; facilitates access to services *Staff with less than a full time FTE may modify level of service as FTE and time permit. Note: All services are intended as intervention to ensure high school graduation and are centered on ensuring ACADEMIC success and postsecondary transition. All services focus on the unique and supplemental needs of the migrant student. Staff may NOT supplant services and activities available to all students through the school.

  31. What Is My Job?MGS and MSA Supplemental Support ServicesDefinitions, Priorities and Sample Strategies SAMPLE – Go to handout

  32. Academic Guidance in Action SAMPLE – Go to handout

  33. A Few Academic Guidance Strategies

  34. Academic Guidance StrategiesPLACEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

  35. Academic Guidance StrategiesCOLLABORATION/ADVOCACY

  36. Academic Guidance StrategiesCOLLABORATION/ADVOCACY

  37. Academic Guidance StrategiesCOLLABORATION/ADVOCACY

  38. Learning Walks Observing students in classroom helps to: • Foster positive relations • Develop shared expectations • Promote questioning • Stimulate interest • Assists students to consider and identify processes that will support the achievement of the learning goals

  39. Tips for Conducting Learning Walks Student Questions In the Classroom Which Promote Academic Achievement and Assess Student Engagement: • What are you learning today? • What do you understand about the learning? • How does topic or goal connect to you? • What will you do now with your new learning? • Did the learning challenge you? • Are you engaged in this class today?

  40. Academic Guidance StrategiesCOLLABORATION/ADVOCACY

  41. Academic Guidance StrategiesHIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND/PLAN OF ACTION

  42. Academic Guidance StrategiesWITHDRAWAL

  43. High School and Beyond Planning and the Migrant Student Plan of Action Useful Tools SAMPLE – Go to handout

  44. How Do I Determine Who To Serve? Student Selection • Washington State Priority for Service Definition (pursuant to federal law Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Section 1304(d) • Student Needs Assessment Report

  45. Careful Selection of Students Meets Federal Requirements According to non-regulatory guidance: MGS/MSA staff must ensure PFS students’ needs are met first, before serving other migrant-eligible students.

  46. Washington State Priority for Service Definition Priority for Service (PFS) students are students: • whose education has been interrupted during the regular school year AND • who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet the State’s challenging State academic content standards and challenging State student academic achievement standards.

  47. Washington State Priority for Service Definition SAMPLE – Go to handout

  48. Priority for Service - Summary Criterion #1: Interrupted school year AND Criterion #2: Low academic state assessment scores (see handout) When state assessment data is unavailable, proxy risk factors may be applied.

  49. PFS – Proxy Risk Factors • Language Proficiency – student’s score on Washington’s English Language Proficiency test is within the limited English proficient levels (1, 2, and 3) • Retained – enrolled in same grade from one school year to next • Grade Age / Over age - age does not match acceptable range for grade level placement with in 2 years • Credit Deficiency (for secondary age students only) – student has not earned sufficient credits per his/her school’s graduation requirements and grade level

  50. Conducting a Student Needs Assessment Student Needs Assessment For WAMEP School District As of 10/16/2012 SAMPLE – Go to handout