Ergonomic Training for Garment Workers - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Ergonomic Training for Garment Workers
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Ergonomic Training for Garment Workers

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  1. Ergonomic Training for Garment Workers This material was produced under grant SH-19505-09-60-F-6 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the view or policies of the U. S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U. S. Government.

  2. Today we will discuss: • Why you get injured at your job • Some ways you can reduce injuries • The right kind of equipment to use to prevent injury

  3. At Our Clinic, We Discovered That Garment Workers Have Many Work-related Injuries Neck 33% Shoulder 23% Back 48% Elbow 15% Wrist 16% Hand 18% Knee 9% Other 22%

  4. WHY ARE YOU GETTING INJURED? • INJURIES ARE CAUSED BY:    • DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER AGAIN • WORKING IN AN AWKWARD POSITION • WORKING TOO HARD OR TOO LONG

  5. How does this injure you? When you use your muscles too much, They get little tears...

  6. This makes your muscle swell and feel … HOT SORE

  7. What else causes injuries to garment workers? SITTING OR STANDING IN THE SAME POSITION FOR A LONG TIME!

  8. SITTING TOO LONG STOPS THE BLOOD FROM GOING TO YOUR ARMS AND LEGS         • BLOOD BRINGS FOOD TO YOUR MUSCLES • WITHOUT BLOOD YOUR MUSCLES GET TIGHT AND TIRED

  9. Warning! These are the warning signs of injury… Pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, swelling, heat If you feel any of these symptoms, it’s time to take action!

  10. Neck, Upper Back and Shoulder Injuries • Causes • Working safely

  11. What’s wrong with this picture?

  12. Ouch! Awkward neck, and back position because of improper chair and table height or position.

  13. WHICH PICTURE SHOWS THE RIGHT WAY TO SIT?

  14. Question: How much do you think your head weighs? ANSWER: 10-12 pounds. That’s how much weight your neck must support!

  15. This is theBest Way to Sit Head only slightly bent Arms parallel to work surface Back Straight Hips and knees at 90 degrees Feet level

  16. And remember… Sitting in the same position for a long time, results in sore backs and necks.

  17. Take Your Breaks! You’re entitled to two 10 minute PAID breaks a day plus a 30 minute unpaid lunch break. It's the law!

  18. What’s wrong with this picture?

  19. Ouch! Awkward shoulder and elbow posture

  20. How will the worker in these pictures injure herself?

  21. Ouch! Bending and twisting to pick up fabric can hurt your back and shoulders.

  22. What is wrong with this picture?

  23. The fabric pieces and your tools should all be at the same height and within easy reach to prevent injury Close is best Keep all tools within this zone

  24. Arm, Hand and Finger Injuries • Causes • Working safely

  25. Wrong Right Keeping your wrist and hand in a straight line will prevent injury You hurt your wrists when you bend them like this NEUTRAL POSITION

  26. What is wrong with this picture?

  27. Wrong Right Keeping your wrist in neutral position will help prevent injuries. Bending your wrist and fingers like this will cause injuries! NEUTRAL POSITION

  28. Lower Back Injuries • Causes • Working safely

  29. What’s wrong with this picture?

  30. Ouch! • This chair doesn’t support the back • Seat is tilted backward • Chair edge presses against thigh

  31. Knee, Leg, and Foot Injuries • Causes • Working safely

  32. What’s wrong with this picture?

  33. Ouch! Hard Surface stops blood circulation, pinches nerves, and injures knee You need enough room to move your legs freely

  34. What’s wrong with this picture?

  35. Ouch! • Using only one foot on pedal is unbalanced. This can cause back and leg problems • Awkward ankle position • Sturdier shoes can provide better foot support

  36. What’s wrong with this picture?

  37. Straining to see your work hurts your neck, back and shoulders Garment workers need: • Good lighting • No glare • Eye exams and glasses if you have trouble seeing

  38. The Right Equipment Can Make a Big Difference in Your Health

  39. What Kind of Chair Do You Have? Bad seating injures us!

  40. Height adjustment Back support Sloped seat Padded seat support Many workers try to fix these problems

  41. AIWA's Lab • Garment workers and researchers from the University set up a testing lab in Oakland. • We used special equipment to measure work postures and to find the best equipment to prevent injuries.

  42. We Discovered that A Good Chair is Most Important For Your Health

  43. A Good Chair Should… • Adjust for proper height and comfort • Rotate so you don’t have to twist to reach bundles • Have a forward slope and “waterfall” edge • Provide good back support • Have padded seat to distribute weight evenly • Flat casters to prevent sliding

  44. The tilted seat pan will help you keep your back straight The “water fall” edge prevents pressure on your thighs when you sit all day

  45. Swivel Chairs Are Best For Your Back They allow you to turn easily to get bundles and pieces.

  46. Here is the footrest we designed... • It is inexpensive to make and keeps both feet level

  47. Our Table Extension • Notice the hinge. The extension can be lowered when not in use. It supports the fabric so you don’t have to twist and lift as much.

  48. Tilting the table a few degrees improves the line of vision. You can sit straighter when you work. Table Tilt

  49. It's Easy! • All it takes to do this is a small piece of board under both front legs of the table. • But it may take you a few days to get used to the new way of sitting

  50. NoSlip Material • Inexpensive non-skid shelf liner keeps material and tools from slipping when the table is tilted.