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Size Effects and Mechanical Properties of Thin Copper Foils. * University of Applied Sciences Augsburg, Germany ** ETH Zürich, Switzerland. J. Villain*, Ch. Weippert* G. Simons **, J. Dual**. Aim of the work. Thermo mechanical simulations are necessary to understand the

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slide1

Size Effects and Mechanical Properties

of Thin Copper Foils

* University of Applied Sciences Augsburg, Germany

** ETH Zürich, Switzerland

J. Villain*, Ch. Weippert*

G. Simons **, J. Dual**

slide2

Aim of the work

  • Thermo mechanical simulations are necessary to understand the
  • reliability of micro-electronic devices or micro-electromechanical systems.
  • For this investigations the material parameters as ultimate tensile strength,
  • elongation at rupture have to be determined for tests specimens which have
  • the same geometry as parts inside the devices. The preparation and the
  • measurement of very small test specimens is expensive.
  • Question: Could we use material parameters which were determined
  • with macro specimens - dimensions mm or cm?
  • Answer:
  • The first step is to analyse a size-effect.
  • If no size-effect could be seen, low cost large specimens could be used.
  • If a size-effect occurs, micro tests have to be developed or mathematical models have to be built up to characterise the size-effect.
slide3

Size-effects known in the literature

The smaller the specimens the higher the strength

and the lower the ductility, no size effect for Young`s modulus.

>>>> This tendency could be observed for several materials as

nickel and

polysilicon.

We are testing copper-foils at room temperature under same conditions (thickness: 10µm, 20 µm, 34 µm, 50 µm, 100 µm, 250 mm; same relation of thickness, width and gauge length; texture; hardness; strain velocity).

Tensile Module

slide4

Stress-Strain Diagram

(10 µm, 34 µm)

Surface of a 20 µm Specimen near Fracture

(Source: S.I.S., Rastersonden- und Sensor-messtechnik GmbH, Herzogenrath)

slide5

Results of the Tensile Tests

A strong decrese of the elongation at rupture and a smooth increase of the ultimate tensile strength with lower thickness of the copper foils