response to intervention for behavior n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Response to Intervention for Behavior PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Response to Intervention for Behavior

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 69

Response to Intervention for Behavior - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Uploaded on

Response to Intervention for Behavior. Team Training Strategies. Objectives. Define RtI for Behavior (RtIB) Review Behavior Data Sources Examine RtIB Tier Process and Procedures Identify Behavioral Interventions Apply the Problem solving Process to Case Studies Discuss Next Steps.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Response to Intervention for Behavior' - jasia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
objectives
Objectives
  • Define RtI for Behavior (RtIB)
  • Review Behavior Data Sources
  • Examine RtIB Tier Process and Procedures
  • Identify Behavioral Interventions
  • Apply the Problem solving Process to Case Studies
  • Discuss Next Steps
what is rti for behavior rtib
What Is RtI for Behavior (RtIB)
  • RtI for Behavior (RtIB) provides a data based problem solving, multi-tiered approach that aims to prevent inappropriate behavior and teach and reinforce appropriate behaviors.
what is rti for behavior rtib1
What Is RtI for Behavior (RtIB)

RtIB meets the needs of students and families by:

  • Creating a safe and positive school climate
  • Increasing academic engagement and motivation to learn
  • Using data to design, implement and monitor interventions
  • Creating school-wide policies, expectations, and processes
responding to behavior traditionally
Responding toBehavior: Traditionally
  • Reactive/Consequence Strategies
    • Office referral, detention, suspensions, etc.
    • Used to try to teach the “right way”
    • May actually reinforce the behavior of concern
  • Restrictive and segregated settings
traditional discipline versus rtib
Traditional Discipline:

Focused on the student’s problem behavior

Goal is to stop undesirable behavior through the use of punishment

Positive Behavior Support:

Replaces undesired behavior with a new behavior or skill

Alters environments

Teaches appropriate skills

Rewards appropriate behavior

Traditional Discipline versus RtIB
who from the leadership team facilitates rtib
Who from the Leadership Team Facilitates RtIB ???
  • Administrator
  • School Psychologist
  • School Social Worker
  • Guidance Counselor
  • TRUST Specialist
  • Behavior Management Teacher
  • School-based Professional Development Liaison
  • Team Leaders
behavior data sources
Behavior Data Sources
  • Student At Risk Profile Report (T-0515P71-01)
  • Suspensions reports
  • Attendance reports
  • Truancy reports
  • School climate survey
  • Course failures
  • Conduct grades
  • SCM reports
slide10

Tier 3: Intensive, Individual

  • Interventions
  • Individual Students
  • Assessment-based
  • High Intensity
  • Of longer duration
  • Tier 2: Supplemental
  • Interventions
  • Some students (at-risk)
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Tier 3
  • Direct observations
  • Progress monitoring data/response to intervention
  • Implementation fidelity
  • Tier 2
  • Progress monitoring data/response to intervention
  • Implementation fidelity
  • ESE referrals
  • Tier 1
  • Progress monitoring data/response to intervention
  • Implementation fidelity
  • ODRs, teacher nominations, attendance, walkthroughs
  • School-wide screening
  • Tier 1: Core Curriculum/
  • Universal Interventions
  • All settings, all students
  • Preventive, proactive
slide11

RTI

Continuum of Support for ALL

Math

Science

Spanish

Reading

Soc skills

Soc Studies

Basketball

Label behavior…not people

Dec 7, 2007

levels of support for behavior
Levels of Support for Behavior

Tier 3: Few Students

Tier 2: Small Groups of Students

Tier 1: All Students

12

rtib tier i
RtIB Tier I

Tier 1 is for all students.

The goal of RtIB at the Tier 1 level is the prevention of problem behavior and promotion of positive behavior by establishing processes that should facilitate success for at least 80% of the students.

rtib tier i components
RtIB Tier I Components

An effective Tier 1 process requires:

  • District and school missions with a clear and purposeful leadership that is committed to coordinating the implementation of evidence-based behavioral practices
  • An established process for consensus building
  • A data-based decision making system through the four step problem solving process
  • Established procedures for teaching expected behaviors
  • On-going monitoring and evaluation efforts linked to professional development needs and disseminated to stakeholders
universal support
Universal Support

As a system-wide Universal Support effort in schools, positive behavior support consists of expectations, rules, routines, and physical arrangements that are developed and taught by school staff to prevent initial occurrences of problem behavior

what will rtib look like in our school
What will RtIB look like in our school?
  • Data will be used to help track progress and identify areas to target for intervention
  • Discipline referral Processes & Procedures will be Consistent throughout the school
  • The school will develop and use school-wide Expectations & Rules in settings across campus to Teach students appropriate behavior
  • A Reward System will be used to encourage and model appropriate behavior and Effective Consequences will be developed and used to discourage inappropriate behavior.
school wide expectations
School-Wide Expectations

Definition:

A list of broad, positively stated behaviors that are desired of all faculty and students

These expectations should be in line with the school’s mission statement and should be taught to all faculty, students, and families

when identifying expectations
When Identifying Expectations

Consider existing data summaries:

Discipline

Academic

Identify common goals:

Mission Statement

Other School-Based Programs

Identify characteristics of an ideal student

Can be helpful with faculty buy-in

guidelines for identifying expectations
Guidelines forIdentifying Expectations

Identify behaviors expected of all students and staff in all settings

Select 3 to 5 behaviors

State expectations in positive terms

Select expectations that are general enough to be applicable in multiple settings, but specific enough to be of assistance in generating rules for targeted settings

which guidelines were not followed in these examples
Which Guidelines Were NotFollowed in These Examples?

Don’t run

Raise your hand and wait to be recognized before speaking

Be good

No talking

Stay in your seat

Act like ladies and gentlemen

rules for unique settings
Rules for Unique Settings

Definition:

Specific skills you want students to exhibit and the procedures you want students to follow in specific settings

how are expectations and rules similar
How Are Expectations and Rules Similar?

Both should be limited in number (3-5)

Both should be positively stated

Both should be aligned with the school’s mission statement & policies

Both should clarify criteria for successful performance

how rules are different
How Rules are Different

Rules describe specific behaviors:

Observable

Measurable

Rules may apply to a limited number of settings

Rules clarify the SW-Expectations for specific settings

which ones are expectations which ones are rules
Which Ones Are Expectations?Which Ones Are Rules?

Be considerate

Place food items in their proper containers

Remain seated during instruction

Use an inside voice

Be a problem solver

Keep all four legs of your chair on the floor

guidelines for creating rules
Guidelines for Creating Rules

Select NO MORE THAN 5 rules for each setting on campus

Rules should be observable, measurable, positively stated, & enforceable

You do not need to create a rule for each expectation

USE YOUR DATA to determine the problems you are experiencing most in those locations

Non-Example: “Chew with your mouth closed.”

slide27

My School’s

Expectations…

1. Be Safe

2. Be Responsible

3. Be Respectful

Once you have developed expectations and rules, it is not enough to just post words on the walls of the school…

YOU MUST TEACH THEM CONSISTENTLY ACROSS CAMPUS!

slide28

“If a child doesn’t know how to read,we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to swim,we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to multiply,we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to drive,we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to behave,we……teach?…punish?”

“Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?”

(Herner, 1998)

why develop a system for teaching behavior
Why Develop aSystem for Teaching Behavior?

Behaviors are prerequisites for academics

Procedures and routines create structure

Repetition is key to learning new skills:

For a child to learn something new, it needs to be repeated on average of 8 times

For a child to unlearn an old behavior and replace with a new behavior, the new behavior must be repeated on average 28 times (Harry Wong)

tier i interventions teaching appropriate behavior
Tier I Interventions: Teaching Appropriate Behavior
  • Behavioral Interventions in M-DCPS
    • Bullying / Violence Prevention Curriculum
    • M-DCPS Alternative to Suspension Program (ASP)
    • Crisis Prevention Planning
    • LEAPS
    • Positive Behavior Support (PBS)
    • CHAMPS
why develop a system for teaching behavior1
Why Develop aSystem for Teaching Behavior?

We must assume:

Students will require different curricula, instructional modalities, etc… to learn appropriate behavior

We need to teach expectations/rules and appropriate behaviors as effectively as we teach academic skills

why develop a school wide reward system
Why Develop aSchool-Wide Reward System?

Rewards are effective when:

used to build new skills or sustain desired skills

used with contingent delivery of rewards for specific behavior

gradually faded over time

Akin-Little, Eckert, Lovett, Little, 2004

why develop a school wide reward system1
Why Develop aSchool-Wide Reward System?

The immediate reward acts as a teaching tool for desired behavior

Focuses staff & student attention on desired behaviors

The immediate reward is a bridge to long-term reward

The immediate reward increases likelihoodof repeating the desired behavior

Fosters a positive school climate

Reduces the need for engaging in time-consuming disciplinary measures

Access to long-term reward increases the power of the immediate reinforcer

reward system guidelines
Reward System Guidelines

Reward contingent on desired behavior

Clearly define and train staff and students on the criteria for earning a reward

Encourage staff to reward students outside of their classroom in common areas

Plan for encouraging and monitoring staff use of the reward system

Keep it Simple

reward system guidelines1
Reward System Guidelines

Rewards should target 80% - 90% of students

Rewards should be portable and/or easy to use in multiple settings across school campus

Reward frequently in the beginning

Rewards should be varied to maintain student interest

Opportunities for naturally occurring reinforcement are still provided and encouraged

rtib in the classroom
RtIB in the Classroom

Classroom-Level RtIB provides tools that:

Support classroom teachers in embedding RtIB into their classroom practices

Support groups of students in need of behavioral support in addition to existing school-wide supports

building a foundation for rti
Building a Foundation for RtI

Classroom RtIB

Prevention

Tools for remediation

Room for accommodation

Classroom strategies should be included EARLY in hierarchy of supports

Individual Students

Small groups of students

Rough day in the classroom

Classroom

Tier 1/Universal

effective responses to problem behavior
Effective Responses to Problem Behavior

Including effective interventions at the classroom level:

Re-teach the expectations/rules

Change seating arrangements

Conference with parent and/or student

Peer mediation

Student contracts

Provide choices

Remove tempting items from the classroom

more effective responses to problem behavior
More Effective Responsesto Problem Behavior

Including effective interventions at the classroom level:

Humor

Let the student “save face”

Re-direction

Failure to earn a privilege

Restitution/Apology

Prompt & cue both verbal & non-verbal

Reward alternate positive behavior

intervention ideas http ici umn edu products impact 182 over5 html
Intervention Ideashttp://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/182/over5.html

Problem solving/Contracting

Restitution

Mini-Courses or skill modules

Parent involvement/supervision

Counseling

Monitoring/Self-Monitoring

Short or long term changes to schedule, classes, course content

rtib tier i universal screening
RtIB Tier I: Universal Screening

Universal Screening means all students are proactively screened at regularly scheduled times throughout the year to identify a select group of students who demonstrate early behavior warning signs that indicate risk for developing an emotional or behavioral disability.

rtib tier i process and screening
RtIB Tier I: Process and Screening
  • Use behavioral data sources to provide universal screening
  • Conduct screening quarterly
  • The problem solving process involves a review of data to determine which Tier 2 interventions may be appropriate
behavior data sources1
Behavior Data Sources
  • Student At Risk Profile Report (T-0515P71-01)
  • Suspensions reports
  • Attendance reports
  • Truancy reports
  • School climate survey
  • Course failures
  • Conduct grades
  • SCM reports
problem solving
Problem Solving

1. Define

the

Problem

2.Analyze

the

Problem

& Develop an

Intervention Plan

4. Evaluate

the

Intervention

Plan

3. Implement

the Plan &

Monitor the

Progress

44

problem solving response to intervention
Problem-Solving / Response to Intervention

Prior to making changes within the school environment, it is important to know what needs to be changed

Information about what is going on has to be accurate and useful for identifying problems

Analyze problems so that interventions can be effective and efficient

Decisions made with accurate dataare more likely to be:

Implemented

Effective

step 1 identify the problem
Step 1: Identify the Problem

Step 1 is critical to the process

Problems to be solved vs. “Issues” to address

Review existing information

Ask: Is it most, or is it some?

47

problem identification
Problem Identification
  • Referrals by location
  • Referrals by time of day
  • Referrals by staff
  • Referrals by behavior
  • Referrals by motivation
  • Administrative referrals
defining the problem
Defining the Problem

Specific, observable, measurable:

3rd grade students were responsible for 40% of our SCMs last month, and most of these took place during their 90-minute reading block, for disruption.

Sixty percent of our SCMs listed the Assistant Principal as the referring staff member.

did we define it
Did We Define It?

Students are not being respectful.

SCMs are increasing this month.

Most of our SCMs are taking place in an unknown location.

Students are late to class after lunch.

step 2 problem analysis
Step 2: Problem Analysis

Develop hypotheses and assessment questions

Make educated guesses as to WHY the problem is happening

Examine environmental factors, not just within child factors

Hypothesis Prediction statements

Confirm problem ID statement (if necessary)

Select possible data collection methods

Direct observation, reports, graphs, teacher/team nominations, etc.

step 3 develop implement the plan
Step 3: Develop & Implement the Plan

Brainstorm intervention strategies

Should directly link to your prediction statement (and goals).

Building up and maintaining your Tier 1 system should be part of your interventions

Develop a specific plan for implementation

Identify roles, responsibilities, timelines

Remember to include fidelity measures

step 4 evaluate the plan
Step 4: Evaluate the Plan

Look at the data you selected to measure your progress towards the goal.

Ask yourself…

Did we meet the goal?

Do we need to develop a new plan?

Were our problem ID statement and analysis correct?

Or, develop a plan to maintain or fade out the intervention if it was successful

rtib tier ii
RtIB Tier II
  • Tier 2 is support for small groups of students
  • The goal of RtIB at the Tier 2, level is to provide services for students whose behaviors require supplemental group intervention matched to the function of the student’s behavior
rtib tier ii1
RtIB Tier II
  • An effective RtIB system relies on the quality and integrity of the Tier 1 school-wide interventions.
  • Tier 2 does not replace Tier 1: rather it is additional or supplemental behavior support.
rtib tier ii what do you do
RtIB Tier II: What Do You Do?
  • Prior to consideration of Tier 2 interventions the Leadership Team needs to review the existing instructional program.
  • The Leadership Team should address possible adjustments that may ameliorate the presenting problems.
  • When the Leadership Team concludes that a student may require a supplemental evidence-based targeted group intervention, the team uses the problem solving process to review data to determine which Tier 2 interventions may be appropriate.
tier ii interventions teaching appropriate behavior
Tier II Interventions: Teaching Appropriate Behavior
  • Behavioral Interventions in M-DCPS
    • The Center for Special Instruction (CSI) using academic and behavioral interventions
    • Group intervention sessions for specific topics such as coping skills, anger management, problem-solving and conflict resolution, substance abuse, violence prevention, grief, assertiveness, developmental issues and social skills.
tier ii interventions teaching appropriate behavior1
Tier II Interventions: Teaching Appropriate Behavior
  • Behavioral Interventions in M-DCPS
    • Alternative to Suspension (Examples: Saturday school, after school, work detail)
    • School-based mentors
    • Second Step: A Violence Prevention Curriculum
    • Social Skills Training
    • Individual, family and group counseling
    • LEAPS
    • Behavioral Contracting
tier ii monitoring and screening
Tier II Monitoring and Screening
  • Monitor
    • Progress monitor Tier 2 interventions for identified students
    • Modify interventions at Tier 2 (as needed)
  • Screening
    • Identify at-risk students
    • Makes referrals for Tier 3 interventions
    • Complete the Functional Assessments of Behavior (FAB) process.
rtib tier iii
RtIB Tier III
  • Tier 3 is support for few students
  • The goal of RtIB at the Tier 3 level is to increase the individual student’s rate of progress through intensive individual interventions for specific skill deficits.
  • These interventions are derived from the results of the FAB process conducted at Tier 2, which are used to formulate the BIP.
  • This plan is used for the implementation and monitoring of the Tier 3 interventions.
rtib tier iii what do you do
RtIB Tier III: What Do You Do?
  • At Tier 3 the school site SST members collaboratively develops a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP), based on the FAB process.
  • Selected staff implements the BIP, monitors student progress, reviews individual student response to intervention, and determines whether changes should be made to the existing BIP or if further assistance is needed.
tier iii interventions teaching appropriate behavior
Tier III Interventions: Teaching Appropriate Behavior
  • Behavioral Interventions in M-DCPS
    • Individualized Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)
    • Mentoring
    • Reinforced Practice
    • Role Play
eligibility for emotional behavioral disabilities
Eligibility for Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities
  • A student with an emotional/behavioral disability has persistentand consistent emotional or

behavioral responses that adversely effectsperformance in the educational environment that

cannot be attributed to age, culture, gender, or ethnicity.

  • The eligibility determination will be based upon the student’s response to behavioral interventions, (Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3) as well as the etiology of the emotional and/or behavioral difficulties.
what s next
What’s Next??
  • Determine the members of the RtI Leadership Team that will design and facilitate the RtIB process
  • Review data and use the problem solving process to define the problem and identify, implement and monitor interventions
levels of support for behavior1
Levels of Support for Behavior

Tier 3: Few Students

Tier 2: Small Groups of Students

Tier 1: All Students

67

rtib interventions
RtIB Interventions
  • Tier 3 Interventions
      • Individualized Behavior
      • Intervention Plan (BIP)
  • Mentoring
  • Reinforced Practice
  • Role Play
  • Tier 2 Interventions
  • The Center for Special Instruction (CSI) using academic and behavioral interventions
  • Group intervention sessions for specific topics such as coping skills, anger management, problem-solving and conflict resolution, substance abuse, violence prevention, grief, assertiveness, developmental issues and social skills.
  • Alternative to Suspension (Examples: Saturday school, after school, work detail)
  • School-based mentors
  • Second Step: A Violence Prevention Curriculum
  • Social Skills Training
  • Individual, family and group counseling
  • LEAPS
  • Behavioral Contracting
  • Tier 1 Interventions
    • Bullying / Violence Prevention
    • Curriculum
    • M-DCPS Alternative to
    • Suspension Program (ASP)
    • Crisis Prevention Planning
    • LEAPS
    • Positive Behavior Support
    • (PBS)
    • CHAMPS
contact information
Contact Information

Ms. Robin J. Morrison

Clinical Behavioral Services

rmorrison@dadeschools.net

305-995-1733