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Russlynn Ali – Director, The Education Trust-West October 26, 2005 PowerPoint Presentation
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Russlynn Ali – Director, The Education Trust-West October 26, 2005

Russlynn Ali – Director, The Education Trust-West October 26, 2005

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Russlynn Ali – Director, The Education Trust-West October 26, 2005

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  1. The Role and Responsibilities of District Leaders in Raising Reading Achievement and Closing Achievement Gaps for All Students Russlynn Ali – Director, The Education Trust-WestOctober 26, 2005

  2. Where Are We Now?US NAEP Long Term Trends

  3. Looking at National Long Term Trends, Achievement Gaps for Younger Hispanic and African American Students Are Narrowing

  4. African American-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds 26 35 29 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  5. Latino-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds 21 28 24 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  6. Middle School?

  7. 8th GradeNAEP Reading, 13 Year-Olds Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  8. Gaps Getting Bigger in Middle SchoolAfrican American-White Gap NAEP Reading, 13 Year-Olds 18 29 22 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  9. Latino-White Gap NAEP Reading, 13 Year-Olds 24 21 23 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  10. High School?

  11. NAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  12. Gaps Biggest in High School . . . and GrowingAfrican American-White GapNAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds 21 29 31

  13. Latino-White GapNAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds 22 24 29

  14. How is California Doing Relative to Other States?

  15. California’s NAEP Scores for 4th Grade Reading Lag Behind Other States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

  16. Latino 4th Grade Students – NAEP READING Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

  17. African American 4th Grade Students – NAEP READING Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

  18. And Let’s Be Clear. It’s Not Our Demographics.

  19. California’s White 4th Grade Students Are Closer to the US Average in Reading, But Still Behind Many States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

  20. California’s Asian 4th Grade Students Also Lag Behind Many States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

  21. White 8th Graders in California Read Below Their Peers in Other States

  22. When students’ family backgrounds were controlled for, California’s 2003 NAEP scores were the lowest in the nation. Source: California’s k-12 Public Schools: How Are They Doing, RAND, 2005

  23. How are California students doing on our own assessments?

  24. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS CST All Students 2005

  25. Underneath Those Averages, There are Wide Gaps.

  26. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS4th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2005

  27. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS4th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2005

  28. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS8th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2005

  29. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS8th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2005

  30. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS11th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2005

  31. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS11th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2005

  32. In the end, these gaps mean poor students and students of color are years behind their peers.

  33. African American and Latino 7th graders read at about the level of White 3rd graders CAT/6 2005

  34. Gaps grow wider the longer students remain in our schools. When do they start?

  35. Low income 3-year-olds have significantly smaller vocabularies than their more affluent peers. Source: Hart, B. & Risley, T.R. (1995). Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experiences of Young American Children excerpted in American Educator, Spring 2003.

  36. Black and Hispanic children are significantly less likely than White children to know their letters when they enter kindergarten. Percent of children Source: America’s Kindergartners. NCES 2000-070.

  37. Are Gaps Closing Over Time in California?

  38. Achievement Gaps Hold SteadyALL CA STUDENTS, GRADES 2-11- English CST Latino-White Gap: 33 points Latino-White Gap: 34 points Source: California Dept of Education, 2005

  39. Now, the Most Important Questions. . .WHY?And What To Do About It?

  40. Learning and Spreading the Message:HOPE! There are high-poverty and high-minority schools all over the country that are closing opportunity gaps, raising achievement and narrowing achievement gaps. Learn what they’re doing. Celebrate their success.

  41. Closing the Black-White Gap

  42. A Tale of Two Schools in Merced County Source: California Department of Education http://www.cde.ca.gov

  43. A Tale of Two Schools in Merced County Source: California Department of Education http://www.cde.ca.gov

  44. A Tale of Two Schools in Merced County Source: California Department of Education http://www.cde.ca.gov

  45. A Tale of Two Schools in Merced County Source: California Department of Education http://www.cde.ca.gov

  46. A Tale of Two Schools in Merced County Source: California Department of Education http://www.cde.ca.gov

  47. A Tale of Two Schools in Merced County: 3rd Graders at Yamato Reading at the Level of 5th Graders at Sparkes Source: California Department of Education, 2004

  48. Dispelling the Myth in ReadingHolland ElementaryFresno Unified • 52% Latino • 100% Low-income • Surpassing state average in 4th Grade Reading Source: California Department of Education