Microsoft office 2003 illustrated introductory second edition
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Microsoft Office 2003- Illustrated Introductory, Second Edition. Getting. Started with Windows XP. Objectives. Start Windows and view the desktop Use the mouse Start a program Move and resize windows Use menus, keyboard shortcuts, and toolbars. Objectives. Use dialog boxes

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Microsoft office 2003 illustrated introductory second edition

Microsoft Office 2003- Illustrated Introductory, Second Edition

Getting

Started with Windows XP


Objectives Edition

  • Start Windows and view the desktop

  • Use the mouse

  • Start a program

  • Move and resize windows

  • Use menus, keyboard shortcuts, and toolbars

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Objectives Edition

  • Use dialog boxes

  • Use scroll bars

  • Use Windows Help and Support Center

  • Close a program and shut down Windows

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Unit introduction
Unit Introduction Edition

  • Microsoft Windows is an operating system program that controls:

    • The operation of computer

    • The display of information on your screen

    • Programs you run on your computer

      • Programs,also known as applications, are task-oriented software that help you to accomplish tasks such as word processing or using a spreadsheet

  • Windows also coordinates the flow of information among the programs, printers, storage devices, and other components

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Unit introduction cont
Unit Introduction (cont.) Edition

  • Windows helps you save and organize the results of your work as files

    • Files are electronic collections of data, each with its own unique filename

  • Icons in Windows are small pictures that are meaningful symbols of the items or tasks they represent

  • You will also use rectangular-shaped work areas, known as windows

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting windows and viewing the desktop
Starting Windows and EditionViewing the Desktop

  • The desktop is an on-screen version of an actual desk, containing windows, icons, files and programs

    • From the desktop, you can access, store, and share information on a computer, a network, or on the Internet

  • When you start Windows for the first time, the default settings are used, which are preset by the operating system

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting windows and viewing the desktop cont
Starting Windows and EditionViewing the Desktop (cont.)

Desktop background

  • Turn on your computer and monitor

  • Windows automatically starts and displays the desktop, or a logon screen where you must enter a password, then press [Enter]

Mouse pointer

Icon

Start button

Taskbar

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting windows and viewing the desktop cont1
Starting Windows and EditionViewing the Desktop (cont.)

  • Elements of a typical Windows desktop:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Accessing the internet from the desktop

Windows XP provides a seamless connection between the desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

IE is an example of a browser, a program designed to access the World Wide Web (aka the Web, or WWW)

You can access IE from the Start menu, or by clicking its icon on the desktop

You can use it to access Web pages and to place Web content on the desktop

Accessing the Internet from the Desktop

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse
Using the Mouse desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A mouse is a handheld input device that you roll across a flat surface to position the mouse pointer

  • Input, or pointing, devices come in many shapes and sizes

Intellimouse

Mouse with left and right buttons

Trackpoint

Touchpad

Trackball

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse cont
Using the Mouse (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

Right mouse button

  • A typical mouse has two buttons, although yours may differ:

    • Left button: used to select text or click icons

    • Right button: used to open a shortcut menu

Left mouse button

Shortcut menu

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse cont1
Using the Mouse (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A mouse pointer is a small symbol that indicates the pointer’s relative position on the desktop

  • To move the mouse pointer, locate it on the desktop, then move the mouse to reposition the mouse pointer where you want it

  • Basic mouse pointer shapes include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using the mouse cont2
Using the Mouse (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • Basic mouse techniques include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting a program
Starting a Program desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • Clicking the Start button on the taskbar opens the Start menu, which lists submenus for a variety of tasks:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Starting a program cont
Starting a Program (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

Submenu

  • Windows XP comes with several built-in programs called accessories, such as WordPad

  • To Start WordPad:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar

    • Point to All Programs

    • Point to Accessories

    • Click WordPad

Point to arrow to open submenu

Click to open WordPad

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Customizing the start menu
Customizing the Start Menu desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • You can change the way the Start menu looks and behaves, including making it have the look and feel of previous Windows versions (called Windows Classic)

  • To customize the Start menu:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Control Panel

    • In the Control Panel, click Switch to Classic View if necessary, then double-click the Taskbar and Start Menu icon

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Moving and resizing windows
Moving and Resizing Windows desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • You can open more than one window or program at a time

  • You can identify a window by the title bar, which shows the program and filename if applicable

  • Each window has a border that you can use to resize it and buttons to maximize or minimize it

  • The desktop can get cluttered, so you need to organize it by resizing or moving windows

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Moving and resizing windows cont
Moving and Resizing Windows (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • To resize a window using buttons, click the appropriate button in the upper-right corner of the window. To make it:

    • An icon on the taskbar, click the Minimize button

    • Fill the screen, click the Maximize button

    • Closed, click the Close button

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Moving and resizing windows cont1
Moving and Resizing Windows (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • To move a window, position the mouse pointer over the title bar, click the left mouse button, then drag the window to the new location

  • To resize a window using the mouse:

    • Position the pointer over an edge or a corner of the window until the pointer becomes a double-sided arrow

    • Click the left mouse button, then drag in the direction you want to resize the window

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


More about sizing windows

Some programs contain two sets of sizing buttons: desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

To see more than one window at a time, open the desired windows, right-click a blank area on the taskbar, then click a tiling option

More About Sizing Windows

The bottom set controls the file with which you are working

The top set controls the program

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using menus keyboard shortcuts and toolbars
Using Menus, Keyboard Shortcuts, and Toolbars desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A menu is a list of commands that you use to accomplish certain tasks

    • A checkmark or bullet mark indicates that a feature is enabled

      • To disable a checked feature, click the command again

      • To disable a bulleted feature, select another command

    • Typical menu items include:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using menus keyboard shortcuts and toolbars cont
Using Menus, Keyboard Shortcuts, and Toolbars (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A keyboard shortcut lets you press a button or combination of buttons to perform a task or navigate through a menu or dialog box

    • For example, press [Ctrl][C] to copy selected text in a document

  • On a menu, keyboard navigation indicators, underlined letters in a command name, can be used instead of the mouse to select items

    • For example, press [Alt][V] to open the View menu, then press [T] to open the Toolbars submenu

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using menus keyboard shortcuts and toolbars cont1
Using Menus, Keyboard Shortcuts, and Toolbars (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A toolbar contains buttons that are convenient shortcuts for menu commands

    • When you position the pointer over a button, a screen tip appears displaying the button name

    • To select a button, click it with the left mouse button

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using dialog boxes
Using Dialog Boxes desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A dialog box is a window that opens when you must supply more information before a command can be carried out

  • Dialog boxes:

    • Open when you choose a menu option that is followed by an ellipsis (…) or when you open an option from the Control Panel

    • May contain tabs at the top that separate commands into related categories

    • Can be closed by clicking OK to accept all of your changes, or by clicking Cancel to not make any changes

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using dialog boxes cont
Using Dialog Boxes (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • A sample dialog box:

Tab

Up and Down arrows

Check box

Command buttons

Option button

Text box

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using dialog boxes cont1
Using Dialog Boxes (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • Typical items in a dialog box:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using scroll bars
Using Scroll Bars desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • Scroll bars are vertical and horizontal bars that appear when you cannot see all of the items available in a window

Up scroll arrow

Vertical scroll box

Horizontal scroll box

Down scroll arrow

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using scroll bars cont
Using Scroll Bars (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • You can use scroll bars to:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support center
Using Windows Help desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)and Support Center

  • The Help and Support center is a complete resource of information, training, and support to help you use Windows XP

  • Help and Support is like a book stored on your computer, with additional links to the Internet, a search features, an index, and a table of contents

  • You can access context-sensitive help, which is help specifically related to the task you are doing

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support center cont
Using Windows Help and Support Center (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

Search text box

  • To use Help and Support:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Help and Support

    • The Help and Support Center window opens

    • In the Search text box, type the search criteria, then press [Enter]

Links for popular topics

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support center cont1
Using Windows Help and Support Center (cont.) desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

  • To use Help and Support (cont.)

    • A search pane opens, displaying results from the search in three areas: Suggested Topics; Full-text Search Matches; Microsoft Knowledge Base (only when connected to the Internet)

    • Click a topic, then click the Expand indicator next to the appropriate topic in the right pane

Right pane displays help on the topic you select

Search results

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Using windows help and support center cont2
Using Windows Help and desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)Support Center (cont.)

  • Click the buttons on the Help toolbar to:

    • Navigate back and forth between Help topics you have visited

    • Add a topic to the Favorites list so you can return to it later

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Other forms of help

To get help on a specific Windows program desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

Click Help on the menu bar

OR

Click the Help button in the upper-right corner of a dialog box, then click the mouse pointer on the item for which you need additional help

OR

Right-click an item in a dialog box, then click What’s This? to display an explanation

Other Forms of Help

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Closing a program and shutting down windows
Closing a Program and desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)Shutting Down Windows

  • Closing a program properly ensures that the file is saved

  • Shutting down the computer properly prevents loss of data and problems restarting Windows

  • Shutting down involves several steps:

    • Closing all open windows and programs

    • Shutting down Windows

    • Turning off the computer

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Closing a program and shutting down windows cont
Closing a Program and desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)Shutting Down Windows (cont.)

  • To close a program:

    • Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the window

      OR

    • Click File on the menu bar, then click Close or Exit

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Closing a program and shutting down windows cont1
Closing a Program and desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)Shutting Down Windows (cont.)

  • To shut down the computer:

    • Click the Start button on the taskbar, then click Turn Off Computer

    • In the Turn Off Computer dialog box, click Turn Off to exit Windows and shut down your computer

    • If you see the message “It’s now safe to turn off your computer,” turn off the computer and the monitor

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


Closing a program and shutting down windows cont2
Closing a Program and desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)Shutting Down Windows (cont.)

  • Turn off options:

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


The log off command

Logging off is used when you want to change users quickly desktop and the Internet with Internet Explorer (IE)

You can choose to switch users, which logs off the current user and allows another user to log on or simply log off

Windows shuts down partially

When a new user logs on by clicking a user name and entering a password, Windows restarts and the desktop reappears

The Log Off Command

Getting Started with Windows XP Unit A


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