keeping the play in learning games l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Keeping the Play in Learning Games PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Keeping the Play in Learning Games

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Keeping the Play in Learning Games - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 256 Views
  • Uploaded on

Keeping the Play in Learning Games —Scot Osterweil The Education Arcade/MIT September 28, 2006 scot_o@mit.edu Play, observable throughout the animal kingdom, is the fundamental way we learn.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Keeping the Play in Learning Games' - jana


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
keeping the play in learning games

Keeping the Play in Learning Games

—Scot Osterweil

The Education Arcade/MIT

September 28, 2006

scot_o@mit.edu

play observable throughout the animal kingdom is the fundamental way we learn

Play, observable throughout the animal kingdom, is the fundamental way we learn.

"Now in myth and ritual the great instinctive forces of civilized life have their origin: law and order, commerce and profit, craft and art, poetry, wisdom and science. All are rooted in the primeval soil of play."

—John Huizinga

Homo Ludens, 1938

An example with rods and clamps…

from The Children’s Machine,

Seymour Papert, 1993

slide4

Through the informal activity of play, we scaffold the concepts and ideas that we will engage with formally in school.

play has no agenda
Play has no agenda

The player’s motivations are entirely intrinsic and personal.

How do we channel play into learning activities while still allowing for play’s fundamentally open-ended nature?

GAMES

slide7
In games we willingly submit to arbitrary rules and structures in pursuit of mastery, but only if we can continue to be playful.

The promise of games is that they can structure real play with substance that we want the player to learn.

one example
One example

Zoombinis – a game about the math of the computer age: logic, combinatorics, discrete mathematics.

sim city
Sim City

A good engrossing game which meets the definition of structured play leading to mastery.

But What Do We Learn?

learning misconceptions
The built environment doesn’t just grow like weeds; it is the result of intentional, human efforts.

The process can be managed by a single intelligence.

Learning/Misconceptions
learning misconceptions12
There is cause and effect in the development of cities.

Cause and effect is either:

one-dimensional

or

a black box.

Learning/Misconceptions
learning misconceptions13
Good planning makes for a happier, more prosperous city.

This particular model of a happy city is somewhat suspect.

Learning/Misconceptions
slide14
Instead of: it can all be managed from the top down;

Why not: all good change is negotiated by a collective intelligence.

Computer vs. non-computer games.

computer vs non computer games
Computer vs. non-computer games

Computer games are good for computationally dense activities: simulations, war games, fast action, puzzles, or visual complexity.

Playing against other players introduces subtlety, unpredictability.

We learn cooperation, collaboration, negotiation. The skills we need as planners.

computer vs non computer games16
Computer vs. non-computer games

Thinking about the future: blending the best of both worlds

On-line communities: negotiation and collaboration

Computer generated challenges and visualizations

keeping the play in learning games17

Keeping the Play in Learning Games

—Scot Osterweil

The Education Arcade/MIT

September 28, 2006

scot_o@mit.edu