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A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS. CRISIS fighting for hope for homeless people. KS 3 Lesson Plan 1 Exploring the meaning of Home and Homelessness. For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947.

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crisis fighting for hope for homeless people

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

CRISIS fighting for hope for homeless people

KS 3 Lesson Plan 1

Exploring the meaning of Home and Homelessness

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947

learning objectives
At the end of the lesson you will be able to:

List the things that define ‘home’

Identify some causes and results of homelessness

Relate personally to homelessness

Keywords

Home, Homelessness, Maslow, Crisis, SmartMove

Learning Objectives

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947

slide3
Home

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

Activity 1: Defining Home

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947

activity 1 defining home
Home– the house, apartment, etc. where you live, especially

with your family. The place where you live or feel you belong

(Cambridge Dictionary)

Activity 1: Defining Home

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947

slide5
By her 16th birthday, Kate was already on the move: “At 14, I hightailed it… Do you know what, I don’t even think my mum knew I was gone. I thought, ‘she doesn’t care about me. So that’s it–I’m off’.”

Kate immersed herself in the ‘homeless lifestyle’. Hitch-hiking down to London aged 14, she spent the next 3 years in a squat, under the wing of a man who had befriended her when she first arrived in the capital: “I met a really nice man, who I told what had happened to me. He said, ‘Go home and sort it out’. I said ‘I can’t’. So after a while, he said, ‘OK, live with us in our squat’.”

Kate paid her way through a series of casual jobs until the squat was closed down when she was 17. She tried to contact her mother, but with no success. Kate was to spend the next 3 years stuck between the street, the hostel and the squat.

At 20, Kate spent 4 years travelling the country with a man, visiting seaside places during the summer for work, and spending the winter in London. At 25, Kate met another man. This relationship turned her towards drugs and resulted in physical and mental abuse until she had had enough of it.

Too old to stay on a friend’s floor, Kate was back on the streets; but she soon found a place in a London hostel: “I always seem to have people around me who know what’s good for me instead of me telling them what I would like. I just want my own space to do things my own way at my own pace. I wonder if this will ever happen.”

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

Case Study – Kate’s Story:

Why do people become homeless?

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.ukCharity number 1082947

activity 2 maslow s hierarchy of needs
In 1943 the psychologist Abraham Maslow put forward his theory of the hierarchy of needs. This theory is often shown as a pyramid.

He argued that humans must meet basic physical needs (hunger, sleep, safety) in order to be able to meet emotional needs (love, social relationships) in order to meet ‘higher’ needs (respect, ambition, creativity).

Activity 2: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947

slide7

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

Activity 2: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Actualization

(Ambition/

Creativity)

Esteem/(Self-)Respect

Love/Social Relationships

Safety

Physical

  • Do you think it is important to try to meet the ‘higher’ needs before the ‘lower’ needs have been met? Or is it just more difficult? Why do you think that is?

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947

slide8

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

  • If you became homeless, what would be your first priority? Write it down in the bottom space of the pyramid opposite.
  • Once you had met that need, what would you need next? Write that in the next space above. Continue until you have filled all the spaces in the pyramid.
  • How do the priorities in your pyramid compare to Maslow’s theory?

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.ukCharity number 1082947

slide9
Narinder lived with her parents and 2 younger sisters until she was 18. In the small house there were arguments all the time. Narinder shared a room with her sister but spent alternate nights sleeping in the lounge and in her bedroom. When Narinder was 17 she started suffering from severe stress; this manifested itself as anorexia and soon she weighed only 6 stone. Narinder's parents had wanted her to work and not study. She had many arguments with them. They repeatedly told her to move out.

She went to a local homeless action group which referred her to Crisis SmartMove, which decided to accept her as soon as she was 18. They found her accommodation after a couple of months, in a house shared with 2 other girls. Narinder would have her own room, there was Sky and a dishwasher–it seemed perfect.

Narinder moved in and now loves living there. Her health has improved and she has gained weight. She no longer feels depressed, and her relationships with her parents have improved. She spends some weekends at home.

Narinder just needed distance. Now she has her own accommodation she has decided to go back to college, studying a performing arts course. She has taken control of her life, dealing with benefit applications and other responsibilities with the help of SmartMove. Narinder has learned to do lots of practical things like cooking and cleaning. She feels really grown-up. "I remember I used to think that I couldn't see anything good in my life and I didn't know why I was alive. Now I know the future looks good.”

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

Case Study – Narinder’s Story:

Avoiding Homelessness

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.ukCharity number 1082947

slide10
SmartMove is a rent deposit scheme run by Crisis in partnership with local homeless agencies all over the country. It helps to provide non-statutory homeless people with access to good quality accommodation in the private sector.

Since its launch in 1997, Crisis SmartMove has helped 10,000 people into housing.

For more information visit www.crisis.org.uk/smartmove or contact smart.move@crisis.org.uk

A Teaching Resource for Secondary Schools provided by CRISIS

Plenary: SmartMove

For more information and Teacher Resource Sheets from CRISIS please visit www.crisis.org.uk Charity number 1082947