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Water Conservation and Recycling Roundtable
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  1. Water Conservation and Recycling Roundtable Martha Davis Inland Empire Utilities Agency April 8, 2010

  2. Inland Empire Utilities Agency Is a Municipal Water District serving 242 square miles of the Chino Basin in the western portion of San Bernardino County Provides regional wastewater service and distributes wholesale water and recycled water • 800,000 residents served • Five regional wastewater treatment plants (current flow (60 mgd) • Two non-reclaimable wastewater sewer pipeline systems • Operates, with LACSD, largest enclosed composter in State for biosolids processing • Produces recycled water, compost and renewable energy

  3. What happens while Delta is Being Fixed? + Ongoing (increasing?) regulatory constraints on imported water diversions + Climate change impacts on water supplies + Variable weather/more intense droughts + Time needed to build delta improvements? + Increasing and competing water needs throughout California = Need for more flexibility throughout SWP system

  4. Water Assets of the Chino Basin • Groundwater • 5-7 Million Acre-feet of Storage – one of the largest groundwater basins in southern California • 1 million acre-feet of unused storage capacity currently • Safe Yield of 140,000+ Acre-feet per year with capacity to increase • Over 800 Active Wells • High quality Recycled Water • Over 90,000 Acre-feet of water available for reuse • Storm Water Capture • Region now loses over 40,000 acre-feet per year on average of water that historically recharged the Chino Groundwater Basin • Opportunities for Water Efficiency • Over 60% of water use within region is for outdoor irrigation • Regional Partnerships • Outstanding collaboration and cooperation among local governments and agencies providing water services

  5. IEUA Recycled Water Usage Actual and Planned

  6. Groundwater Recharge • Recharge Sites • 19 Sites throughout Chino Basin • Sources of Water • Stormwater & Local Runoff • Imported Water (MWD) • Recycled Water • Natural Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) • Confidence of Regulators • Recharge Basin Operations & Maintenance (O&M)

  7. Projected Chino Basin Imported Water Demands • Without the Integrated Water Management Strategy, the need for expensive imported water is expected to increase from 60,000 acre-feet to over 150,000 acre-feet • With the implemented of the planned water initiatives, the region will significantly reduce it need for imported water and during dry years almost completely roll off imported water supplies

  8. Energy Intensity of Water Supplies is Important! ….Southern California Has the Greatest Opportunity for Water Projects that Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  9. IEUA Renewable Energy Initiatives Goal: Go Gridless by 2020 ( esti. 20 MW) 3.5 MW Solar Installed – More being planned Anaerobic Digesters/Methane Gas Fuel Cell Wind In Conduit Hydro Energy efficiency

  10. IEUA Water/Energy Savings • By 2025, IEUA expects that its service area will be able to meet nearly 80% of water needs through local sources (currently at 70%) • Full service imported water supplies are expected to remain roughly at the same level as 2005 or to decline slightly • Conservation – 33,000 acre-feet (10% of demand) • Recycled water – 90,000 acre-feet • Groundwater production – 200,000 acre-feet • Desalted groundwater – 40,000 acre-feet Replacement of imported water with local sources is projected to save over 225,000 MWh/year by 2025. The greenhouse gas emission reductions attributed to local development and use of recycled water alone is roughly 100,000 tons of CO2 equivalents per year.

  11. Questions?