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http://www.acpa.nche.edu/pgp/principle.htm Student Affairs and Technology EDAD 67842/74298 Web Section SPRING 2004 THURSDAYS 1:00 - 3:30 p.m. _________________________________________________________ Course Overview

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Student Affairs and Technology

  • EDAD 67842/74298
  • Web Section
  • SPRING 2004
  • THURSDAYS 1:00 - 3:30 p.m.
  • _________________________________________________________
  • Course Overview
  • The Manual processes our institutions followed for decades now have new applications for financial management,
  • human resources, admission, recruitment, payments, procurement, research databases, course management, online
  • library services, classroom scheduling, patient records, grants, and of course email (Lightfoot& Ihrig, 2002). The
  • bandwidth of computer networks has increased at an even faster rate (a thousand fold in just the last decade, and
  • the traffic of the Internet continues to double every one hundred days (Lightfoot & Ihrig, 2002). For the
  • foreseeable future all of these trends will continue. The question will be how higher education institutions
  • respond to theses changes. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of Technology and
  • Student Affairs.
  • Learning Outcomes
  • Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be able to demonstrate how technology relates to the
  • Seven Principles of Good Practice for Student Affairs: http://www.acpa.nche.edu/pgp/principle.htm
  • Participants of this course will explore how technology engages students in active learning.
  • Participants of this course will explore how technology helps students build coherent values and ethical standards.
  • Participants of this course will explore how technology sets high expectations for students and student affairs practitioners.
  • Participants of this course will explore how technologyuses systematic inquiry to improve student and institutional performance.
  • Participants of this course will explore how technologyprovides leadership and efficient use of resources to help achieve the institution's mission and goals.
  • Participants of this course will explore how technologyforges educational partnerships.
  • Participants of this course will explore how technologybuilds supportive and inclusive communities
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Page 2 of 19

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Students are expected to keep abreast of current events within higher education and are therefore expected to

Review The Chronicle of Higher Education on a weekly basis. Student subscriptions will be made available on

the 1st day of class.

Memberships

As a student affairs professional you are expected to participate in one of the numerous professional

organizations. There are two comprehensive organization ACPA (http://www.acpa.nche.edu/) and NASPA

(http://www.naspa.org) as well as organizations for many of the individual units within the profession

(admissions, residence life, financial aid, student activities, etc.). Student discounts are available for most

professional organizations

Assignments

Assignments are due as noted in the syllabus. Late assignments will receive a one-letter grade reduction for each

week it is delayed. All written assignments are to be double-spaced, 12 point font, 1 in. margins and follow APA

style guidelines (5th edition).

Grading

1)Participation – your participation and contributions to the learning of your classmates is critical to everyone’s

success. (20%)Students are expected to actively and responsibly participate in class activities and discussion by

adding meaningful and relevant comments or asking probing, thoughtful questions. (Student affairs professionals

are expected to think on their feet.) Web students will post a one page reflection of each weekly reading and will

post one unanswered question for each reading. All students (Web and in-class) are expected to respond to these

questions

2)Paper & Presentation- This will be a team or individual paper and presentation (30%). Teams may consist of

2-3 individuals from this course. You will write a comprehensive research paper on a functional area in Student

Affairs (Financial Aid, Career Services, Admissions, Health Services, etc…) and how they utilize technology.

3)Three Quizzes/Tests (TBA)The quizzes will be given via WebCT (20%).One weeks notice will be given prior

to the quiz.

.

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Page 3 of 19

  • Week One
  • Introductions, Overview, and Expectations
  • Student Objectives: Students enrolled in this class will write a list of learning outcomes they hope to gain from the class.
  • Today’s Emerging Information Technologies –DISCUSSION
  • Colleges and universities are information organizations that provide people with the resources they need to make decisions or take action ( select a major, enroll for a course, procure supplies, and register for health programs). Emerging information technologies are triggering significant changes in the kinds of learners served by colleges and universities, how courses and programs of study are delivered, and even the way in which teaching staffs and organization structures are configured. The demand for information goods and services is on a rise because knowledge can lead to prosperity. In such an environment , the demand for higher quality innovative information services is expanding. Traditional technologies included face-to-face instruction, printed text, radio and television transmission, and audio and video recordings. Digital forms of traditional technologies are now converting to the Internet. Singleton and Mast (2000) claim that Internet technology is spreading to the general population far faster than did automobiles, telephones, radios, electricity, television, VCRs, or microwave ovens. Higher education must stay attuned to multiple trends in the environment and must attempt multiple experiments to see which ones work. Article Discussion :Leadership and Technology: Ten Thoughts by Daniel Salter - http://studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Winter_2001/thoughts.html
  • Readings:
  • http://www.acpa.nche.edu/pgp/principle.html - Principles of Good Practice for Student Affairs
  • http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejounal/barrat2.html- Four Elements of Information Technology in Student Affairs by William Barrat
  • http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejounal/barrat1.html - ACPA Task Force on Information Technology in Student Affairs by William Barrat
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Page 4 of 19

Week Two

The Internet

The Internet, A Major Change Technology Change Factor in Higher Education

DISCUSSION

The attraction to the Internet is driven by its convenience, speed, and customization of

information. Marcia Bates, faculty member of the UCLA School of Information Studies,

indicates the simplicity and ubiquity of the Web is approaching the pint at which effort

required to research for information equals the “least effort” that most people are willing to

expend (Bates, 2000 as cited in Hughes, 2000). According to Bates’s keynote address at

Queensland Open Learning Network, information technologies have enables higher

education to (1) expand access to education and training, (2) raise the quality of education, (3)

lower the cost of higher education, (4) increase the cost-effectiveness of education, (5) expand

the number of courses and programs, and (6) generated higher levels of tuition-based revenues

(Bates, 1996 as cited in Cookson, 2000). Except for the prestigious conventional institutions

for which there is no shortage of demand from full-time resident students, universities that

ignore the new knowledge media may go the way of the dinosaurs (Downes,1998 as cited in

Cookson 2000).

Readings

http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/kinser.htmlUsing Internet Chat Rooms to Study

Student Culture by Kevin Kinser, John Mueller and Jayne E. Brownell

http://curly.cis.unf.edu/talks/stuaff.html The New Society of the Internet and How It May

Affect Student Affairs Departments Dr. F. Layne Wallace

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Page 5 of 19

Week Three

Desktop Applications-DISCUSSION

PLAN: An overview will be given of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Access and their applications. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with the programs

Word: Word processing, letter writing, web pages

Excel: Spreadsheets, budgets

PowerPoint: Presentations

Publisher: Publications, newsletters, graphics

Access: Database, inventory

OUTCOMES: Students will become comfortable with each program and its applications. Students will also have the opportunity to become certified in each program.

N: An overview will be given of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Access and their applications. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with the programs

Word: Word processing, letter writing, web pages

Excel: Spreadsheets, budgets

PowerPoint: Presentations

Publisher: Publications, newsletters, graphics

Access: Database, inventory

OUTCOMES: Students will become comfortable with each program and its applications. Students will also have the opportunity to become certified in each program.

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Page 6 of 19

Week Four

Technology in Higher Education Institutions- Public, Private, and Community

Community Colleges-DISCUSSION

Community Colleges are designed for convenience and easy access for local residence to take advantage of higher education. Floyd (2003) explains that community colleges have lead the way in making opportunities for higher learning available, affordable, and service orientated , which overall gives them the reputation of the “peoples college.” Garmon (2000) states that open-access and Internet education courses have made community colleges more competitive in higher education. The technology revolution has ultimately affected community colleges in a positive way by meeting the demanding needs of non-traditional students. The Internet has also served as a direct replacement for the telephone and face-to-face communication. Students’ general questions can be answered right on the home page of their community college.

Private Higher Education Institutions - DISCUSSION

Private liberal arts colleges are struggling to integrate information technology into both their administration and academic environments. Small colleges are harder pressed to find sufficient funds to cover large scale IT implementations. Kelly (2000) argues that institutional planning must integrate the rapidly changing technology environment in order to fulfill its liberal arts mission and that computer hardware and software must be a component of the colleges’ regular operating budget

Public Higher Education Institutions- DISCUSSION

Recent Studies suggest that teaching the same number of students online at the same level of quality as in the classroom requires more time and money (Marcus, 2000). Public colleges will spend more than twice as much as private colleges on academic hardware, a difference that reflects larger enrollments and government support of public institutions.

Assignment:

Write a brief summary of a self-chosen article related to today’s topic (Technology in Higher Education Institutions- Public, Private, and Community). Your summary should include your own thoughts of the article (agree or disagree, why?). Post your summary on WebCt by Week Four.

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Page 7 of 19

Week Five

Meeting Students’ Needs Through Technology

Meetings Students’ Needs in the Classroom Through Technology-DISCUSSION

Using distance learning to develop diversity in the classroom.

(Lagier, 2003)

Using distance learning to reach a new student population. (Lagier, 2003)

Distance learning as it relates to disabled student access and the ADA. (Wall & Sarver, 2003)

It is expected that the students will understand how technology can be used to enhance the culture of a classroom and how it can be used to broaden educational access to students who may be disabled, in remote geographical areas, or in homogenous education settings. It is expected the students will have a basic understanding of the legal expectations being placed on technology by the ADA and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Readings:

Students are asked to bring in a recent article about technology and higher education to contribute to the discussion.

Lagier, J. (2003). Distance learning and the minority student: special needs and opportunities. The Internet and Higher Education, 6, 179-184.

Wall, P. S., & Sarver, L. (2003). Disabled student access in an era of technology. The Internet and Higher Education, 6, 277-284.

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Page 8 of 19

Week Six

Functional Areas of Student Affairs and Technology

How does technology affect student affairs? - Discussion

Groups will present on the functional area they were assigned to investigate. Projects should emphasize the impact of technology on their assigned area.

Today’s areas: Admissions, Career Services, Counseling and Orientation

It is expected the students will understand how technology alters the landscape of the functional areas in which they may want to work as graduates.

Readings:

Read chapters 3, 5, 6, and 9 in Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education 2nd Ed. by Audrey L. Rentz and Associates, 1996

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Page 9 of 19

Week Seven

Functional Areas of Student Affairs and Technology (continued)

How does technology affect student affairs? – Discussion

Groups will present on the functional area they were assigned to investigate. Projects should emphasize the impact of technology on their assigned areas.

Today’s areas: Residence Life, Financial Aid, Health Services and Student Activities

It is expected the students will understand how technology alters the landscape of the functional areas in which they may want to work as graduates

Reading:

Chapters 10, 11, 12, and 13 in Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education Second Edition by Audrey L. Rentz and Associates, 1996.

Last week for in-class sessions! All classes from this date on will be conducted over the web.

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Page 10 of 19

Week Eight

Distance Learning: Online Courses and Degree Granting Institutions

DISCUSSION: Online Chat

As the use of technology changes, so does how universities use it. Students will discuss questions such as:

Does distance learning have a target audience? If so, who?

Is distance learning a valid method of education, an industry, or a “degree mill”?

What is the implication for student affairs practitioners as online courses grow in popularity? How could your functional area change?

Should standards and accreditation be implemented for distance courses and online degree granting institutions?

Readings:

Aragon, S.R., Johnson, S.D., Shaik, N. (2002). The influence of learning style preferences on student success in online versus face-to-face environments. American Journal of DistanceEducation. 16(4), 227-245.

Marklein, M.B. September 24, 2002. Retrieved February 2004 from http://80-search.epnet.com.proxy.ohiolink.edu:9099/direct.asp?an=J0E405858325002&db=aph>.

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Page 11 of 19

Week Nine

FERPA: Legal and Ethical Implications of Technology

DISCUSSION

Students will get an introduction to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Based upon the reading and discussion, students will understand what qualifies as a student record and how electronic records are included. They will also learn about who has legal access to the record and why electronic records may be a threat to student privacy.

Readings:

Thomas, S. (2003) Privacy and Student Records. WebCT Online, 1-22.

Rezmierski, V. E., &  Seese, R. (2002). Does Information Contained in Systems Logs at Colleges and Universities Constitute Education Records?. College and University, 78(1), 3-11.

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Page 12 of 19

Week Ten

Learning Outcomes and Assessment

Learning Outcomes and Assessment for Technology-Discussion

How do you determine the effectiveness of technology in use?

What are the criteria for evaluation?

Students will be made aware that technology must be monitored and assessed to determine if it’s effects on students are desirable.

Reading: Read the following articles:

Davidson, M. M. (2001). The computerization of career services: critical issues to consider. Journal of Career Development, 27(3), 217-228.

Zhao, F. (2003). Enhancing the quality of online higher education through measurement. Quality Assurance in Higher Education, 11(4), 214-221.

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Page 13 of 19

Week Eleven

Future Trends

Future Trends in Student Affairs-DISCUSSION

It is evident that technology has played and ever-changing role in the field of higher education. The attraction to the Internet is continually driven by its convenience, speed, and customization of information. Student affairs professionals and administrators have already begun tapping into this resource in a variety of ways, whether it is online registration, bursar account access, financial aid information, academic research , or simply discovering the dimensions of a residence hall room.

The emergence of technology accompanies a change in what used be the average college student. The contemporary college student balances class, studying, work, as well as a social life that may or may not exist on campus. Technology, through its various forms, is considered to be the link that holds the current and the future student populations together. In coming years, student affairs professional will need to reconsider their roles and purposes on college campuses. Technology will affect each aspect of student services in one way or another. Incorporating new models of how to include technology in various aspects of higher education will also be dependant upon the type of institution.

Readings:

http://www.acpa.nche.edu/seniorscholars/trends/trends5.html- Looking Beyond the Horizon: Trends Shaping Student Affairs Technology by Upcraft, Terenzini, and Kruger

http://www.acpa.nche.edu/seniorscholars/trends/trends4.htms- Learning and Teaching in the 21st Century: Rends and Implications for Practice by Baxter, Terenzini, and Pat Hutchings

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Page 14 of 19

Week Twelve

Cost of Technology

Costs Associated with Technology-Discussion

Students will discuss the assigned articles via a web discussion and postings on WebCT. Students will also post their prepared budgets and discuss them online.

Students will have a better understanding of the financial costs of technology in higher education. They will be able to evaluate critical components of technology and where money should be invested along with investigating potential challenges.

Reading: Students will prepare and defend a budget for technology services.

Twigg,C.A. (2003).Improving quality and reducing cost: designs for effective learning. Change, 35, 22-29.

Andrus, A. (2003). Total cost of technology ownership: doing it right. School Business Affairs, 69, 35-36.

Olsen, F. (2002, October 4). 10 ways colleges can cut IT costs. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 49, A39.

Carlson, S. (2001, March 16). A small college’s mixed results with technology. The Chronicle of Higher Education, A35.

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Page 15 of 19

Week Thirteen

Seven Principles for Good Practice in Student Affairs

Seven Principles for Good Practice as Applied to Technology Usage-Discussion

PLAN: Students will discuss the relation of technology and the Seven Principles of Good Practice for Student Affairs via a web discussions and postings.

Students will examine and analyze the role technology plays in student affairs through an online discussion format. It is understood that students will gain experience utilizing distance learning so that they mat better understand their constituents.

Reading: Seven Principles of Good Practice for Student Affairs

http://www.acpa.nche.edu/pgp/principle.htm

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Page 16 of 19

Week Fourteen

Evaluation of Course

Students will prepare a reflection of the class. Points of discussion should include reflection on in-class versus online-class experience, positions on currents issues with technology and student affairs (i.e. distance learning,) and an overall evaluation of the class. Students should have a better understanding of how technology affects all aspects of University affairs and their future career endeavors.

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Page 17 of 17

References and Recommended Readings

Andrus, A. (2003). Total cost of technology ownership: doing it right. School Business Affairs, 69, 35-36.

Aragon, S.R., Johnson, S.D., Shaik, N. (2002). The influence of learning style preferences on student success in

online versus face-to-face environments. American Journal of DistanceEducation. 16(4), 227-245.

Bates, Marcia. (2000, October). “Shaping our own future.” Libraries are us: Images and realities. Paper presented at the 2000 California ACRL conference.

Bates, T. (1996). The impact of technological change on open and distance learning. Keynote address at Queensland Open Learning Network. Retrieved December 4-6, 1999 from

http://bates.cstudies.ubc.ca/brisbane.html.

Carlson, S. (2001, March 16). A small college’s mixed results with technology. The Chronicle of Higher Education, A35.

Cookson, Peter. (2000, February). Implications of internet technologies for higher education: North american perspectives. Open Learning, 15 (1), 71-81.

Coomes, M.D. (2000). Book review: Using technology to promote student learning: Opportunities for today and tomorrow. NASPA Journal, 38(1), 152-157.

Davidson, M. M. (2001). The computerization of career services: critical issues to consider. Journal of Career Development, 27(3), 217-228.

Downes, J. S. (1998). The future of online learning. Retrieved December 9, 1999, from http://www.atl.ualberta.ca/downes/future.

Floyd, D. (2003). Distance learning in community colleges: leadership challenges for

Change and development. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 26, 332-347.

Garmon, J. (2000, August 7). The key to community college success. Community

College Weekly, 12 (26), 4.

Hughs, Carol Ann. (2000, December). Information services for higher education: A new

Competitive space. Retrieved September 23, 2003, from

http://www.dlib.org/december00/hughes/12hughes.html

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Page 17 of 17

References and Recommended Readings

Kelley, T. D. (2000). Liberal arts education and information technology: Time

for another renewal. Educause Quarterly, Number 4, 42 –46.

Kretovics, M. (2003). Organization and Administration of Higher Education Syllabus.

Lagier, J. (2003). Distance learning and the minority student: special needs and opportunities. The Internet and Higher Education, 6, 179-184.

Lightfoot, Ed and Ihrig, Weldon. (2002). The network generation infrastructure.

Educause Quarterly, 1, 52-61.

Marklein, M.B. September 24, 2002. Retrieved February 2004 from http://80-search.epnet.com.proxy.ohiolink.edu:9099/direct.asp?an=J0E405858325002&db=aph>.

Olsen, F. (2002, October 4). 10 ways colleges can cut IT costs. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 49, A39.

Rentz, A. L. & Associates (1996). Student affairs practice in higher education (2nd ed.). Illinois: Charles C. Thomas.

Rezmierski, V. E., &  Seese, R. (2002). Does Information Contained in Systems Logs at Colleges and Universities Constitute Education Records?. College and University, 78(1), 3-11.

Singeleton, Solverg and Mast, Lucas. How does the empty glass fill? A modern

philosophy if the digital divide. Educause Quarterly, 6, 30-36.

Thomas, S. (2003) Privacy and Student Records. WebCT Online, 1-22.

Twigg,C.A. (2003).Improving quality and reducing cost: designs for effective learning. Change, 35, 22-29.

Wall, P. S., & Sarver, L. (2003). Disabled student access in an era of technology. The Internet and Higher Education, 6, 277-284.

Zhao, F. (2003). Enhancing the quality of online higher education through measurement. Quality Assurance in Higher Education, 11(4), 214-221.