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The Bicycle as a Means of Transportation

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BIKE COMMUTING. The Bicycle as a Means of Transportation.

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BIKE COMMUTING

The Bicycle as a Means of Transportation

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This presentation is courtesy of the League of Michigan Bicyclists. LMB is a member supported not-for-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of bicycling and the safety of bicyclists on the roadways in Michigan since in 1981.

bike commuting
Bike Commuting

Assumptions:

  • You own a bicycle
  • You know how to ride a bicycle
  • You know that bicyclist are to ride with traffic … contrary to what you may have been taught in school
bike commuting1
Bike Commuting

Why do you want to Bike Commute?

  • Save money on gas
  • Health
  • Environment
myth only the fit and trim among us have enough strength and stamina to bike commute

MYTH: Only the fit and trim among us have enough strength and stamina to Bike commute.

REALITY: Bicycling is one of the easiest activities because of the gearing of the bike. In addition, there is no rule that says you must commute the entire route. Something is better than nothing.

myth one cannot be professional looking and a bicycle commuter

MYTH: One cannot be professional looking and a bicycle commuter.

REALITY: Many professionals in all levels of industry bike commute. It just takes a little extra planning and adaptation.

myth i become too wet or smelly from riding so i need a shower when i get there

MYTH: I become too "wet" or "smelly" from riding so I need a shower when I get there.

REALITY: Very few days in Michigan are hot in the early morning. Save the race speed for the trip home!

myth you need a great bike to commute

MYTH: You need a great bike to commute.

REALITY: Many bicyclists use a very ordinary bike to commute, and keep their fancy ones for tours, or racing. The more ordinary the bike is, the less likely it is to get stolen.

myth one needs sidewalks bike paths and trails to safely ride even to work

MYTH: One needs sidewalks, bike paths and trails to safely ride, even to work.

REALITY: Sidewalks are statistically more dangerous. Bike paths are only useful if they go to where you are going. A little planning will put you on backstreets and parallel routes that are safe.

it s the law
It’s the Law!
  • A bicyclist has the same rights and duties as a motor vehicle
  • Ride to the right ... Exceptions include:
    • Turning Left
    • Passing
    • When unsafe
    • Straight at right turn lane
    • One way street
  • Signal Turns
  • Obey Traffic Signals
rider etiquette
Rider Etiquette
  • Hand signals
rider etiquette1
Rider Etiquette
  • Hand signals
rider etiquette2
Rider Etiquette
  • Hand signals
rider etiquette3
Rider Etiquette
  • Hand signals
rider etiquette4
Rider Etiquette
  • Hand signals
  • Trail/sidewalk
    • When passing – call out “on your left”
    • Yield to pedestrians
  • Communication
    • Greet other bicyclists with a hello and a wave
sharing the road
Sharing the Road

Bike lanes& striped shoulders

  • Middle of lane – leave room to escape
sharing the road1
Sharing the Road

No bike lanes (shared roadway)

Don’t hug the edge

Rule of thumb

– ride in car’s right tire path

sharing the road2
Sharing the Road

How to safely traverse intersections

  • Straight
sharing the road3
Sharing the Road

How to safely traverse intersections

  • Right
sharing the road4
Sharing the Road

How to safely traverse intersections

  • Left
sharing the road5
Sharing the Road

How to deal with right turn lanes

Shared Roadway

Bike Lane

sharing the road6
Sharing the Road
  • Bicyclists should ride straight, not dodging between parked cars
  • Bicyclists should ride 3-4’ from car where door may open
sharing the road7
Sharing the Road

Trail/Sidewalk Cautions at intersections

Car B crosses sidepath, turning right:

  • Rarely stops at stopline, usually in crosswalk or at street edge
  • May not even stop
  • Often will only look left
  • Might see Cyclist 2,
  • Less likely to see Cyclist 1
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Trail/Sidewalk Cautions at intersections

Car A turning right:

  • Might see Cyclist 1
  • Less likely to see Cyclist 2
  • Many will not yield right-of-way
  • Faster turning speeds increase the chance of a collision
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Trail/Sidewalk Cautions at intersections

Car C looks ahead, not where the cyclist is on the path, waits for gap to turn left, accelerates through turn

  • Might see Cyclist 4,
  • Unlikely to see Cyclist 3
  • If traffic gap is short, sudden stops would be difficult
traffic signals
Traffic Signals

How to make traffic signals turn green

  • Many traffic signals are triggered by electrically charged wires buried under the pavement.
  • When a vehicle stops over them it disrupts the current.
  • Most bicycles contain enough metal to trigger the light.
  • You need to know where the most sensitive spots are.
traffic signals1
Traffic Signals
  • Look for cut lines in the pavement.
  • The most sensitive spots are:
    • Diamonds: just inside one of the points
traffic signals2
Traffic Signals
  • Rectangles: up front in the middle
traffic signals3
Traffic Signals
  • Circles: about a quarter of the way in
traffic signals4
Traffic Signals
  • The most sensitive spots are:
    • Diamonds: just inside one of the points
    • Rectangles: up front in the middle
    • Circles: about a quarter of the way in
  • Some signals are tripped by motion sensors, which can easily sense a bicycle.
where to ride
Where to Ride

Precautions

  • Pedestrians
  • Wind
  • Rain
  • Wet roads
  • Snow/ice
  • Dogs
where to ride2
Where to Ride
  • Alternatives to busy roads
  • Resources to map your route
    • Local bike route maps
    • State Maps:
      • http://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,1607,7-151-9615_11223-22734--,00.html
    • Mapping Program:
      • http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/
bike fit1
Bike Fit
  • Seat Height
bike fit2
Bike Fit
  • Weight distribution (Rule of thumb - 2/3 on saddle and 1/3 on handlebars)

Adjust seat distance to handlebars

basic maintenance
Basic Maintenance
  • Local bike shop
  • A-B-C Quik Check
  • Fixing a flat
a is for air
Ais for “air”
  • Tire Wear
  • Air pressure
  • Spokes
  • Rims
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Bis for “brakes”

  • Adjustment
  • Cables
  • Pads
  • Crud build up
slide45

Cis for “chain”

  • Lubricated
  • Cranks & Chainring
  • Cassette
  • Drive train shifting
slide46
Quik
  • Quik releases and axle nuts
check
Check
  • Check to make sure everything works properly within the 1st block of your trip
on road repairs
On Road Repairs

Basic tools to carry

how to fix a flat
How to fix a flat

ReleaseBrakes

Remove Wheel

Remove Tire

Remove Tube

how to fix a flat1
How to fix a flat

Check tire for embedded objects

Put Tire Back on Rim

Install new tube

Inflate tube to pressure on side of tire

how to fix a flat2
How to fix a flat

Put Wheel Back on Bike

Re-attach brakes

how to carry stuff
How to carry “stuff”

Back pack

Messenger bag

how to carry stuff2
How to carry “stuff”

Panniers

Handlebar bag

tires
Tires

Personal choice based on type of bike you are riding and conditions of roads. Commuters ride on all types.

  • Knobby vs slick (semi-slick)
  • Narrow vs wide
  • High pressure vs low pressure
  • Lightweight vs heavy duty
optional equipment
Optional Equipment
  • Fenders
          • Rear rack
optional equipment1
Optional Equipment
  • Water bottle

& cage

          • Bike computer
optional equipment2
Optional Equipment
  • Mirror
          • Bike bell
how to outfit yourself
How to outfit yourself
  • Helmet
  • Proper Fit
how to outfit yourself1
How to outfit yourself

Basic clothing

  • Highly visible
  • Lightweight and comfortable

Optional clothing

  • Bike shorts
  • Bike Gloves
  • Pant straps
  • Bike shoes
  • Rain gear
  • Safety vest
how to outfit yourself2
How to outfit yourself

Cold weather considerations

  • Layers
  • Head
  • Feet
  • Hands
how to pack stuff
How to pack “Stuff”
  • Clothes
    • Water proof bag
how to pack stuff1
How to pack “Stuff”
  • Clothes
    • Water proof bag
    • Roll
how to pack stuff2
How to pack “Stuff”
  • Clothes
    • Water proof bag
    • Roll
    • Permanent press/wrinkle free – carry on bike
    • Dry cleaned or ironed – carry in car
  • Items best to leave at your place of work
    • Shoes
    • Toiletry items
  • Keys, wallet, cell phone, glasses, etc.
  • Laptops and/or file folders
how to clean up
How to Clean Up

Showers available

Bathroom sink

how to clean up1
How to Clean Up

Facial wipes

Casual look

bike parking
Bike Parking

Secure indoor spot

bike parking1
Bike Parking

Outside parking

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“We hope that you enjoyed this Bicycle Commuting power point from the League of Michigan Bicyclists. Our purpose is to improve bicycle safety for everyone who rides in Michigan!”

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League of Michigan Bicyclists

www.lmb.org 888-642-4537