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Introduction to Poetry. A Quickwrite to get us started:. What is it that makes a piece of writing “poetry”? (“Prose” is writing that is not poetry.) This will not be collected, but keep your response in a safe place. You may need it later. Extra Credit Poetry Reading.

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Introduction to Poetry


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    1. Introduction to Poetry

    2. A Quickwrite to get us started: • What is it that makes a piece of writing “poetry”? (“Prose” is writing that is not poetry.) • This will not be collected, but keep your response in a safe place. You may need it later.

    3. Extra Credit Poetry Reading • For extra credit, I asked the class to bring a favorite poem to class with a typed paragraph about why the poem is a favorite. • To get the extra credit you must read the poem you brought (or part of it if it is excessively long). • You must also briefly share your reasons for choosing it with the class. • Make sure to turn in your paragraph to me by the end of class to get the extra credit you have earned.

    4. "Introduction to Poetry" p. 686 • To whom is this poem addressed? (And who is "them"?) • What does the speaker want? What actually happens? • What figures of speech are very common in this poem? Why?

    5. Some suggestions for reading a poem for this class: • Read it aloud. Poetry was meant to be heard. Pay attention to punctuation. Don't stop at the end of the line just because it's the end of a line. Try reading it different ways. • Familiarize yourself with new vocabulary. • Paraphrase the poem in your own words sentence-by-sentence if the meaning is difficult to unravel. • Pay attention to places that strike you as particularly meaningful or beautiful. Mark them, highlight them, and write about them. • Pay attention to places that seem to encapsulate or focus meaning. • Try to identify themes and sources of tension in the poem. Look for word choices, rhymes, images that enhance theme or conflict.

    6. Three More Poems about Poetry • "Poetry" p. 469 • "Ars Poetica" p. 709 • "Selecting a Reader" p. 707 • We will read each of these aloud as a class and answer the following questions: • What is the speaker’s point of view about poetry? • What lines strike you as beautiful or interesting? • In what ways are these poems similar/different?

    7. Just a Heads Up… • For the first fifteen minutes of class next time, I will be asking you a question about the four poems we read today. Think about which one you think best describes our relationship with poetry. • As a reminder, those four poems are: • "Introduction to Poetry" p. 686 • "Poetry" p. 469 • "ArsPoetica" p. 709 • "Selecting a Reader" p. 707

    8. In Class Writing #4 • Which of the four poems we read last class about poetry best defines poetry and your relationship to it? Why? • We read: • "Introduction to Poetry" on p. 686 • "Poetry" on p. 469 • "ArsPoetica" on p. 709 • "Selecting a Reader“ on p. 707