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Beliefs and Assumptions. March 2012 MTL meeting Laura Maly Bernard Rahming Cynthia cuellar Rodriguez. Strategies and practical techniques for classroom formative assessment. Engineering effective discussions, activities, and classroom tasks that elicit evidence of learning

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beliefs and assumptions

Beliefs and Assumptions

March 2012 MTL meeting

Laura Maly

Bernard Rahming

Cynthia cuellar Rodriguez

strategies and practical techniques for classroom formative assessment
Strategies and practical techniques for classroom formative assessment

Engineering effective discussions, activities, and classroom tasks that elicit evidence of learning

  • Key idea: questioning should
    • cause thinking
    • provide data that informs teaching
  • Improving teacher questioning
    • generating questions with colleagues
    • low-order vs. high-order not closed vs. open
    • appropriate wait-time
  • tasks that elicit evidence of learning
  • Getting away from (I-R-E)
    • basketball rather than serial table-tennis
    • ‘No hands up’ (except to ask a question)
    • ‘Hot Seat’ questioning
  • All-student response systems
    • ABCD cards, “show-me” boards, exit passes

Dylan William; Sustaining formative assessment with teacher learning communities, March 2012

learning intention success criteria
Learning IntentionSuccess Criteria
  • Learning Intention
    • We are learning to develop an understanding of how beliefs and assumptions impact our work with schools, teams and individuals.
  • Success Criteria
    • We will know we are successful when we develop strategies to address beliefs and assumptions that hinder the implementation of the Instructional Design of the CMSP.
what is a belief an assumption
What is a belief? An assumption?

Turn and Talk

  • Belief:
    • Acceptance of truth of something; trust; something that somebody believes in; opinion
    • Acceptance by the mind that something is true or real, often underpinned by an emotional or spiritual sense of certainty
  • Assumption:
    • Something taken for granted
    • Something that is believed to be true without proof

Encarta Dictionary

comfort groups
Comfort Groups
  • What textbook series are you most comfortable with?
  • Individual
    • Illustrate how you feel about this program
  • Whip around your group.
    • Why did you choose this group?
    • Share your illustration
  • As a group
    • Create a collage that includes all illustrations
  • Discuss the Comfort Group questions
comfort groups debrief
Comfort Groups Debrief
  • What assumptions might teachers who teach using these materials have about the teaching and learning of mathematics?
  • How does the lesson format align with or contradict the CMSP Instructional Design?
  • Do you have any evidence to demonstrate that teachers’ beliefs about their use of a textbook are related to student demographics?
  • Highlight 3 important elements of your group’s conversation to share with others
why do people resist change
Why do People Resist Change?
  • As a table group
    • Brainstorm a list of common causes of resistance in schools

Overcoming Resistance

what s our goal
What’s Our Goal?
  • Goal: students meeting and exceeding standards
    • We believe that inquiry – based learning will help us meet this goal
  • Hand Up; Stand Up; Pair Up
    • Discuss what inquiry-based learning means to you
shift in how we instruct
Shift in How We Instruct

FROM

TO

Launch

  • Teacher instructs students in a concept or skill
  • Teacher solves example problems with the class
  • Students practice on their own while the teacher assists individual students
  • Teacher introduces problem
  • Students struggle with the problem
  • Various students present ideas or solutions to the class
  • The class discusses the various solution methods
  • Teacher summarizes the class’ conclusion
  • Students practice similar problems
  • Students practice their new understanding in a new context

Explore

Summarize

Apply

Accessible Mathematics: 10 Instructional Shifts That Raise Student Achievement, S. Leinwand, 2009

down and dirty
Down and Dirty
  • In Comfort Groups:
    • Review the Guide for Planning with __(textbook series)__
      • Find those sections in your book
      • Provide feedback on the Guide
      • 1 copy with notes submitted per group
    • Whole groups share out
      • Highlights discussed about the Guide
      • Successes and Challenges of planning using the Guide
  • Homework: Mixed groups
    • Plan an upcoming lesson using the Guide’s suggestions
learning intention success criteria1
Learning IntentionSuccess Criteria
  • Learning Intention
    • We are learning to develop an understanding of how beliefs and assumptions impact our work with schools, teams and individuals
  • Success Criteria
    • We will know we are successful when we develop strategies to address beliefs and assumptions that hinder the implementation of the Instructional Design of the CMSP
now what
Now What?
  • How do we address teacher’s beliefs and assumptions about the Instructional Design and their primary textbook?
    • Do you think the texts that teachers are using impact how they apply the Instructional Design?
    • Identify 3 strategies you will use when working with teachers to address resistance to the instructional design.
looking at the wrong knowledge
Looking at the wrong knowledge
  • The most powerful teacher knowledge is not explicit:
    • That’s why telling teachers what to do doesn’t work.
    • What we know is more than we can say.
    • And that is why most professional development has been relatively ineffective.
  • Improving practice involves changing habits, not adding knowledge:
    • That’s why it’s hard:
      • And the hardest bit is not getting new ideas into people’s heads.
      • It’s getting the old ones out.
    • That’s why it takes time.
  • But it doesn’t happen naturally:
    • If it did, the most experienced teachers would be the most productive, and that’s not true (Hanushek & Rivkin, 2006).
transfer to classroom practice
Transfer to Classroom Practice

Percent of Participants

Attaining Transfer

Theory/Information Only 5%

Demonstration 10%

Practice 20%

Peer Coaching 90%

Joyce & Showers, 2001

reflection
Reflection
  • Identify 3 strategies you will use when working with teachers to address resistance to the instructional design.
learning intention success criteria2
Learning IntentionSuccess Criteria
  • Learning Intention
    • We are learning to develop an understanding of how beliefs and assumptions impact our work with schools, teams and individuals
  • Success Criteria
    • We will know we are successful when we develop strategies to address beliefs and assumptions that hinder the implementation of the Instructional Design of the CMSP
change
Change
  • You can’t change the world – you can only change yourself.
    • Although we can only change ourselves, making a change creates a ripple effect, like throwing a stone into a pond. When we change our behavior, the effects of that change may reach farther than we anticipate. We don’t always see the big picture and realize the impact we have on others. By working for change within ourselves, we often affect others in a way we couldn‘t do otherwise.

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