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We can read: a reading workshop for parents

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  1. We can read:a reading workshop for parents

  2. FIVE ESSENTIAL SKILLS NEEDED FOR READING • Phonological and Phonemic Awareness • Phonics • Fluency • Vocabulary • Comprehension

  3. 1. PHONOLOGICAL AND PHONEMIC AWARENESS • The awareness of how sounds in words work and the ability to use them • Children need to understand that words are made up of speech sounds, or phonemes

  4. 6.PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS • The ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words • Helps children sound out words as they begin to read

  5. The 3 Components of Phonological Awareness • Beginning sounds /m/ /r/ /w/ • Rhyming words • Blending and Segmenting

  6. What the problem looks like • A kid's perspective: What this feels like to me • Children will usually express their frustration and difficulties in a general way, with statements like "I hate reading!" or "This is stupid!". But if they could, this is how kids might describe how difficulties with phonological or phonemic awareness affect their reading: • I don't know any words that rhyme with cat. • What do you mean when you say, "What sounds are in the word brush?" • I'm not sure how many syllables are in my name. • I don't know what sounds are the same in bit and hit.

  7. What the problem looks like • A parent's perspective: What I see at home • Here are some clues for parents that a child may have problems with phonological or phonemic awareness: • She has difficulty thinking of rhyming words for a simple word like cat (such as rat or bat). • She doesn't show interest in language play, word games, or rhyming.

  8. How to help • With the help of parents and teachers, kids can learn strategies to cope with phonological and/or phonemic awareness problems that affect his or her reading. Below are some tips and specific things to do

  9. How to help • What kids can do to help themselves • Be willing to play word and sounds games with parents or teachers. • Be patient with learning new information related to words and sounds. Giving the ears a workout is difficult! • Practice hearing the individual sounds in words. It may help to use a plastic chip as a counter for each sound you hear in a word. • Be willing to practice writing. This will give you a chance to match sounds with letters.

  10. How to help • What parents can do to help at home • Check with your child's teacher or principal to make sure the school's reading program teaches phonological, phonemic awareness, and phonics skills. • If your child is past the ages at which phonemic awareness and phonological skills are taught class-wide (usually kindergarten to first or second grade), make sure he or she is receiving one-on-one or small group instruction in these skills. • Do activities to help your child build sound skills (make sure they are short and fun; avoid allowing your child to get frustrated): • Help your child think of a number of words that start with the /m/ or /ch/ sound, or other beginning sounds. • Make up silly sentences with words that begin with the same sound, such as "Nobody was nice to Nancy's neighbor". • Play simple rhyming or blending games with your child, such as taking turns coming up with words that rhyme (go – no) or blending simple words (/d/, /o/, /g/ = dog). • Read books with rhymes. Teach your child rhymes, short poems, and songs. • Practice the alphabet by pointing out letters wherever you see them and by reading alphabet books. • Consider using computer software that focuses on developing phonological and phonemic awareness skills. Many of these programs use colorful graphics and animation that keep young children engaged and motivated.

  11. How to help • Combine or blend the separate sounds in a word to say the word ie: m/,/a/,/p/ - map • Breaking or segmenting a word into separate sounds ie: up – u/,/p/ • Read books with rhymes • Games such as how many words can you think of that rhyme with ‘bat’

  12. 2. PHONICS • The ability to understand the relationship between written letters and sounds • Teaches children to use these relationships to read and write words

  13. What the problem looks like • A kid's perspective: What this feels like to me • Children will usually express their frustration and difficulties in a general way, with statements like "I hate reading!" or "This is stupid!". But if they could, this is how kids might describe how word decoding and phonics difficulties affect their reading: • I just seem to get stuck when I try to read a lot of the words in this chapter. • Figuring out the words takes so much of my energy, I can't even think about what it means. • I don't know how to sound out these words. • I know my letters and sounds, but I just can't read words on a page.

  14. What the problem looks like • A parent's perspective: What I see at home • Here are some clues for parents that a child may have problems with word decoding and phonics: • She often gets stuck on words when reading. I end up telling her many of the words. • His reading is very slow because he spends so much time figuring out words. • She's not able to understand much about what she's read because she's so busy trying to sound out the words. • It's as if he doesn't know how to put the information together to read words. • Saying "sound it out" to her just seems to make her more frustrated. • He guesses at words based on the first letter or two; it's as if he doesn't pay close attention to the print.

  15. How to help • With the help of parents and teachers, kids can learn strategies to overcome word decoding and phonics problems that affect their reading. Below are some tips and specific things to do.

  16. How to help • What kids can do to help themselves • Play with magnetic letters. See how quickly you can put them in alphabetical order while singing the alphabet song. • Look at written materials around your house and at road signs to see if you can spot familiar words and letter patterns. • Write notes, e-mails, and letters to your friends and family. Represent each sound you hear as you write. • When you're trying to sound out a word, pay close attention to the print. Try to look at all the letters in the word, not just the first one or two.

  17. How to help • What parents can do to help at home • For a younger reader, help your child learn the letters and sounds of the alphabet. Occasionally point to letters and ask your child to name them. • Help your child make connections between what he or she might see on a sign or in the newspaper and the letter and sound work he or she is doing in school. • Encourage your child to write and spell notes, e-mails, and letters using what he knows about sounds and letters. • Talk with your child about the "irregular" words that she'll often see in what she's reading. These are the words that don't follow the usual letter-sound rules. These words include said, are, and was. Students must learn to recognize them "at sight." • Consider using computer software that focuses on developing phonics and emergent literacy skills. Some software programs are designed to support children in their writing efforts. For example, some programs encourage kids to construct sentences and then cartoon characters will act out the completed sentence. Other software programs provide practice with long and short vowel sounds and creating compound words.

  18. 3. FLUENCY • Is the ability to read text accurately and quickly without sounding out the words • Fluent readers do not have to concentrate on decoding the words, they can focus on what the text means

  19. front

  20. What the problem looks like • A kid's perspective: What this feels like to me • Children will usually express their frustration and difficulties in a general way, with statements like "I hate reading!" or "This is stupid!". But if they could, this is how kids might describe how fluency difficulties in particular affect their reading: • I just seem to get stuck when I try to read a lot of the words in this chapter. • It takes me so long to read something. • Reading through this book takes so much of my energy, I can't even think about what it means.

  21. What the problem looks like • A parent's perspective: What I see at home • Here are some clues for parents that a child may have problems with fluency: • He knows how to read words but seems to take a long time to read a short book or passage silently. • She reads a book with no expression. • He stumbles a lot and loses his place when reading something aloud. • She reads aloud very slowly. • She moves her mouth when reading silently (subvocalizing).

  22. How to help • With the help of parents and teachers, kids can learn strategies to cope with fluency issues that affect his or her reading. Below are some tips and specific things to do.

  23. How to help • What kids can do to help themselves • Track the words with your finger as a parent or teacher reads a passage aloud. Then you read it. • Have a parent or teacher read aloud to you. Then, match your voice to theirs. • Read your favorite books and poems over and over again. Practice getting smoother and reading with expression.

  24. How to help • What parents can do to help at home • Support and encourage your child. Realize that he or she is likely frustrated by reading. • Check with your child's teachers to find out their assessment of your child's word decoding skills. • If your child can decode words well, help him or her build speed and accuracy by: • Reading aloud and having your child match his voice to yours • Having your child practice reading the same list of words, phrase, or short passages several times • Reminding your child to pause between sentences and phrases • Read aloud to your child to provide an example of how fluent reading sounds. • Give your child books with predictable vocabulary and clear rhythmic patterns so the child can "hear" the sound of fluent reading as he or she reads the book aloud. • Use books on tapes; have the child follow along in the print copy.

  25. 4. VOCABULARY • The knowledge of many words to make it easier to understand what has been read

  26. What the problem looks like • A kid's perspective: What this feels like to me • Children will usually express their frustration and difficulties in a general way, with statements like "I hate reading!" or "This is stupid!". But if they could, this is how kids might describe how their vocabulary difficulties affect their reading: • I heard my friend tell what happened in the movie but I didn't really understand what he said about it. • I feel like I just use the same words over and over again in my writing. • I don't like to read on my own because I don't understand lots of the words in the book.

  27. What the problem looks like • A parent's perspective: What I see at home • Here are some clues for parents that a child may have difficulties as a result of his or her vocabulary: • She's unable to tell about her day in a way that makes sense. • She misuses common words. • He doesn't link words from a book to similar words from another book or from real life. • He's often not able to find the right word to describe something.

  28. How to help • With the help of parents and teachers, kids can overcome vocabulary limitations that affect their reading. Below are some tips and specific things to do.

  29. How to help • What kids can do to help themselves • Find books and magazines to read on your own. The more you read, the more new words you'll see, and the more you'll learn about the words. • Look ahead in textbooks to learn new vocabulary and concepts before your teacher goes over the section in class. • Keep a list of key vocabulary and transition words. • Practice telling stories using the words first, then, and finally.

  30. How to help • What parents can do to help at home • Engage your child in conversations every day. If possible, include new and interesting words in your conversation. • Read to your child each day. When the book contains a new or interesting word, pause and define the word for your child. After you're done reading, engage your child in a conversation about the book. • Help build word knowledge by classifying and grouping objects or pictures while naming them. • Help build your child's understanding of language by playing verbal games and telling jokes and stories. • Encourage your child to read on his own. The more children read, the more words they encounter and learn. • Find books, magazines, and websites on subjects your child is interested in. • Use a dictionary, look up words together, wonder out loud….

  31. 5. COMPREHENSION • The ability of a child to understand what he/she has just read

  32. What the problem looks like • A kid's perspective: What this feels like to me • Children will usually express their frustration and difficulties in a general way, with statements like "I hate reading!" or "This is stupid!". But if they could, this is how kids might describe how comprehension difficulties in particular affect their reading: • It takes me so long to read something. It's hard to follow along with everything going on. • I didn't really get what that book was about. • Why did that character do that? I just don't get it! • I'm not sure what the most important parts of the book were. • I couldn't really create an image in my head of what was going on.

  33. What the problem looks like • A parent's perspective: What I see at home • Here are some clues for parents that a child may have problems with comprehension: • She's not able to summarize a passage or a book. • He might be able to tell you what happened in a story, but can't explain why events went the way they did. • She can't explain what a character's thoughts or feelings might have been. • He doesn't link events in a book to similar events from another book or from real life.

  34. How to help • With the help of parents and teachers, kids can learn strategies to cope with comprehension problems that affect his or her reading. Below are some tips and specific things to do.

  35. How to help • What kids can do to help themselves • Use outlines, maps, and notes when you read. • Make flash cards of key terms you might want to remember. • Read stories or passages in short sections and make sure you know what happened before you continue reading. • Ask yourself, "Does this make sense?" If it doesn't, reread the part that didn't make sense. • Read with a buddy. Stop every page or so and take turns summarizing what you've read. • Ask a parent or teacher to preview a book with you before you read it on your own. • As you read, try to form mental pictures or images that match the story.

  36. How to help • What parents can do to help at home • Hold a conversation and discuss what your child has read. Ask your child probing questions about the book and connect the events to his or her own life. For example, say "I wonder why that girl did that?" or "How do you think he felt? Why?" and "So, what lesson can we learn here?". • Help your child make connections between what he or she reads and similar experiences he has felt, saw in a movie, or read in another book. • Help your child monitor his or her understanding. Teach her to continually ask herself whether she understands what she's reading. • Help your child go back to the text to support his or her answers. • Discuss the meanings of unknown words, both those he reads and those he hears. • Read material in short sections, making sure your child understands each step of the way. • Discuss what your child has learned from reading informational text such as a science or social studies book. • Choosing books at your child’s level.

  37. Dialogic Reading • Ask “what” questions • Follow answers with questions • Repeat what your child says • Help your child as needed • Praise and encouragement is important • Follow your child’s interests

  38. Difficulties with Reading • What mystifies many parents is where and why the reading process breaks down. Although, problems may occur in any area, decoding, comprehension, or retention, the root of most reading problems, in the view of many experts, is decoding. Reading Facts • Roughly 85% of children diagnosed with learning difficulties have a primary problem with reading and related language skills. • Reading difficulties are neurodevelopmental in nature. • Neurodevelopmental problems don't go away, but they do not mean that a student (or an adult) cannot learn or progress in school and life. • Most children with reading difficulties can be taught reading and strategies for success in school. • When children's reading problems are identified early, they are more likely to learn strategies that will raise their reading to grade level.

  39. Decoding Difficulties • Decoding is the process by which a word is broken into individual phonemes and recognized based on those phonemes. For instance, proficient decoders separate the sounds "buh," "aah," and "guh" in the word "bag." Someone who has difficulty decoding, and thus difficulty reading easily, may not hear and differentiate these phonemes. "Buh," "aah," and "guh" might be meaningless to them in relation to the word "bag" on the page. • Experts have no one explanation for this phenomenon. In some cases, it may reflect that some people simply require more time to separate sounds -- time that isn't there. Signs of decoding difficulty: • trouble sounding out words and recognizing words out of context • confusion between letters and the sounds they represent • slow oral reading rate (reading word-by-word) • reading without expression • ignoring punctuation while reading •      Try it yourself. Experience a decoding difficulty

  40. Phonological Processing • Phonological processing refers specifically to the processing of speech sounds (phonemes). Many poor readers have a specific weakness in phonological processing even through their other processing skills (auditory and language processing) are strong. This is often the case for students with reading disabilities. Readers with phonological processing difficulties usually have problems decoding words.

  41. Comprehension Difficulties • Comprehension relies on mastery of decoding; children who struggle to decode find it difficult to understand and remember what has been read. Because their efforts to grasp individual words are so exhausting, they have no resources left for understanding. Signs of comprehension difficulty: • confusion about the meaning of words and sentences • inability to connect ideas in a passage • omission of, or glossing over detail • difficulty distinguishing significant information from minor details • lack of concentration during reading

  42. Retention Difficulties • Retention requires both decoding and comprehending what is written. This task relies on high level cognitive skills, including memory and the ability to group and retrieve related ideas. As students progress through grade levels, they are expected to retain more and more of what they read. From third grade on, reading to learn is central to classroom work. By high school it is an essential task. Signs of retention difficulty: • trouble remembering or summarizing what is read • difficulty connecting what is read to prior knowledge • difficulty applying content of a text to personal experiences • http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/misunderstoodminds/readingdiffs.html

  43. Memory • In order to read, children must be able to place information into their memories and retrieve it when needed. What helps children understand vocabulary and comprehend what they read is being able to efficiently move back and forth between what they see in print and what is stored in their memories. • There are different types of memory, including short-term memory, working memory, and long-term memory.

  44. What next? • Has this been helpful? • How could the library support you as parents? • Is there other information you would like to have?