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Reading Response Journals. Mrs. Terry Language Arts. Reading Texts and Materials. 7 th Grade . 8 th Grade. “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin “All the Years of Her Life” by Morley Callaghan Poetry collection websites Various picture books Song lyrics The Twilight Zone on Hulu.com.

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Reading Response Journals


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  1. Reading Response Journals Mrs. Terry Language Arts

  2. Reading Texts and Materials 7th Grade 8th Grade “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin “All the Years of Her Life” by Morley Callaghan Poetry collection websites Various picture books Song lyrics The Twilight Zone on Hulu.com • “Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto • Poetry collection websites • Various picture books • Song lyrics • The Twilight Zone on Hulu.com

  3. Lesson 1 Objective • By the end of the lesson, each student will be able to connect information and events in the story to their own experiences in a response journal entry that will be evaluated using a standards-based rubric. • AZ State Standard: Reading 1.6.5 and 1.6.7

  4. Lesson 1 Materials 7th Grade 8th Grade “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin Dialectic Journal and Standards-Based Rubric handouts Composition Books • “Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto • Reading Response Journal and Standards-Based rubric handouts • Composition Books

  5. 7th Grade, Lesson 1 OpenerRespond to one of the following prompts in your composition book: • Option 1: Think back to your first day of seventh grade. How did you feel? What did you think? What happened? How have you changed since then? • Option 2: Have you ever done anything to impress a boy or a girl you liked? What did you do? Did it work? • Option 3: Write about a time you felt embarrassed. What happened and how did you get over it?

  6. 8th Grade Lesson 1 OpenerRespond to the following prompt in your composition book: • Have you ever felt like your parents, teachers, society, etc. limit your choices? Do you feel like you should be given more freedom and respect? Or do you feel like you are treated appropriately for your age and maturity level? Should our society change the way we perceive and treat teenagers? Why or why not? Can you think of any specific examples from your personal experience to support your ideas?

  7. Lesson 1 Instructional Content • Discuss opening activity • Read the story • During reading: point out areas that students may relate to/connect with. • Ask questions to help students make connections. • Post reading: model journaling process (examples on the following slides)

  8. 7th Grade Journal Example 1.6.5 Text Response I chose this passage because Victor’s homeroom experience reminds me of the first day of school this year. Even though Victor is describing it from a student’s perspective, I can relate to the chaos and the excitement of the first day of school, even as a teacher. My students often wiggle and squirm in their seats and ignore me when I’m talking. I don’t take it personally; I know that they are just nervous and excited. “In homeroom, roll was taken, emergency cards were passed out, and they were given a bulletin to take home to their parents. The principal, Mr. Belton, spoke over the crackling loudspeaker, welcoming the students to a new year, new experiences, and new friendships. The students squirmed in their chairs and ignored him” (Soto, 12). Standard 1.6.5

  9. 8th Grade Journal Example 1.6.5 Text Response I connect to this story because as a teenager, I too often feel restricted by my parents and society. Mrs. Mallard is repressed by her husband and the expectations for women at this time. She is forced to stay at home to fulfill her domestic duties. She is essentially living the way someone else wants her to live. Even though I know that it is usually in my best interest, I sometimes feel repressed by the expectations and limits imposed on me. “There would be no one to live for during those coming years; she would live for herself. There would be no powerful will bending hers…” (Chopin, 2) Standard 1.6.5

  10. Lesson 2 Objective • By the end of the lesson, each student will be able to describe a character from the story in their reading response journals based on the thoughts, words and actions of the character, the narrator’s description of the character, and the thoughts, words and actions of other characters in the story. Responses will be evaluated using a standards-based rubric. • AZ State Standard: Reading 2.1.3 and 1.6.7

  11. Lesson 2 Materials 7th Grade 8th Grade “All the Years of Her Life” by Morley Callaghan Dialectic Journal and Standards-Based Rubric handouts Composition Books • “Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto • Reading Response Journal and Standards-Based rubric handouts • Composition Books

  12. Lesson 2 Opener • Answer the following question in your composition book: • After reading the story, what are 10 things you can tell me about the protagonist? Go beyond physical description and tell me about the character’s personality, thoughts, feelings, etc.

  13. Opening Activity • Get out your character bubble map for Victor • Choose three of your descriptive adjectives • Find a quote from the story to support each of the three adjectives that you chose. • Write them next to or below your bubble map. • If you know the difference, label each quote either “direct” or “indirect” characterization.

  14. Lesson 2 Instructional Content • Discuss opener, asking students to find evidence from the story to support their claims about the character. • Go over characterization notes in the slides that follow. • Discuss whether the textual evidence that they found to support their claims was direct or indirect. • Discuss whether they believe the character is dynamic or static. • Model the journaling process.

  15. Lesson 2 Characterization • Characterization is the process by which the writer reveals the personality of a character. Characterization is revealed through direct characterization and indirect characterization.

  16. Types of Characterization Direct Characterization tells the audience what the personality of the character is. Example: “The patient boy and quiet girl were both well mannered and did not disobey their mother.” Explanation: The author is directly telling the audience the personality of these two children. The boy is “patient” and the girl is “quiet.” Indirect Characterization shows things that reveal the personality of a character in the following ways: • The things they say • The things they do • Through their thoughts • How they look • The way other characters react to them

  17. Types of Characters Characters experience varying amounts of change over the course of a story. • Static characters that do not experience basic character changes during the course of the story. • Dynamic characters that experience changes throughout the plot of a story. Although the change may be sudden, it is expected based on the story’s events. A story’s characters fall within a range—from very static characters that experience no change to very dynamic characters that undergo one or more major changes.

  18. 7th Grade Journal Example 2.1.3 Text Response This is an example of indirect char. The first thing this passage tells us about Victor is that he obviously doesn’t know French. It also shows that he gets nervous very easily, especially around Teresa, the girl he has a crush on. In this scene, Victor is trying to impress Teresa by pretending to be something he’s not. This shows us that he is willing to risk embarrassment to get her attention. This behavior seems pretty normal for a teenaged boy with his first crush. “Great rosebushes of red bloomed on Victor’s cheeks. A river of nervous sweat ran down his palms. He felt awful. Teresa sat a few desks away, no doubt thinking he was a fool. Without looking at Mr. Bueller, Victor mumbled, “Frenchie oh wewe gee in September” (Soto, 17) Standard 2.1.3

  19. 8th Grade Journal Example 2.1.3 Text Response This passage shows that Mrs. Higgins has been aged by caring for her children and dealing with their problems. When she leans back in her chair and sighs, she is thinking about all of the times that she has had to help her children and be strong for them. Even though she acted so calm and confident in the drug store, when she is alone here and her hand trembles, it shows that she is actually very worried and anxious about her son’s future. “When she reached out and lifted the kettle to pour hot water in her cup, her hand trembled and the water splashed on the stove. Leaning back in the chair, she sighed and lifted the cup to her lips” (Callaghan, 3). Standard 2.1.3

  20. Lesson 3 Objective • By the end of the lesson, each student will be able to identify the point of view of the story and analyze this perspective in a reading response journal entry that will be evaluated using a standards-based rubric. • AZ State Standard: Reading 2.1.4 and 1.6.7

  21. Types of Point of View Objective Point of ViewWith the objective point of view, the writer tells what happens without stating more than can be inferred from the story's action and dialogue. The narrator never discloses anything about what the characters think or feel, remaining a detached observer. Third Person Point of ViewHere the narrator does not participate in the action of the story as one of the characters, but lets us know exactly how the characters feel. We learn about the characters through this outside voice. First Person Point of ViewIn the first person point of view, the narrator does participate in the action of the story. When reading stories in the first person, we need to realize that what the narrator is recounting might not be the objective truth. We should question the trustworthiness of the accounting. Omniscient and Limited Omniscient Points of ViewA narrator who knows everything about all the characters is all knowing, or omniscient. A narrator whose knowledge is limited to one character, either major or minor, has a limited omniscient point of view. As you read a piece of fiction think about these things: How does the point of view affect your responses to the characters? How is your response influenced by how much the narrator knows and how objective he or she is? First person narrators are not always trustworthy. It is up to you to determine what is the truth and what is not.

  22. 8th Grade Journal Example 2.1.4 Text Response This passage demonstrates the third-person limited point of view that is used in the story. The story is told by an outside narrator who knows only the thoughts and feelings of Alfred. We only learn about Sam Carr and Mrs. Higgins through their actions (as shown here in the text), the things they say, and the thoughts that Alfred has about them. They are developed indirectly, while Alfred’s character is developed both indirectly and directly (shown here). This method is effective because it allows us to see and understand Alfred’s epiphany about his mother and his childhood. “While Sam Carr smiled and stroked the side of his face very delicately with the tips of his fingers, Alfred began to feel that familiar terror growing in him that had been in him every time he had got into such trouble” (Callaghan, 1). Standard 2.1.4

  23. 7th Grade Journal Example 2.1.4 Text Response This passage demonstrates the third-person omniscient point of view of the story. The narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of Victor, who is worried that Mr. Bueller will say something in front of Teresa about his terrible attempt at pretending to know French. We also know the feelings of Mr. Bueller, who is sympathetic to what Victor is going through. This point of view is effective because even though the focus of the story is Victor, this scene also tells us a lot about Mr. Bueller. The reader, and Victor discover that he is a pretty good guy who understands what his students are going through. So while 7th grade can seem so scary, Victor learns that it isn’t all bad. “Oh please, don’t say anything, Victor pleaded with his eyes. I’ll wash your car, mow your lawn, walk your dog--anything! I'll be Your best student, and I’ll clean your erasers after school. Mr. Bueller shuffled through the papers on his desk, He smiled and hummed as he sat down to work. He remembered his college years when he dated a girlfriend in borrowed cars. She thought he was rich because each time he picked her up he had a different car. It was fun until he had spent all his money on her and had to write home to his parents because he was broke” (Soto, 7). Standard 2.1.4

  24. Lesson 4 Objective • By the end of the lesson, each student will be able to identify and explain various examples of figurative language in their reading response journals. Responses will be evaluated using a standards-based rubric. • AZ State Standard: Reading 1.4.4

  25. Figurative Language Scavenger Hunt Go to the following website:  http://www.dowlingcentral.com/MrsD/area/literature/LitTerms.htmlRead and review the definitions and examples for the following terms.  Then take the quiz at the bottom of each page. alliteration, allusion, assonance, hyperbole, imageryirony, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personificationsimile

  26. Scavenger Hunt, continued… Peruse poetry websites and read several poems. As you read the poems, look for examples of the types of figurative language listed in the previous slide.  You will need to find at least five examples.  Write these examples in your composition book.List the five examples that you have found in response-journal format. See the example on the following slide. Please remember that in your journals, you must find examples from your independent reading book.

  27. Journal Example 1.4.4 Text Response This is a metaphor, comparing a dream that has been forgotten to a bird with a broken wing. Just as the bird with the broken wing cannot fly, a person without a dream to believe in and work toward cannot rise above life’s challenges. “Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly.” (From “Dreams” by Langston Hughes)

  28. Homework: • Using the examples you have been shown, Write your own journal entries for the book that you are reading independently. • Journal Due Dates: Hours 3,5,6- September 27 Hours 2,4- October 8 You are welcome to turn in your journals early so that you have time to revise before the end of the quarter.

  29. Lesson 4 Check for Understanding • Please get out your figurative language examples from the computer lab. Choose one example to share with the class. • Bonus (candy), share one of the figurative language examples that you wrote in response to a work of art. Be prepared to tell us the name of the painting and describe the picture you chose.

  30. Lesson 5 Opener • Read the picture book that is on your table as a group. As you read, think about conflict. • When you are finished, discuss the conflicts in the story with your group. • Select someone to write down the title of the book and list all of the conflicts that you found. This can be done in your comp. book. • In addition, find passages from the text that demonstrate this conflict. • Be prepared to share.

  31. Lesson 5 Instructional ContentTypes of Conflict Internal External A struggle between a character and an outside force is an external conflict. Characters may face several types of outside forces. The outside force may be another character. It may be the character and the community. The outside force may also be forces of nature. For example, a story might be the main character struggling against the arctic cold. Person vs. Person Person vs. Nature Person vs. Society Person vs. _______ • A struggle that takes place in a character's mind is called internal conflict. For example, a character may have to decide between right and wrong or between two solutions to a problem. Sometimes, a character must deal with his or her own mixed feelings or emotions. • Person vs. Self

  32. Text for Plot “He smiled back and said, “Yeah, that’s me.” His brown face blushed. Why hadn’t he said “Hi, Teresa,” or “How was your summer?” or something nice?” (Soto 13).

  33. Response for Plot This passage demonstrates an internal conflict. Victor reacts to Teresa’s friendly salutation with an awkward and nervous response. He immediately blushes with embarrassment and gets angry with himself for saying something so lame. This incident, and many other embarrassing moments in the story contribute to Victor’s lack of confidence and negative perception of 7th grade. This conflict is resolved at the end of the story when Teresa asks him to help her with her French. Victor realizes that even though he felt humiliated and frustrated, Teresa either hadn’t noticed, cared, or perhaps thought it was flattering. Regardless, she seems to like Victor for who he is. Through Victor’s experiences, we learn that it is human nature to sometimes do and say things that are awkward or embarrassing, but it is how we respond to these situations that can help us develop self-confidence and the ability to laugh at ourselves.

  34. Journal Example 2.1.1 Text Response This passage demonstrates an internal conflict (person vs. self)as Ira tries to decide whether or not he will be able to survive his first sleep over without his teddy bear. Ira eventually decides to go without his bear, but after being scared and finding out that his friend also has a bear, he goes home to get him. Ira learns that he is not alone and that he shouldn’t worry so much about what other people think. • “But now she really had me thinking about it. I began to wonder: suppose I won’t like sleeping without my teddy bear. Suppose I just hate sleeping without my teddy bear. Should I take him?” (from “Ira Sleeps Over” by Bernard Waber).

  35. Journal Example 2.1.1 Text Response This passage demonstrates the conflict person vs. society because Eddie and Al don’t want to be birds, and to be a part of the paradise society, they have to be birds. They eventually decide that they would rather be themselves than change who they are to fit into society. Even if it means losing paradise. • “We’ve got to get out of here, he croaked… Take us back, take us back! Eddie quacked. I don’t want to be a bird! I’d rather mop floors!” (from “Hey, Al” by Arthur Yorkins and Richard Egielski).

  36. Journal Example 2.1.1 Text Example This passage is an example of a person vs. society conflict. Henry’s neighbors want him to keep his yard as neat and clean as theirs, but Henry doesn’t like his yard that way. To try to solve his problem, Henry moves away, but he misses his home and his neighbors, so he decides to compromise and conform to his neighbors’ expectations. • “Now Henry had had his fill, that night he grumbled never will, live like the rest of them neat and the same, I am sorry I came” (from “Old Henry” by Joan W. Blos).

  37. Lesson 6 Objective • By the end of the lesson, each student will be able to draw conclusions and make inferences in their reading response journals that will help them interpret text. Responses will be evaluated using a standards-based rubric. • AZ State Standard: Reading 1.6.7

  38. Lesson 6 Opener • Answer the following questions in your composition book, be ready to discuss: 1. What does it mean toinfer? 2. What is an inference? 3. What is foreshadowing? 4. What is suspense? 5. How does a writer create suspense?

  39. Lesson 6 Instructional Content 1. To infer (verb) is to draw a conclusion or make a logical judgment on the basis of textual evidence. 2. an inference(noun) is that conclusion or judgment. 3. Foreshadowing is when an author provides clues for the reader to help them predict (or infer) what might occur later on in the story. 4. Suspense is a feeling of uncertainty and anxiety about the outcome of events in a story. 5. Writers create suspense in a number of ways: through their description of setting, foreshadowing, their choice of narrator (POV), their characterization, and the way they develop the plot of the story.

  40. Lesson 6 Guided Practice • Students will view “The Waxworks,” an episode in the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. • The teacher will pause the show at various times in the movie to ask students the questions on the following slides. • After the show, we will discuss the questions and complete a sample reading-response journal entry for standard 1.6.7.

  41. Please answer in your comp. book: 1. Describe the setting of this scene in one or two complete sentences. 2. How does this setting make you feel? In other words, how does the setting affect the mood of the story? 3. List one example of foreshadowing that you have seen so far in the show. 4. What do you inferwill happen next?

  42. “Eye of the Beholder” Strategies Text Response This quote foreshadows Janet’s future life of isolation and seclusion from the mainstream society. It also indicates that her future, just like her outlook from within her bandages, is very dark and bleak. The author also uses the bandages metaphorically to suggest that this society has limited their perception of beauty to conform to unattainable standards. “Miss Janet Tyler, who lives in a very private world of darkness, a universe whose dimensions are the size, thickness, length of a swath of bandages that cover her face” (Twilight Zone).

  43. “Eye of the Beholder” Theme Text Response See next slide • Janet Tyler: Mr. Smith? Walter Smith: Yes? Janet Tyler: Why do we have to look like this? Walter Smith: I don't know, Miss Tyler, I really don't know. But you know something? it doesn't matter. There's an old saying, a very, very old saying: "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder". When we leave here, when we go to the village, try to think of that, Miss Tyler. Say it over and over to yourself. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder".

  44. Response • This society’s perception of beauty is very different from ours. When Janet asks Walter why they look the way they do, she shows that she has been the victim of intense discrimination based on her appearance. The fact that they must live in a village with “their own kind,” further emphasizes this discrimination. In this story, the author suggests that beauty is a subjective and culturally defined concept, and that there is no absolute definition. When the doctor risks his job, freedom and reputation to question the norms of his society, and acknowledges that Janet’s true beauty comes from within, the author is sending us the message that beauty is only skin deep and it is overrated in our own society.

  45. Journal Example 1.6.7 Text Response I believe that this passage may be an example of foreshadowing. From this passage, I infer that the statue of Bourdette will be a part of the story later. Perhaps his figure will come alive and murder Mr. Houston with a razor. “This is the young man that you had an encounter with a little while ago. His name is Bourdette, or was…this fellow was executed this morning and so obliged us in the nick of time. He was a barber by day, and a murderer by night, and always with a razor. (from Alfred Hitchcock Presents “The Waxwork”).

  46. Journal Example 1.6.7 Text Response This passage is an example of foreshadowing. Bourdette was known to mesmerize his victims with his eyes. Later in the story, the reader is made to believe that Bourdette hypnotized Mr. Houston, but we later learn that he was really just a victim of his own overactive imagination. • “He had extraordinary eyes, a point which was not lost on the jury. According to the evidence at the trial, he was said to hypnotize his victims [eyes move]” (from Alfred Hitchcock Presents “The Waxwork”).

  47. Lesson 7 Objective • By the end of the lesson, each student will be able to analyze the relevance of setting to the mood and tone of the novel they are reading in their reading response journals. Responses will be evaluated using a standards-based rubric. • AZ State Standard: Reading 2.1.5

  48. Lesson 7 Opener • How does setting affect the mood of the story? • Fill in the blanks on the following slides with setting details (time, place, description) that you would expect to find for the given genres (types, styles) of fiction.

  49. Instructions:Fill in the blanks with setting details (time, place, description) that you would expect to find for the given genres (types, styles) of fiction.

  50. Lesson 7 Instructional Content Setting: In fiction, setting includes the time, location, and everything in which a story takes place, and initiates the main backdrop and mood for a story. Consider the setting of the murderers den in “The Waxwork” (look at what you wrote yesterday for question #2). How does this setting make you feel? In other words, how does the setting affect the mood and tone of the story?