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Book Study : Teach Like A Champion Chapter 1. By: Shane Hubbard. What Are High Expectations?. High Expectations are not easily defined. High expectations are very subjective. High expectations are extremely necessary with the introduction of the STAAR exam.

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what are high expectations
What Are High Expectations?

High Expectations are not easily defined.

High expectations are very subjective.

High expectations are extremely necessary with the introduction of the STAAR exam.

We always hear about having high expectations for students, but we are rarely shown what that actually looks like in a classroom setting.

setting high academic expectations
Setting High Academic Expectations

5 Techniques:

  • No Opt Out
  • Right is Right
  • Stretch It
  • Format Matters
  • WithoutApology
no opt out
No Opt Out
  • Maintaining the expectation thatit’s not okay not to try
  • Addresses the studentwhoisusing ‘I don’t know’ as an excuse to beleftalone
  • Addresses the studentwhoishonestlytrying to get the answer but doesn’t know it
the key idea to no opt out
The Key Idea to No Opt Out

A sequencethatbeginswith a studentunable to anwer the question should end with the studentansweringthat question as often as possible.

what it looks like 4 ways to do it
Whatit Looks Like4 Ways to Do It
  • You provide the answer; the studentrepeats the answer.
  • Anotherstudentprovides the answer; the initial studentrepeats the answer.
  • You provide a cue; yourstudent uses it to find the answer.
  • Anotherstudentprovides a cue; the intialstudent uses it to find the answer.
right is right
Right is Right

Set and defend a high standard of correctness in your classroom.

Student’s answers should be 100% right before you tell him/her it is right.

In doing this you set the expectation that the questions you ask and their answers truly matter.

4 ways to do right is right
4 Ways to do Right is Right
  • Hold out for all the way: make sure studentscompletelyanswer the question correctly.
  • Answer the Question: make sure students are answering the actual question youasked.
  • Right Answer, Right Time: make sure students are not jumping ahead of your questions.
  • Use TechnicalVocabulary: make sure students use technicalvocabulary in thieranswers.
stretch it
Stretch It

The sequence of learning does not end with a right answer; reward right answers with follow-up questions that extend knowledge and test for reliability.

how to stretch it
How to “Stretch It”
  • Ask how or why
  • Ask for another way to answer
  • Ask for a better word
  • Ask for evidence
  • Ask students to integrate a related skill
  • Ask students to apply the same skill in a new setting
format matters
Format Matters

Use Format Matters to prepareyourstudents to succeed by requiringcomplete sentences and proficientgrammarevery chance youget.

  • Grammatical Format: correct slang, syntax usage, and grammar
  • Complete Sentence Format: students must use complete sentences
  • Audible Format: make sure everyonecanhear VOICE
without apology
Without Apology
  • Assuming something is boring: if you say it’s boring it will be
  • Blaming it: when you blame someone else the students won’t respond to it
  • Making it “accessible”: find a way to make challenging content seem attainable
chapter 2 planning that ensures academic achievement
Chapter 2Planning That Ensures Academic Achievement

5 Planning Techniques:

  • Begin With the End
  • 4 Ms
  • Post It
  • Shortest Path
  • Double Plan
begin with the end
Begin With The End

Questions:

It means:

Progressing from unit planning to lesson planning

Using a well-framed objective to define the goal of each lesson

Determining how you will assess your effectiveness in reaching your goal

Deciding on your activity

ASK YOURSELF:

Why are you teaching the material you are teaching?

What’s the outcome you desire?

How does this relate to what you will teach tomorrow and to what your students need to have learned to be ready for the next grade?

slide15
4 Ms
  • Manageable: an effective objective shouldbe of a size and scope thatcanbetaught in a single lesson
  • Measurable: an effective objective shouldbewrittensothatyoursuccess in achievingitcanbemeasured, ideally by the end of class period
  • Made First: an effective objective shouldbedesigned to guide the activity, not to justify how a chosenactivitymeets one of several viable purposes
  • Most Important: an effective objective should focus on whatismost important on the path to college and nothingelse
what is wrong with these example objectives
What is Wrong With These Example Objectives?
  • Students will be able to add and subtract fractions with like and unlike denominators.
  • Students will be able to appreciate various forms of poetry, including sonnets and lyric poetry.
  • Students will view scenes from the film version of The Crucible.
  • Students will construct a poster to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
what is wrong with these example objectives1
What is Wrong With These Example Objectives?
  • Students will be able to add and subtract fractions with like and unlike denominators. Not manageable
  • Students will be able to appreciate various forms of poetry, including sonnets and lyric poetry. Not measurable
  • Students will view scenes from the film version of The Crucible. Not made first
  • Students will construct a poster to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Not most important
examples of good objectives
Examples of Good Objectives
  • Recognize and list the literary devices found in Twilight.
  • Identify and describe polygons using the language of Geometry.
  • Understand the basic structure of the atom.
  • Identify the contributions of Kim Kardashian to the nation as a whole.
post it
Post It
  • Write the objective in a visible location every day.
  • Write it in the same place every day so that students can easily recognize it.
  • Point out the objective every day to the students and go over it.
double plan
Double Plan

It’s as important to plan for what students will be doing during each phase of your lesson as it is to plan for you’ll be doing and saying.

Too often teachers forget to plan what students will be doing each step of the way. What will they be doing while you’re reviewing the primary causes of the Civil War?

draw the map
Draw The Map

Questions to ask yourself:

  • When should students interact in school?
  • How should students interact in school?
  • What should the way students sit signal and incentivize about the various kinds of interactions?
  • What kinds of interactions support which kinds of lesson objectives?
  • What other kinds of ways can students be socialized to interact appropriately without necessarily building the classroom around that one idea every day.
chapter 3 structuring and delivering your lessons
Chapter 3:Structuring and DeliveringYourLessons

5 StepProcessof I/We/You: This processhelps to relinquish the responsiblity of learningfrom the teacher to the student.

  • I I do.
  • We I do; you help
  • We You do; I help
  • You You do
  • You You do, and do, and do
the hook
The Hook

A short introductory moment that captures what is interesting and engaging about the material and puts it out front.

  • Story: tell a quick and engaging story that leads directly into the material.
  • Analogy: use an interesting and meaningful analogy to start the lesson
  • Prop: bring in a prop from home and use it to get the student’s attention
  • Media: use a picture or video to capture the student’s attention
  • Status: describe something great: could be great work by a student etc.
  • Challenge: give students a difficult task and let them try to accomplish it
name the steps
Name the Steps
  • Identify the steps: make complex skills transparent to students (no more than 7 steps)
  • Make them sticky: make the names of the steps memorable and something that sticks in the student’s minds (mnemonics can work well)
  • Build the steps: designing the steps in an activity is just as important
  • Use two stairways: have two parallel conversations going about how to get an answer to the current problem and how to answer the problem