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HydroModeler : A tool for modeling within the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System. Jon Goodall, Assistant Professor Tony Castronova, Ph.D. Candidate Mostafa Elag, Ph.D. Candidate Ben Felton, B.S. Student Robert Boykin, B.S. Student Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

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hydromodeler a tool for modeling within the cuahsi hydrologic information system

HydroModeler: A tool for modeling within the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

Jon Goodall, Assistant Professor

Tony Castronova, Ph.D. Candidate

Mostafa Elag, Ph.D. Candidate

Ben Felton, B.S. Student

Robert Boykin, B.S. Student

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

University of South Carolina

CUAHSI Conference on Hydrologic Data and Information Systems

Utah State University - June 22-24, 2011

cuahsi hydrologic information system services oriented architecture
CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System Services-Oriented Architecture

Data Discovery and Integration

HydroCatalog

Search Services

Metadata Services

WaterML, Other OGC Standards

HydroServer

HydroDesktop

Data Analysis and Synthesis

Data Publication

Data Services

ODM

Geo Data

HydroModeler

Information Model and Community Support Infrastructure

research objectives
Research Objectives
  • To investigate the interface between HIS and hydrologic models
  • To create a tool that can be used to support hydrologic science and education
challenges
Challenges
  • “there is no commonly agreed modelling strategy for the rainfall-runoff process but a variety of options and approaches”
  • “it is expected that one hydrologist’s perceptual model will differ from another’s”
  • “I gave up making a list of model when I reached a count of 100 more than 20 years ago”

Rainfall-Runoff Modeling: The Primer, Beven, 2001

our approach
Our Approach
  • Focus on a modeling framework instead of individual models
  • Integrate the modeling framework within HIS
  • Lower the bar to entry for hydrologists to use and extend the modeling framework
hydromodeler gui
HydroModeler GUI

Model Directory

Explorer

Model Configuration

Model Attributes

open modeling interface
Open Modeling Interface

“The OpenMI provides a standard interface, which allows models to exchange data with each other and other modelling tools on a time step by time step basis as they run.”

--openmi.org

Metadata

www.openmi.org

the architecture of a model component
The Architecture of a Model Component

OpenMI

Interface

Initialize

PerformTimeStep

Finish

Procedural

Model

Web

Service

Interface

Data

config.xml

Input and Output Exchange Items, Time horizon and step, etc.

Supporting Libraries

CSDMS

Interface

Simple Model Wrapper

key advantages of componentization
Key Advantages of Componentization
  • subdivide a complicated task into a set of smaller, more manageable tasks
  • minimal restrictions on each component – only interfaces are standardized
  • Potential to maintain multiple interfaces for the same core model engine (i.e., support multiple modeling frameworks)
example application
Example Application
  • Modeling rainfall/runoff for Coweeta Watershed #18
  • HIS Server includes publically available Coweeta data
    • Precipitation: daily accumulated
    • Air temp: daily min, max, and mean
    • Stream discharge: daily average

Coweeta HIS Server

http://river.sdsc.edu/WaterOneFlow/Coweeta/cuahsi_1_1.asmx?WSDL

coweeta watershed 18
Coweeta Watershed #18

Watershed #18 Area: 12.48 ha (0.12 km2)

650m by 300 m

slide12

Background: Steps in the Hydrologic Modeling Process

Revise perceptions

The Perceptual Model:

deciding on the processes

Revise equations

The Conceptual Model:

deciding on the equations

Debug code

The Procedural Model:

getting the code to run on a computer

Revise parameter

values

Model Calibration:

getting values of parameters

Model Validation:

good idea but difficult in practice

Declare

Success?

No

Rainfall-Runoff Modeling: The Primer, Beven, 2001

Yes

perceptual model
Perceptual Model

What processes do I think will be dominate for this watershed and my specific study objectives?

conceptual model
Conceptual Model

What mathematical representation should we use to model the dominate processes?

  • Rainfall – Runoff: TOPMODEL (due to my perception about dominate runoff generation processes)
  • ET: Hargreaves (due to data availability)
    • Assume PET = ET for first model run
procedural model
Procedural Model

How can we construct an accurate, well tested procedural model that can be understood and shared with others?

  • Implement components
    • Hargreaves
    • TOPMODEL
  • Link components

into a model

  • Include data exchange with HydroDesktop
model calibration
Model Calibration

What should the model parameters be?

  • Edit component parameters from GUI
  • Save output as new “Method” (ODM terminology)
  • Automated calibration possible in the future
model validation evaluation
Model Validation/Evaluation

How did we do? (If not well, can we easily change assumptions from each of the previous steps to see impact on results?)

  • Visual inspection using HydroDesktop Graph View
  • Compare different scenario runs to observed data
  • Export data as CSV for further analysis in preferred software system
  • Calculation of performance metrics from within HydroDesktop possible in the future
models as web services
Models as Web Services
  • Climate model as a service for use in hydrologic models
  • Web Processing Services (WPS) that is wrapped as OpenMIcomponent on client side

Hydro Model

Collaboration with NOAA/ESMF team (Cecelia DeLucaet al.) and Ricky Rood. University of Michigan,

modeling large complex hydrologic systems
Modeling Large, Complex Hydrologic Systems

HPC Cluster

Job schedule determines if jobs should be run on a local HPC cluster to the cloud (Azure)

User creates model on desktop and submits to calibration tool

Cloud

Azure Compute Proxies

Collaboration with Marty Humphrey, UVA

Azure Compute Instances

open development model
Open Development Model
  • The HydroDesktopCodeplex site includes all source code for HydroModeler and a growing set of model components. We welcome the help of others in the development effort.

www.hydrodesktop.org

summary
Summary
  • HydroModeler is a framework for linking models and data to support hydrologic education and research.
  • Componentization is important for hydrologic modeling because there is “no commonly agreed modelling strategy for the rainfall-runoff process but a variety of options and approaches”
  • Open Development is critical for future success of any modeling system because it will rely on the contribution of individuals and groups interested in sharing codes and ideas
acknowledgments his project team and sponsors
Acknowledgments: HIS Project Team and Sponsors
  • University of Texas at Austin – David Maidment, Tim Whiteaker, James Seppi, Fernando Salas, Jingqi Dong, Harish Sangireddy
  • San Diego Supercomputer Center –IlyaZaslavsky, David Valentine, Tom Whitenack, Matt Rodriguez
  • Utah State University –Jeff Horsburgh, Kim Schreuders, Stephanie Reeder, Edward WaiTsui, RavichandVegiraju, KetanPatil
  • University of South Carolina – Jon Goodall, Anthony Castronova, Mostafa Elag, Ben Felton, Robert Boykin, Sharni Fuller
  • Idaho State University – Dan Ames, Ted Dunsford, JiříKadlec, Yang Cao, Dinesh Grover
  • Drexel University/CUNY – Michael Piasecki
  • WATERS Network – Testbed Data Managers
  • CUAHSI Program Office –Rick Hooper, YooriChoi, Conrad Matiuk
  • ESRI – Dean Djokic, Zichuan Ye

CUAHSI

HIS

Sharing hydrologic data

http://his.cuahsi.org/

Support:

EAR 0622374

CBET 0846244

hydromodeler workshops
HydroModeler Workshops
  • Today from 3:30-5 PM: Using HydroModeler
    • how to create and execute the Coweeta example
  • Friday 8-9:30 AM: Developing HydroModeler Components
    • how to create the Hargreaves component from start to finish
  • One-on-one help: Thursday from 3:30-5PM
  • If you are not able to attend the workshop, you can still work through the tutorials which are available in the HydroModelerhelp documentation
  • Questions?
    • Jon Goodall goodall@cec.sc.edu
design goals
Design Goals
  • Key design goals of HydroModeler are
    • (1) Enable code reuse and easily shared models
    • (2) Adopt existing standards when possible
    • (2) Leverage HydroDesktop’s visualization and data management capabilities.
component communication protocol
Component Communication Protocol

Model A

Exchange Item

Model A is dependent on and output produced by Model B

GetValues()

Model B

Models maintain their own “world view”

Models exchange data on each time step