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HISD Indoor Air Quality

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  1. HISDIndoor Air Quality EPA Tools for School

  2. What is Indoor Air Quality? Indoor Air Quality is the relative health of the air in an indoor environment, good or bad. Good IAQ- Minimal levels of indoor pollutants such as odors / fumes and particulates such as dust and pollens. Poor IAQ- Fumes, odors or particulates in excessive concentrations that may affect the health of the occupants.

  3. Why are IAQ and Asthma Issues Increasing Today? Today's buildings are constructed much tighter and offer less natural breathing ability and less fresh air. Many of the parts of today’s building are manufactured materials rather than natural materials used in the past People are spending more time indoors. The outdoor air has many and more contaminants today than in the past (auto exhaust, etc).

  4. Why should you be concerned about IAQ? • Poor IAQ can affect health. • Poor IAQ can affect concentration. • Indoor air pollutants are among the top five • environmental risks. • People spend about 90% of their time indoors so the • health problems that result from IAQ problems will • increase. • According to the World Health Organizations • approximately 30% of all commercial building have • significant IAQ problems.

  5. Health Effects due to poor IAQ • Headaches • Eye, nose, and throat • irritations • Respiratory illnesses • Increased allergies • Asthma • Lower tolerances to common illnesses and infections

  6. Contaminants that can cause Asthma/Allergy-like symptoms Moisture related:Non-moisture related: Molds VOC’s Cockroaches Chemicals Bacteria Pets Dust Mites Smoking

  7. Pollutant Sources: • Exterior SourcesInterior Sources • High Ozone Levels Materials and furnishings • Vehicle exhaust Equipment and activities • Outside activities Biological • Soil gasses People • Pollen/mold Re-entrainment

  8. Sources of Pollutants • Normal biological processes- People and pets generate CO2, • moisture and odors. • Combustion Appliances- stoves, furnaces, fireplaces • and gas heaters. • Use of consumer products- spray cans, air fresheners, cleaning supplies and construction materials. • Cigarette smoke • Soil under and around buildings. • Appliances- humidifier, air conditioner and nebulizers.

  9. Modern IAQ Problem Sources • Building Materials • Carpet • Furnishings • Paneling • Surface coatings • Adhesives • Fire Proofing • Insulation

  10. Modern IAQ Problem Sources • Building Operations: • Custodial/Maintenance • Café, shop, Bathroom Exhausts • Class Supplies(Art, Lab, Chemicals) • Product Incompatibility • Lawn Mowing, Watering • Aquariums/ Fountains • Classroom Pets • Open Windows/ Doors

  11. Modern IAQ Problem Sources • Human Factors: • Open Windows/ Doors • Stress Factors • Perfumes/Masking Agents • Individual Susceptibility • Psychosomatic responses • Carbon Dioxide Levels • Inconsistent Environmental Comfort • factors

  12. IAQ Problem Trends Clutter: Accumulates dust, prevents proper cleaning. Dust mites, insects and rodents love accumulations of dust and clutter. Surfaces out of reach of routine custodial operations accumulate dust. Plants: To much water provides a perfect environment for mold growth. Dead and dying plants provide a a perfect environment for mold and bacteria growth

  13. IAQ Problem Trends No Idling in Bus Lots! The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified 21 chemicals in bus and truck exhaust that are known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health effects. These include chemicals such as benzene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and 1,3 butadiene.

  14. Knowledge is Power-EPA IAQ Tools for Schools • A comprehensive resource to help maintain • healthy school environments to take effective • action to advance health, safety and wellness. • Includes: • IAQ Backgrounders • Checklists • Reference Guides • Problem Solving Wheel • Walk Through Video • Peer Mentors • EPA Staff

  15. IAQ Tools for Schools • National Program to provide schools with tools • to identify and resolve existing IAQ problems. • Team work-Administrators, teachers, school nurses, custodians, students and parents. • Action Checklists used to identify problems • that may lead to poor IAQ. • Auxiliary Services support to promptly • remedy current issues.

  16. IAQ Team Responsibilities & Roles

  17. IAQ Coordinator-Team Leader • Have a copy of the Emergency Plan • Know where the Safety Manual is located (Info on IPM; Pb; Radon in manual.) • Review with the team the IAQ policies. • Read Section 3-”Roles and Functions of the IAQ Coordinator. • Review with the team Tools for Schools - show the 30-minute, two-part videos • “Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools,” and • “The IAQ Tools for Schools Walkthrough Video.” • 6. When & how to distribute the Checklists as well as when they should • be returned. • Date of the first walk through • as well as who will be doing the walk through. • Team member responsibilities/ and allocation of different tasks • 7. Communication guidelines should be established. • This is referral of questions from the public and media to one central source. • 8. Distribute Checklist and Action Packets/ IAQ Backgrounder to participants. • 9. Provide an IAQ calendar, and use/schedule IAQ meetings & events.

  18. IAQ Team-Who are the team members? Administrator-Show leadership by providing a healthy indoor environment conducive to teaching and learning. Teacher-Ensure comfort, health, and reduced sick days for students and staff by preventing IAQ problems in the classroom. School Nurse-Recognize and monitor trends in reported illnesses that my give early warning of IAQ problems. Facilities Manager/Custodian- Ensure ventilation system clean and functioning properly; utilize the safest, most effective products; use proper waste disposal practices to control odors, pest, and contaminates. During repairs, minimized dust, fumes, and off -gassing from building materials. Food Service: Reduce moisture, odors, and food waste to lower the risk of short or long term health problems. Other possible members: Health and Physical Education Teacher-Health classes regarding IAQ ,ozone, and asthma Awareness are beneficial to the students and school team. Ancillary teachers-Art and Science-chemical pollutants from Science and art classes. Administrator-Show leadership by providing a healthy indoor environment conducive to teaching and learning. Teacher-Ensure comfort, health, and reduced sick days for students and staff by preventing IAQ problems in the classroom. School Nurse-Recognize and monitor trends in reported illnesses that might provide early warning of IAQ problems. Facilities Manager/Custodian- Ensure ventilation system is clean and functioning properly; utilize the safest, most effective products; use proper waste disposal practices to control odors, pest, and contaminants. During repairs, minimized dust, fumes, and off -gasses from building materials. Food Service: Reduce moisture, odors, and food waste to lower the risk of short or long term health problems. Other possible members: Health and Physical Education Teacher-Health classes regarding IAQ ,ozone, and asthma Awareness are beneficial to the students and school team. Ancillary teachers-Art and Science-chemical pollutants from Science and art classes.

  19. IAQ Team Responsibilities • IMPLEMENT THE “TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS” ACTION KIT • Be informed regarding EPA “Tools for Schools” program. • Be informed regarding HISD IAQ policies. • Apply IAQ policies on a daily basis. • Act as an IAQ Resource. • Be informed regarding Emergency Plan / Safety Manual. • Attend IAQ meetings. • Assist in activities and decisions that impact the indoor air quality in your • School. • Complete and distribute Checklists if designated. • Participate in periodic walkthroughs. • Assist IAQ coordinator with collecting IAQ information and handling IAQ concerns. • Attend IAQ Professional Developments / in-services.

  20. IAQ TEAM-Getting Started… • Create a filing system for paperwork. • Make copies of IAQ Coordinator’s forms. • Count the number of staff &job categories for checklists. • Set up a location for turning in checklists. • Provide school team with Action Packets • Get a map of the school. • Get list of contact information for outside contractors. • Set up an IAQ Resource Center in the lounge where IAQ information • Can be provided and posted for the staff. • Decide team meeting schedule, as well as when the committee will be • presenting IAQ information / progress to the faculty. • Most importantly: • BE PATIENT; STAY CONSISTENT; ORGANIZED & REMEMBER THIS TEAM IS • DOING SOMETHING IMPORTANT FOR THE STAFF & STUDENTS.

  21. IAQ Action KitWhat materials are in the Action Kit? • IAQ Coordinator’s Guide • IAQ Backgrounder-Background Informational piece for staff • Problem-Solving Wheel-identifies potential IAQ causes and solutions • Health Professional Guide. • 30 minute, 2-part Video- IAQ Tools for Schools & The IAQ Tools for Schools • Walkthrough Video. • -Checklists for: • Teachers • Administrative Staff • Health Officer’s-School Nurses • Food Service • Building Maintenance: • Ventilation • Waste Management • Renovations and Repairs • Walkthrough

  22. IAQ Problem? IAQ Problem? • Diagnosing can be tricky! • Acute (short-term) symptoms- colds, allergies, fatigue, or the flu. • These may be clues that can serve as indicators of a potential IAQ problem. • The symptoms are widespread within a class or school. • The symptoms disappear when the students or staff leave the school building for the day. • The onset is sudden after some change at school, • such as painting or pesticide application. • Persons with allergies, asthma, or chemical sensitivities have reactions • indoors but not outdoors. • A Doctor has found that a student or staff member has an indoor • air-related disease. • Long-term health effects often do not become evident for many years.

  23. What if you think you have an IAQ Problem? If the problem is self-evident, then correct the problem. If problem cannot be corrected or if it is a severe IAQ issue then the IAQ Coordinator/ team should investigate to make sure that potential causes of the problem have not been overlooked. 3. Obtain other assistance from within the school. Other departments (Customer Care Center) may need to be notified by IAQ Coordinator or Administrator. Utilize the IAQ PROBLEM SOLVING WHEEL

  24. Customer Care Center Customer Care Center handles Environmental; Grounds; HVAC; Housekeeping; IPM; Roofing; Sheet metal; Striping; Telecommunications; Electrical Q:   Whom do I contact to request a maintenance notification request?A:   Customer Care Center (713) 676-9450 Q:   How do I find out the status of a work order? A:   Contact your maintenance area and provide them with your notification number given to you by Customer Care Center Customer Care Center228 McCarty Dr. Bldg. #17Houston, Texas 77029Telephone:(713) 676-9450Fax:(713) 676-9530

  25. Local IAQ Services Provider’s List HISD IAQ Service Providers: Construction & Facilities Services- 713-676-9278 Facilities Maintenance-713-676-9250 Risk Management- 713-220-5092 Health & Medical Services-713-556-7280 Environmental Affairs & Hazardous Materials-713-676-9250 Local Health Department-Health and Human Services-832-393-5169 State Health Department-512-458-7111 or 1-888-963-7111

  26. Indoor Air Quality Program: Texas Department of State Health ServicesDivision for Regulatory Services Indoor Air Quality Program, MC #19871100 W. 49th Street Austin, TX,78756Call toll-free at 1-800-293-0753 ext. 2444 or 2428 General Fax: (512) 834-6707 IAQ Contact:Quade R. Stahlquade.stahl@dshs.state.tx.us IAQ Contacts/Resources IAQ Tools for Schools: Stacy Murphy murphy.stacy@epa.gov (214) 665-7116

  27. EPA Resources • EPA Publication/Resources are available at no cost. • You can order via the website:www.epa.gov/nscep • or phone- 1-800-490-9198. • IAQ Tools for Schools Action Kit. • IAQ Tools for Schools Roadmap. • IAQ Tools for Schools Problem Solving Wheel. • IAQ Tools for Schools Advantage Video. • IAQ Tools for Schools Fact Sheets. • Managing Asthma in the School. • Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma. • Find Information on Healthy School Environments Faster Fact Sheet. • Benefits of Improving Air Quality in the Indoor Environment. • Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Communication Guide.

  28. Remember: All that you do-makes a difference!!

  29. Post Test • The framework for effective school IAQ management requires 6 drivers. T F • There is no relationship between asthma and IAQ. T F • Health effects due to poor IAQ can include asthma, allergies, headaches, T F • and respiratory infections. • 4. Clutter does not play a role in IAQ. T F • Problems can be identified by performing campus walk-throughs, • completing the checklists and the using the Problem solving wheel. T F • 6. Some causes of asthma are mold, dust mites, smoke and pets. T F • 7. IAQ impacts students performance and health. T F • 8. Reviewing the contents of the “IAQ Tools for Schools” will give one an idea T F • of how everyone can play a role. • “Tools for Schools” is a program done by one person vs. a multidisciplinary T F • team. • 10. “Tools for Schools is a program that has many free resources provided • by EPA. T F