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Working with Young People to Construct Order out of Chaos. Paul Dalziel AERU, Lincoln University Presentation to the Careers Research Symposium: Order and Chaos Career Development Association of New Zealand University of Canterbury, 17 October 2013. Mihi.

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working with young people to construct order out of chaos

Working with Young People to Construct Order out of Chaos

Paul Dalziel

AERU, Lincoln University

Presentation to the Careers Research Symposium: Order and Chaos

Career Development Association of New Zealand

University of Canterbury, 17 October 2013

slide2
Mihi

E ngā tāne, e ngā wāhine, e tau nei, tēnākoutoukatoa.

Katinonuitākumihi o arohaki a koutoui tēneira.

Kei temihiahaukingātaonga o NgāiTahu,

tāngatawhenua o tēneiwahi.

Kaiti tāku mōhio o te reo Māori,

ēngarikeitemihiahauki tēneitaonga o ēneimotu.

Tēnākoutou. Tēnākoutou. Kia ora tātou katoa.

outline of the presentation
Outline of the Presentation
  • Brief introduction to the EEL programme.
  • A chaotic environment.
  • Empowering young people.
  • Organisational roles/models.
  • The changing role of the career practitioner.
brief introduction to eel
Brief Introduction to EEL
  • The Education and Employment Linkages research programme was funded by FRST, MSI and MBIE from June 2007 to September 2012.
  • There were four research leaders
    • Karen Vaughan (School Communities)
    • Jane Higgins (Regional Communities)
    • Hazel Phillips (Māori and Pacific Communities)
    • Paul Dalziel (Employer-Led Channels)
quasi mission statement of eel
Quasi Mission Statement of EEL

“At the centre of our research is the young person, a dynamic individual who is continuously constructing self-identities in diverse contexts, discovering and developing their personal abilities and making purposeful choices that are influenced by perceived and actual social, economic and cultural constraints.”

a chaotic environment
A Chaotic Environment

Private Trainers

Polytechnics

School Community

Wānanga

Employers

Universities

Family and Whānau

Gap Year(s)

coping with chaos
Coping with Chaos
  • Karen Vaughan (NZCER) has written an article “Learning Workers: Young New Zealanders and Early Career Development”, published in Vocations and Learning, 2010, Vol. 3: 157-178.
  • It presents results based on two sets of interviews with young people in the Pathways and Prospectsstudy led by NZCER.
key messages from vaughan s paper
Key messages from Vaughan’s paper
  • Young adults can be understood as learning-workers who actively develop their careers rather than simply enter them.
  • Some young adults experience lifelong learning as self-fulfilling while others experience it as burdensome.
empowering young people
Empowering Young People

Karen Vaughan’s article noted that (page 158): “Many policy messages in New Zealand have suggested that young people making seemingly messy or nonlinear transitions from school to tertiary education and work arise from not making the right choices.”

EEL tried to move away from that suggestion.

quasi mission statement of eel1
Quasi Mission Statement of EEL

“At the centre of our research is the young person, a dynamic individual who is continuously constructing self-identities in diverse contexts, discovering and developing their personal abilities and making purposeful choices that are influenced by perceived and actual social, economic and cultural constraints.”

empowerment through skills
Empowerment through Skills

“Skills have become the global currency of the 21st century. Without proper investment in skills, people languish on the margins of society, technological progress does not translate into economic growth, and countries can no longer compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society.”

(OECD, Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives, 2012)

policy has aimed at higher education levels
Policy has aimed at higher education levels
  • Raise the school leaving age to 16.
  • Increase the proportion of 18-year-olds with NCEA level 2 or equivalent qualification.
  • Increase the proportion of 25 to 34-year-olds with advanced trade qualifications, diplomas and degrees (at Level 4 or above).

These are not enough without other changes…

discipline through education

Individual Abilities

  • Education Investment
Discipline through Education

Human

Capital

display to potential employers

Individual Abilities

  • Education Investment
  • Employment Opportunities
Display to Potential Employers

Trusted

Qualifications

Human

Capital

matching skills

Individual Abilities

  • Education Investment
  • DiverseSkills
  • Employment Opportunities
Matching = Skills

Matching

Strengths

Trusted

Qualifications

Human

Capital

the four ds

Individual Abilities

  • Education Investment
  • Diverse Skills
  • Employment Opportunities
The Four Ds

Display

Matching

Strengths

Trusted

Qualifications

Discover

Discipline

Human

Capital

we have not been good at diversity
We have not been good at “Diversity”
  • Mark Oldershaw is chief executive of the Industry Training Federation:

“At the moment the senior secondary school programme is heavily structured around the ‘pathway’ to university.

The 70% of students who don’t go to university are not given the same clarity as to what they need to do get on a pathway to further training and work.”

recent positive developments
Recent Positive Developments
  • The curriculum in New Zealand schools is being broadened.
  • Links between schools and employers are being strengthened (e.g. Gateway).
  • Trades Academies and the Manukau Institute of Technology Tertiary High School have been established.
vocational pathways
Vocational Pathways
  • The Ministry of Education, the industry Training Federation and and individual ITOs have worked together to produce vocational pathways in the NCEA qualifications.
  • This will need support and resourcing in schools to realise its full potential.
labour market skills
Labour Market Skills

“Skills have become the global currency of the 21st century. Without proper investment in skills, people languish on the margins of society, technological progress does not translate into economic growth, and countries can no longer compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society.”

(OECD, Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives, 2012)

organisation roles models
Organisation Roles/Models

“In New Zealand, the introduction of standards-based secondary school qualifications in 2002 brought a great degree of flexibility to course content and the kind of learning that can be formally recognised, thereby demanding that young people make many more decisions, at earlier stages, about different credit combinations, qualifications, and pathways through school.” Vaughan (2010, p. 158)

a chaotic environment1
A Chaotic Environment

Private Trainers

Polytechnics

School Community

Wānanga

Employers

Universities

Family and Whānau

Gap Year(s)

careers offices as nodes in networks
Careers Offices as Nodes in Networks

Private Trainers

C.O.

Polytechnics

C.O.

School Community

C.O.

Wānanga

C.O.

Employers

Universities

C.O.

C.O. is the Careers Office

Family and Whānau

Gap Year(s)

the changing role of the career practitioner
The changing role of the career practitioner
  • One part of the EEL programme sought to understand whether the networking framework can be used to suggest how a university careers office can add value to its different stakeholders?
  • The research was based on “soft systems methodology” developed over 30 years at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom.
the research method
The Research Method
  • Checkland, P. and J. Poulter (2006) Learning for Action: A Short Definitive Account of Soft Systems Methodology and its Use for Practitioners, Teachers and Students. Chichester: John Wiley.
  • It is designed to produce insights into system behavior when people are acting purposively in pursuit of their own values and goals.
quasi mission statement of eel2
Quasi Mission Statement of EEL

“At the centre of our research is the young person, a dynamic individual who is continuously constructing self-identities in diverse contexts, discovering and developing their personal abilities and making purposeful choices that are influenced by perceived and actual social, economic and cultural constraints.”

careers new zealand
Careers New Zealand
  • Careers New Zealand provides the national backbone of careers information, advice and guidancefor these regional networks of careers offices.
  • It has published career education benchmarks for secondary schools and for tertiary institutions.
purposeful behavior of ci e
Purposeful Behavior of CI&E

CI&E proactively engages and works with students, faculties and employers achieving their career and employment-oriented goals,

by using its professional and financial resources to design and deliver an integrated set of services that adds value to these three groups,

in order to contribute to the overall mission of the University of Canterbury.

findings from the case study
Findings from the Case Study
  • The careers office can be a hub of career education networks.
  • It should build on what is already happening in employer engagement:
    • Employer recruitment visits to campus
    • Student part-time employment
    • Regional development agencies
slide38
Kuamututāku korero mo tēneirā.

That finishes my talk for today.

Ka tinonuitemahiimua.

There is a lot of work in front of us.

No reira, me āwhinatātouki a tātou.

Therefore, let us help each other.

Tēnākoutou. Tēnākoutou. Kia oratātoukatoa.

That is you. That is you.

May you and I, all of us, enjoy well-being.

slide39

Copies of the research reports produced in the Education Employment Linkages programme are available at:

www.eel.org.nz