chapter 7 section 3 pages 224 229 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 7 Section 3 Pages 224 - 229 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 7 Section 3 Pages 224 - 229

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 9

Chapter 7 Section 3 Pages 224 - 229 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 143 Views
  • Uploaded on

Chapter 7 Section 3 Pages 224 - 229 . The Era of Andrew Jackson. Political Party. Formed the new Democratic - Republican Party Opposed a strong federal government Opposed government spending Opposed the Bank of the United States Opposed corporate charters for banks and enterprises.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Chapter 7 Section 3 Pages 224 - 229' - honoria-merritt


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
chapter 7 section 3 pages 224 229

Chapter 7 Section 3

Pages 224 - 229

The Era of Andrew Jackson

political party
Political Party

Formed the new Democratic - Republican Party

Opposed a strong federal government

Opposed government spending

Opposed the Bank of the United States

Opposed corporate charters for banks and

enterprises

policies
Policies

Expanded voting rights

Over 1 million white males were able to vote in the election of 1828

(Free African Americans and women still could not vote)

Appealed to common peole, which earned him the nickname “Old Hickory”

“Spoils System” - appointees to federal jobs would serve four year terms,

which were usually his friends that replaced those appointed by JQA

“Kitchen cabinet” - name given to Jackson’s friends that became his advisors

because they supposedly slipped into the White House through the kitchen

removal of native americans
Removal of Native Americans

Indian Removal Act of 1830

The “Five Civilized Tribes” lived in Georgia, North and South Carolina,

Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee which was coveted by white

planters and miners

Jackson planned to move the Native Americans because he believed they could not assimilate and allowing them to stay would require too many federal troops to keep the peace

indian removal act 18301
Indian Removal Act 1830

The Federal government provided funds to

negotiate treaties that would force the Native

Americans to move west

President Jackson believed this was “not only

liberal, but generous”

In 1830, the Choctaw were pressured to sign a

treaty that required them to move from

Mississippi

In 1831, U.S. troops forcibly moved the Sauk

and Fox tribes from their lands in Illinois and

Missouri

In 1832, the Chickasaw were forced to leave

their lands in Alabama and Mississippi

the cherokee fight back
The Cherokee fight back

Worcester v Georgia (1832) the Cherokee nation won recognition as a distinct political community

The Supreme Court ruled that Georgia was not

entitled to regulate the Cherokee nor invade their lands

President Jackson refused to abide by the Supreme Court

decision by saying, “John Marshall has made his decision;

now let him enforce it”

The Treaty of Echota gave the last 8 million acres of

Cherokee land to the federal government in exchange for

$5 million and land west of the Mississippi

General Winfield Scott drove the remaining Cherokees

out of their lands

trail of tears
Trail of Tears

October - November 1838 the Cherokee

were sent in groups of 1,000

The journey to their “new home” was

800 miles by steamboat and railroad,

but mostly by foot

During the winter portion of the journey,

many Cherokee died

Government officials stole the Cherokee’s

money and outlaws stole their livestock

The Cherokee buried more than a quarter

of its people

When the Cherokee arrived in Oklahoma,

they realized their new lands were not as

fertile as the lands they were forced to leave

synthesis question
Synthesis Question

Were the actions of the Jackson administration ethical?

Which of the Five Approaches to ethics did Jackson break? Cite with specific examples

Would you consider the Indian Removal Act of 1830 a form a genocide? Why?