abolitionism n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Abolitionism PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Abolitionism

play fullscreen
1 / 16
Download Presentation

Abolitionism - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

hong
168 Views
Download Presentation

Abolitionism

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Abolitionism

  2. Questions for today: Who were the abolitionists? What were the contested issues regarding the abolition of slavery? Outline 1) African American abolitionists 2) White Southern abolitionists 3) American Colonization Society (ACS) 4) American Anti-Slavery Society 5) William Lloyd Garrison: 6) Pro-Slavery Responses 7) Disagreement among abolitionists

  3. 1. African-American abolitionists(50 abolitionist societies by 1830)Harriet Tubman Sojourner Truth

  4. 2. White southern abolitionists • ¾ white Southerners owned no slaves • Resentment of slave-based wealth • Fear of slave insurrections • Angelina and Sarah Grimké (SC): speaking tours against slavery

  5. 3. American Colonization Society(ACS) • Compensation to slaveholders • Transportation of free blacks to Africa (Liberia) • Could not imagine peaceful coexistence of whites and freed slaves

  6. 4. American Anti-Slavery Society(1833-1865) • Spread abolitionism throughout the North • 250,000 members in 1838

  7. “Torturing American Citizens” (1838)

  8. How to end slavery? • Immediate or gradual emancipation? • Compensation to slaveholders for lost property (freed slaves)? • Political process? Moral suasion? Use of force? • “Colonization” (removal) to Africa?

  9. 5. William Lloyd Garrison • President of the Amer Anti-Slavery Society 1843-1865 • Published The Liberator from 1831-1860 • Radical and militant

  10. The Liberator • Addressed Northerners • Immediate abolition • Opposed compensation for slaveholders • Religious zeal • Opposed colonization because: • slaves are Americans • Whites can unlearn racism

  11. Moral Suasion • Persuasion, not politics • Boycott a corrupt political system • “No union with slaveholders”

  12. 6. Pro-Slavery Responses • Abolitionists were inciting a race war • Gag rule in Congress (1836): no discussion of antislavery petitions • Pro-Slavery argument • Riots against African Americans and white abolitionists

  13. 7. Disagreements among abolitionists • 1840: Split over use of political means • Equal role of women in American Anti-Slavery Society

  14. Frederick Douglass • Wanted inclusion in the political process • Most concerned about enslaved Americans

  15. Douglass defends the Constitution • “Glorious Liberty Document” • “We the People” means everyone • Not necessarily a pro-slavery document • Reform, not revolution