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Fine Tuning the IEP: Effective Practices for Transition Planning PowerPoint Presentation
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Fine Tuning the IEP: Effective Practices for Transition Planning. How do we measure IEP Compliance?. Examine the Required Components of the IEP as defined by the NSTTAC: National Transition Technical Assistance Center. Measurable Post Secondary Goals

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Fine Tuning the IEP: Effective Practices for Transition Planning


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    1. Fine Tuning the IEP: • Effective Practices for Transition Planning

    2. How do we measure IEP Compliance?

    3. Examine the Required Components of the IEP as defined by the NSTTAC: National Transition Technical Assistance Center Measurable Post Secondary Goals Post Secondary goals that are updated annually Goals that are based on age appropriate assessment Annual goal (s) related to the student’s transition service needs Transition services (Action Steps) Agency Participation/ Student/Parent Consent Documented Student Invitation Course of Study (Individual Graduation Plan)

    4. NEW

    5. Common Errors In Post Secondary Goals The post secondary goal is NOT measurable Employment • James wants to become an entrepreneur at some point in his life Education/Training • James is thinking about attending Baton Rouge Community College for business classes.

    6. Measurable Post Secondary Goals • Must have “will” statements • Must occur “after high school”

    7. Employment After high school, James will open his own business Best Practice: After high school, I will open my own business

    8. Education Training After high school, James will attend Baton Rouge Community College Best Practice: After high school, I will attend BRCC

    9. Independent Living After completion of High School, Lisa will live with others in a group home Best Practice: After completion of high school, I will live with others in a group home

    10. Common Questions • What about students with significant disabilities? Scenario • Bobby has significant limitations across all areas of functioning, as well as being medically fragile. • Typical training programs may not benefit his quality of life. • He will require full time nursing care. Additionally, a recreational day service program designed for individuals with significant medical needs will probably be most appropriate following high school.

    11. The goals could look like this: • Education/Training • After graduation, Bobby will participate in an in-home or center-based program designed to provide habilitative and vocational training with medical and therapeutic supports. • Employment • Upon completion of high school, Bobby will work completing daily clearing of the table in the home using tactile cues.

    12. Reviewing Post Secondary Goals • It is possible for a student to have the same post secondary goal for more than one year; however, you must examine his/her present level of performance to see if the post secondary goal needs to be modified.

    13. Independent Living • After graduation, Bobby will live at home and participate, to the maximum extent possible, in his daily routines (e.g. feeding, dressing, bathing, choice making, etc.). • After graduation, Bobby will participate in community-integrated recreational/leisure activities at the YMCA, going to movies, going to church. • After graduation, Bobby will utilize an augmentative communication device at home and in the community that allows individuals to communicate with him regarding needs, wants, and desires. • * if a student is unable to communicate verbally it is feasible to gain input from the family and IEP team members

    14. What if the student does not meet the goal? • IDEA 2004 does not require that LEAs are held accountable for the attainment of post secondary goals. The stated post secondary goals are required components of transition planning. There are numerous factors that positively or negatively affect an adult acquisition of goals for which the school could not be held accountable. The purpose of the legislation is that a student’s education program supports his/her goals beyond secondary school.

    15. Annual Goals

    16. Annual goals • When writing an annual goal you must consider how this goal will assist the student in achieving his/her post secondary goal Education Need Area: Academic/ Cognitive Content Area: Should NOT Be Transition This affects GEE/ LAA2 Waivers eligibility

    17. Annual Goals Education Need Area: Academic/ Cognitive Content Area: Should NOT Be Transition This affects GEE/ LAA2 Waivers eligibility Present Level: Must include student’s level of performance including student’s current transition assessments. Measurable Academic/Functional Goal: The goal should work towards the student’s future employment or postsecondary education or independent living * Speech only students must have a transition services plan

    18. Agency Participation • Student or Parent must provide consent to invite other agencies. • Must document if consent was not obtained • Must provide other methods of attempts at agency linkage

    19. Action Steps Common Errors NA is only used under the following conditions • The independent living action steps do not apply to the student

    20. Common Errors with Documentation No documentation of student invitation to IEP (even when students are invited verbally it must be documented in a communication log) No Course of Study No justification statement when an agency does not participate No justification for missing information on Action Steps

    21. Age Appropriate Assessments • There are two types of assessments: Informal and Formal • Use what is available in your district • There are several informal assessments that are available online (Casey Life Skills Assessment, Informal interest inventory- see handouts for current list) • Take advantage of the statewide assessments such as ILeap, Leap, GEE, LAA2, LAA1. This will provide up to date skill level information.