culture in the 1930s n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Culture in the 1930s PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Culture in the 1930s

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 27

Culture in the 1930s - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 483 Views
  • Uploaded on

Culture in the 1930s. 23.4. MAIN IDEA. Motion pictures, radio, art and literature blossomed during the New Deal. WHY IT MATTERS NOW The films, music, art, and literature of the 1930s still captivate today’s public. NAMES AND TERMS. Gone With the Wind Orson Welles Grant Wood

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Culture in the 1930s' - hayes


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
main idea
MAIN IDEA
  • Motion pictures, radio, art and literature blossomed during the New Deal.

WHY IT MATTERS NOW

  • The films, music, art, and literature of the 1930s still captivate today’s public
names and terms
NAMES AND TERMS
  • Gone With the Wind
  • Orson Welles
  • Grant Wood
  • Richard Wright
  • The Grapes of Wrath
the lure of motion pictures radio
The Lure of Motion Pictures & Radio
  • MOVIES:
    • Cost: $.25
    • 65% of Americans went to movies once a week
    • 15,000 movie theater – more than the # of banks, twice the number of hotels
  • RADIO:
    • Sold: 13 million in 1930, 28 million in 1940
    • ½ of all American households owned a radio
hollywood takes center stage
Hollywood takes center stage
  • Film stars:
    • Clark Gable
    • Marlene Dietrich
    • Jimmy Cagney
slide7

REALITY OF THE

DEPRESSION

radio
RADIO
  • Drama and variety
    • War of the Worlds
  • Orson Welles later

directed movie classics:

“Citizen Kane” &

“Touch of Evil”

slide18

The Arts in Depression America

  • Art, music, literature
    • Sober and serious
    • But conveyed an uplifting message about strength of character and democratic values
  • Many artists supported the New Deal’s spirit of social and political change
  • Many of them also received financial support from the New Deal (Harry Hopkins and the WPA)
    • “They’ve got to eat just like other people.”
slide19

Federal Art Project

  • Paid artists a living wage
  • Aimed to increase public appreciation of art & promote positive images of America
  • Artists:
    • created posters
    • taught art in schools
    • created murals
      • These murals were inspired by Diego Rivera
      • Focused on dignity of ordinary Americans at work
slide24

Woodie Gutherie

  • Music to capture the hardships of Depression America
slide25

Writers

  • Supported by Federal Writers’ Project
  • Future Pulitzer Prize winner – Saul Bellow – first job
  • Richard Wright – African-American writer, Native Son (1940)
  • Zora Neale Hurston – Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
  • John Steinbeck – Grapes of Wrath (1939)
slide26

And more writers...

  • James T. Farrell: Studs Lonigan trilogy (’32-’35)
    • Bleak picture of working class life in Irish neighborhood of Chicago
  • Jack Conroy: The Disinherited (1933)
    • Violence & poverty in Missouri coal fields
  • James Agee & photographer Walker Evans teamed up for Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941)
    • Deals w/ difficult life of poor farmers – dignity & strength of character
  • Thornton Wilder – Our Town (a play written in ’38) beauty of small town New England life
to sum up
To sum up . . .
  • Though artists and writers recognized America’s flaws, they contributed positively to New Deal legacy
  • Intellectuals praised the virtues of American life
  • They took pride in the country’s traditions and accomplishments.