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Bridging the Masonic Generation Gap. Sources: A. Gustafson, AAUW Membership Committee C. Jones, AAUW Director – Membership-2005 MWB R. Conley PGM MI - Stick ball to star wars MWB N. Neddermeyer PGM , MN. Bridging the Generation Gap. The Goal of this session is to identify:

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bridging the masonic generation gap

Bridging the Masonic Generation Gap

Sources: A. Gustafson, AAUW Membership Committee

C. Jones, AAUW Director – Membership-2005

MWB R. Conley PGM MI - Stick ball to star wars

MWB N. Neddermeyer PGM , MN

bridging the generation gap
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • The Goal of this session is to identify:
    • Who are today’s potential “new brothers”? How do you reach them, get them to join and ultimately keep them?
    • What membership resources are available to help you? How do you show the “value of belonging” to our organization
bridging the generation gap3
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • Targeting new audiences for membership growth
    • Who’s out there?
    • How do you understand them?
    • How do you use that knowledge to communicate with them?
    • How do you get them to join?!
slide4

Bridgingthe Generation Gap

  • Reaching out to different generations is a key to growth, our largest “new” audience is vast.
    • Who are they?
    • How do we understand them better?
    • How do we communicate with them so they see the importance of being a Mason?
bridging the generation gap5
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • Who’s out there?
    • The Silent or Greatest Generation
    • Baby Boomers or Baby Busters
    • Generation X
    • Generation Y: otherwise know as “Nexters” or “Millennials” or “Generation Next
bridging the generation gap6
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • The Silent or Greatest Generation
    • Born before 1946; strong traditional views of religon, family, and country.
    • Focus: include respect for authority, loyalty, hard work, and dedication. Security, stability and now health care are their main issues.
    • Known as “joiners”, Many joined Masonry
    • Like the written word in a formal format (few pictures) and
    • Came through the ranks (ie paid their “volunteer dues”) to ultimately take leadership.
bridging the generation gap7
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • Baby Boomers or Baby Busters
    • Born between 1946 – 1964; did not experience the same difficulties as their parents.
    • Were influenced by the civil rights movement, women's liberation, the space program, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War.
    • They are known to place a high value on youth, health, personal gratification, and material wealth.
    • Baby Boomers are optimistic and believe their generation changed the world. Personal values, respect and success - main motivators.
bridging the generation gap8
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • Generation X
    • Born between 1965-1980
    • Tend to be nontraditional, interested in new concepts and products and have a global mindset.
    • Called the “misunderstood” generation.
      • Often thought to be lazy, selfish and “don't want to get involved.”
      • In reality: need personally relevant value – the answer to “What’s in it for me?” and want active participation as problem solvers.
    • Key motivator is an enjoyable experience.
  • Main sources: Cynthia D’Amour, “Engaging Generation X Members,, and Phyllis I. Pieffer, “Globalization, governance and generational issues”, American Music Teacher, Dec04 Music Teachers National Association, Inc
bridging the generation gap9
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • Generation Y
    • Born between 1980-2000; have no recollection of the Reagan era, do not remember the Cold War, and have known only one Germany. Their world has always had AIDS, answering machines, microwave ovens, and videocassette recorders.
    • This generation includes more than 81 million people, approximately 30%, of the current population - and are greater in number than the Baby Boom generation.
    • They will influence changes in the work environment, just as the Baby Boomers did in the past.
    • They will join us but they need to be listened to.They demand input.

Source: Sherry L. Clausing, Doris L. Kurtz, Judith Prendeville, Janet Lynn Walt, “Generational diversity—the nexters”, AORN Journal, Sept, 2003

  • Main sources: Cynthia D’Amour, “Engaging Generation X Members, and Phyllis I. Pieffer, “Globalization, governance and generational issues”, American Music Teacher, Dec04 Music Teachers National Association, Inc
my generation is viewed positively by other generations
My generation is viewed positively by other generations.
  • 30% of Boomers said NO
  • 24% of Traditionalists said NO
  • And for Xers 60% said NO
  • Source: When Generations Collide, by Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman published by Harper Press
what can be done
What can be done?
  • Change focus of “us” to “them”
  • Learn that Membership is the only reason for our existence.
  • Focus on important things, not extemporaneous things.
  • Give them what they want.
bridging the generation gap12
Bridging the Generation Gap
  • Communication Tips:
  • Mature Generation: Build trust; face-to-face; written; more formal
  • Baby Boomers: Speak in an open direct style; answer questions directly and expect to be pressed for details
  • Generation X: Learn their language and speak it; use e-mail as your primary communication tool; talk in short sound bytes to keep their attention; share information with them immediately and often
  • Generation Y: Let your language paint visual pictures; use e-mail and voicemail as primary communication tools; constantly seek their feedback

Source: S. L. Clausing, D. L. Kurtz, J. Prendeville, Janet Lynn Walt, “Generational diversity—the nexters”,

bridging the gap
Bridging the Gap

What challenges & opportunities do these differences bring?

    • New ways of doing business
    • Have younger members chair committees usually reserved for the elder
    • Use of ad-hoc committees for short-time commitment
    • The new meeting – high tech gadgets on site; CD’s to take back with them; what to offer if they can’t attend?
  • Source: C. W. Zust, M.A., “Baby Boomer Leaders Face Challenges Communicating Across Generations
new member bonding steps
New Member Bonding Steps
  • Listen to the new member
  • No man stands alone
  • Make it personal
  • Concentrate on the right things
understanding the difference
Understanding the Difference
  • 40 years ago “Top Down Management” was expected and respected
  • Today “Servant Based Leadership” is expected and respected.