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Student Inquiry: Teaching for Real Meaning

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  1. Student Inquiry: Teaching for Real Meaning If I don’t see things differently, I haven’t learned Don Jones donjones@csu.edu.au PowerPoint available at http://www.chatt.hdsb.ca/~jonesdo/

  2. Inquiry-based Learning "Inquiry-based learning is an approach to teaching and learning that places students questions, ideas and observations at the centre of the learning experience" http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/CBS_InquiryBased.pdf

  3. Share an Object Find a partner First person tell your partner about your object. Partner listens, asks questions, etc. Second person show the artifact, don’t tell your partner about the artifact. Prompt them to try to figure it out from visible evidence, and questions. You may provide bits of information as questioned or redirect thinking, but allow them to figure out as much as possible on their own. Tell the story at the end. Don’t share the second artifact...yet!

  4. Teller? Teacher?

  5. To tell or not to tell... When? ...is the question

  6. Teaching with Objects http://www.allaboutshoes.ca/images/en/pdfs/teachers_resources/chronicles/activities_projects/activity2_teaching_yourself.pdf http://www.indiana.edu/~mathers/Tops.pdf

  7. Non-interpreted Primary Sources

  8. New ArtifactIt’sEvidence. Evidence Of What?

  9. Initiating Phase

  10. Something Experiential Careful observations – Using your senses, what do you notice? • Document with images, symbols, graphics, organizers to show relationships, sounds and words • DO • Take photos • Caption • Label • Get close • Get far

  11. Observe, Question and Speculate

  12. Good inquiry questions can start with...

  13. Concepts of Disciplinary Thinking p. 13

  14. Thinking Concepts pp. 58-60

  15. Don’t Forget Success Criteria https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bzy8XtLWGnRddE1QOW5MakZqU28/edit

  16. Convergent Divergent

  17. New Artifact (or Place)It’sEvidence. Evidence Of What?

  18. Observe, Question and Speculate

  19. Museums of Burlington CLASSROOM EDUCATION KIT If you would like to experience some of the many heritage stories of Burlington, but are unable to visit, this ‘Museum in a Box’ contains various learning and fun materials to either take a walk down memory lane or learn about the distant past.  Discover the importance of local history through the Ireland family, Joseph Brant and other prominent Burlington families without leaving your home.  Learn more about pioneer and early urban life in Burlington spanning the years 1830 to 1910 through activities, crafts and hands-on artifacts.  *10 day minimum rental, $50 refundable damage deposit  https://museumsofburlington.com/ireland-house

  20. Topics and Strands – Social Studies

  21. Experiential Topics and Strands (p. 19)

  22. One Cubic Foot http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2010/02/cubic-foot/liittschwager-photography#/video/

  23. what kind of inquiry will help uncover answers, solutions, or ideas? Now that you have a question…

  24. Inquiry as Experimentation

  25. Inquiry as Technological Problem-Solving

  26. Inquiry as Research

  27. The Inquiry Process in S&T Language

  28. Inquiry in SS • Evaluate and Draw Conclusions • Synthesize data, evidence and/or information and make informed, critical judgements based on that data, evidence add/or information • Gather and Organize • Collect and organize relevant data, evidence, and/or information from primary and secondary sources and or field studies • Interpret and Analyse • Analyse the data, evidence and information, using different types of graphic organizers as appropriate • Formulate Questions • Formulate questions related to the applicable overall expectations in order to identify the focus of their inquiry • Communicate • Communicate judgements, decisions, conclusions, predictions, and/or plans of action, clearly and logically SS Curriculum p.23

  29. How do they progress from grade to grade?

  30. Appendix C pp.192-197

  31. Graphing Skills p.198

  32. Input & Critical Interpretation Open Coupled Guided Structured Creative Expression & Action Martin-Hansen, L. (2002). Defining inquiry: Exploring the many types of inquiry in the science classroom. Science Teacher, 69(2), 34-37.

  33. Research Skills – Using Primary and Secondary Sources

  34. Click to View A Classroom Example of Investigating Pictures – Grades 1 & 2 Kevin Phillips – Exploring Big Ideas with Images - Grade 6 what can it look like in the Classroom?

  35. Interesting vs. Important Inquiry in the Classroom http://www.learner.org/workshops/teachreading35/classrooms/cv8.html

  36. An Approach to Inquiry An example of a short inquiry structure Access to this series will be available in the near future from OESSTA (Ontario Elementary Social Studies Teachers’ Association)

  37. Open Coupled Guided Structured Rather than telling answers... find a way to help give students the tools to figure things out themselves

  38. Natural Curiosity(2011) Click to download http://www.naturalcuriosity.ca/pdf/NaturalCuriosityManual.pdf

  39. Essentially Science and Technology(2009-2010) • Includes a unit for all strands in the Ontario Curriculum Grades 4-6: Science and Technology • Specifically designed units for combined grade classes http://www.pearsoncanadaschool.com/index.cfm?locator=PS1zRo&PMDBSUBCATEGORYID=26225&PMDBSITEID=2621&PMDBSUBSOLUTIONID=&PMDBSOLUTIONID=25862&PMDBSUBJECTAREAID=&PMDBCATEGORYID=25879&PMDbProgramID=73021

  40. Explorations (2014) • Explorations K-2 offers... • A rich variety of ideas for introducing and facilitating inquiry in the classroom • Essential questions that engage students and then invite and support them to explore and understand their world through inquiry • Opportunities for children to collaborate, to think critically and creatively, and to communicate their ideas • A variety of invitations, prompts and activities that can lead to powerful learning • Suggestions for identifying and encouraging children’s development, interests, and ability to self-regulate http://www.pearsoncanadaschool.com/index.cfm?locator=PS1f39&PMDBSUBCATEGORYID=&PMDBSITEID=2621&PMDBSUBSOLUTIONID=&PMDBSOLUTIONID=25862&PMDBSUBJECTAREAID=&PMDBCATEGORYID=25875&PMDbProgramID=88721

  41. Flip Point of View http://education.scholastic.ca/productlist/FLIP_POINTOFVIEW

  42. More Reading Pictures http://sourcedocs.tc2.ca/picture-sets/topics1/ancient-egypt/daily-life.html

  43. “Inquirizing”Turn telling into inquiry

  44. Inquiry Is Genuine When... “...it is not essentially a matter of finding out what others know (students must, of course, do this) but more a matter of reaching conclusions, making decisions, and solving problems using the available tools and information. In a genuine inquiry students are expected to make their own assessments and ground them in careful analysis of diverse data sources, and not simply to locate the conclusions offered by others.” Teaching about Geographical Thinking, p.10

  45. Inquiry-based Approach “Teachers using an inquiry-based approach encourage students to ask and genuinely investigate their own questions about the world. Teachers further facilitate students’ learning by providing a variety of tools, resources, and experiences that enable learners to investigate, reflect, and rigorously discuss potential solutions to their own questions about a topic the class is studying.” (Chiarotto 2011, p.7) Chiarotto, L. . (2011). Natural curiosity: Building children's understanding of the world through environmental inquiry / a resource for teachers. Oshawa: Maracle Press Ltd.

  46. Inquiry • Research (observationor secondary resources) What are some general characteristics of …? How can we classify…? • Experimentation (with variables) How does (independent) … impact (dependent)? • Tech Problem-Solving (challenge) How can we make something that will…? What are the important variables or attributes?

  47. Turning a “Recipe” into Inquiry Experimentizing and Problematizing recipes… Spangler science http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments • Published “science experiments” are often recipes… • Recipes are notexperiments • Recipes assume a specific result • Experiments seek to understand outcomes through controlled, independent and dependent variables or fair tests • Tech Problem-Solvingseeks to control the results

  48. Okay…let’s turn this into inquiry! 2.2 investigate the components of soil (e.g., nonliving things such as pebbles and decaying matter; living things such as organic matter, bacteria, earthworms, and insects), the condition of soil(e.g., wet, dry), and additives found in soil (e.g., pesticides, fertilizers, salt), using a variety of soil samples (e.g., sand, clay, loam) fromdifferent local environments, and explain how the different amounts of these components in a soil sample determine how the soil can be used Grade 3

  49. 2.2 investigate the components of soil (e.g., nonliving things such as pebbles and decaying matter; living things such as organic matter, bacteria, earthworms, and insects), the condition of soil(e.g., wet, dry), and additives found in soil (e.g., pesticides, fertilizers, salt), using a variety of soil samples (e.g., sand, clay, loam) fromdifferent local environments, and explain how the different amounts of these components in a soil sample determine how the soil can be used Research from Primary and Secondary Sources: What are the components of soil? What are the conditions of soil? What are the additives in soil? Experimentation: How do the components of soil effect plant growth/building? How do the conditions of soil effect plant growth/structure? How do the additives of soil effect plant growth? Technological Problem Solving: How can we grow the tallest plant? How can we grow a plant sideways? How can we grow the healthiest plant? How can we grow....? How can we construct a structure that withstands wind/flooding/rain/slope? • How would you get the students to answer these questions? • What could you use as a hook?

  50. Okay…turn this into inquiry! 7. investigate, in various ways, how different forces make things move (e.g., observe the effect that wind has on different objects, try out different ways to make a boat move in water, try to make a waterwheel move with water, explore ways in which different toys move) Kindergarten