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Chapter 11 Communicating in Person, by Telephone, and in Meetings. Intended Learning Outcomes. Discuss improving face-to-face workplace communication including using your voice as a communication tool. Specify procedures for promoting positive workplace relations through conversation.

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Chapter 11 Communicating in Person, by Telephone, and in Meetings


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    1. Chapter 11 Communicating in Person, by Telephone, and in Meetings

    2. Intended Learning Outcomes • Discuss improving face-to-face workplace communication including using your voice as a communication tool. • Specify procedures for promoting positive workplace relations through conversation. • Review techniques for offering constructive criticism on the job, responding professionally to workplace criticism, and resolving workplace conflicts.

    3. Intended Learning Outcomes • Identify ways to polish your professional telephone skills, including traditional phones and cell phones. • List techniques for making the best use of voice mail. • Discuss procedures for planning and participating in productive business and professional meetings.

    4. Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool (1) Improve your pronunciation • “naturally” – not “natcherly” • “accessory” – not “assessory” • “don’t you” – not “doncha”

    5. Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool (2) Work on the quality of your voice • Do you sound friendly, alert, or positive? • Do you sound angry, slow-witted, or negative?

    6. Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool (3) Use an appropriate pitch to attract listeners. When the voice rises and falls in conversational tones: attractive Flat, monotone voice: boring and ineffectual Moderate low voice: pleasing and professional

    7. Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool (4) Adjust the volume of your voice and your rate of speech • Speak as loudly or softly as the occasion demands. • Don’t make your listeners strain to hear you. • Don’t speak too rapidly.

    8. Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool (5) Use emphasis to express meaning • Stress the words that require emphasis. • Use of a lower pitch and volume can make you sound professional or reasonable.

    9. Promoting Positive Workplace Relations • Use correct names and titles. • Choose appropriate workplace topics. • Avoid negative remarks. • Listen and learn. • Give sincere and specific praise.

    10. Offering Constructive Criticism on the Job (1) • Mentally outline your conversation. • Use face-to-face communication. • Focus on improvement (offer to help). • Be specific; avoid broad generalizations. • Focus on the behavior, not the person. • Use “we” rather than “you.”

    11. Offering Constructive Criticism on the Job (2) • Encourage two-way communication. • Avoid anger, sarcasm, and a raised voice. • Keep it private.

    12. Responding Professionally to Workplace Criticism (1) • Listen without interrupting. • Determine the speaker’s intent. • Acknowledge what you are hearing. • Paraphrase what was said. • If necessary, ask for more information. • Agree -- if the comments made are fair.

    13. Responding Professionally to Workplace Criticism (2) • Disagree respectfully and constructively - if you feel the comments made are unfair. • Look for a middle position.

    14. Common Conflict Response Patterns • Avoidance/withdrawal: lose – lose situation • Accommodation/smoothing: minor issue • Compromise: when a predetermined ideal situation is not required • Competition/forcing: when the parties recognize the power relationship between themselves • Collaboration/problem solving: when the involved people have common goals

    15. Six-Step Procedure for Dealing With Conflict • Listen carefully. Understand the problem. • Understand the other point of view. • Show a concern for the relationship. • Look for common ground. • Invent new problem-solving options. • Reach an agreement based on what’s fair.

    16. Making Effective Telephone Calls (1) Placing Calls • Plan a mini agenda. • Use a three-point introduction: • State your name. • State your affiliation. • Give a brief explanation of why you are calling. • Be brisk if you are rushed. • Be cheerful and accurate. • Bring it to a close.

    17. Making Effective Telephone Calls (2) • Avoid telephone tag. • Leave complete voice-mail messages.

    18. Making Effective Telephone Calls (3) Receiving Calls • Identify yourself immediately. • Be responsive and helpful. • Be cautious when answering calls for others. • Take messages carefully. • Explain what you are doing when transferring calls.

    19. Practicing Courteous and Responsible Cell Phone Use Be courteous to those around you • Observe wireless-free quiet areas. • Speak in low, conversational tones. • Take only urgent calls. • Drive now, talk later. • E.g., Japan

    20. The Best Use of Voice Mail Announce your voice mail. Prepare a warm and informative greeting. Test your message.

    21. Meetings (1) Planning a Meeting • Ask yourself whether a meeting is really necessary. • Invite only key individuals. • Prepare an agenda (include topics, times, and names).

    22. Meetings (2) • Conducting a Meeting • Start the meeting on time. • Begin with an introduction that establishes the goal and length of the meeting. • Provide the background of topics or problems, state possible solutions and constraints. • Present a tentative agenda.

    23. Meetings (3) • Establish ground rules. • Appoint a secretary, who will take minutes, and a recorder, who will track ideas on a flipchart. • Encourage participation by all, but avoid digressions. • When the group reaches consensus, summarize and ask for confirmation.

    24. Dealing with Conflict Conflict is natural and not always negative in a workplace. When a conflict develops, allow each to make a complete case before the group.

    25. Handling Dysfunctional Group Members (1) Lay down the rules in an opening statement. Seat potentially dysfunctional members strategically. Avoid direct eye contact. Assign specific tasks to dysfunctional members.

    26. Handling Dysfunctional Group Members (2) Ask members to speak in a specific order. Interrupt monopolizers. Encourage nontalkers. Give praise and encouragement.

    27. Ending & Following Up Concluding a Meeting and Following Up • End the meeting on time. • Summarize the results achieved. • Distribute minutes of the meeting a few days later. • Remind group members of their follow-up assignments.

    28. Questions ?

    29. End