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Developing Aircraft. Overview. Key individuals involved in early aircraft development The names and anatomy of period aircraft The significance of other American pioneers in aviation following the Wright brothers. Quick Write.

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overview
Overview
  • Key individuals involved in early aircraft development
  • The names and anatomy of period aircraft
  • The significance of other American pioneers in aviation following the Wright brothers

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

quick write
Quick Write

Both the Wright Brothers and Glenn Curtiss were heavily involved with bicycles before taking up flight.

What similarities do you see between bicycles, early motorcycles, and early airplanes?

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

key individuals involved in early aircraft development

Calbraith Perry Rodgers

LouisBlériot

Alberto Santos-Dumont

Key Individuals Involved in Early Aircraft Development
  • In the first decade of the 1900s the Wright brothers were making aviation history
  • But other people were also becoming aviation pioneers

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute(Dumont)

Taken from wikipedia.com (Bierot and Rogers)

glenn curtiss
Glenn Curtiss
  • Thomas Baldwin was looking for a lightweight engine for his dirigible
  • He saw how well Curtiss’s bike engine performed and asked if he could buy one
  • Curtiss agreed and tweaked one of his engines for use in an aircraft
  • Baldwin’s aircraft, with a Curtiss engine, was the first powered dirigible in America

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of Underwood & Underwood/Corbis

the aerial experiment association
The Aerial Experiment Association
  • Curtiss joined the Aerial Experiment Association
  • Alexander Graham Bell—best known as inventor of the telephone—formed this group
  • The group made some important design breakthroughs
  • First, they built the first American plane equipped with ailerons

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

the aerial experiment association1

Glen H. Curtiss (left), director of experriments; John A.D. McCurdy, treasurer; Alexander Graham Bell, chairman;

Frederick W. Baldwin, chief engineer; and Thomas Selfridge, secretary of the Aerial Experiment Associatioin

The Aerial Experiment Association

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

ailerons
Ailerons
  • An aileron is a small flap on the wing for controlling turns
  • Ailerons replaced the Wright brothers’ wing-warping technique
  • The aileron was a more effective means to move an aircraft left or right
  • It also provided lateral balance
  • The association introduced ailerons to America but the idea originated in England

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

first seaplane
First Seaplane
  • Members of the group also built and flew the country’s first seaplane
  • Curtiss would later win the first government contract with the US Navy for seaplanes

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of the US Navy

curtiss s fame grows
Curtiss’s Fame Grows
  • He won awards for distance and speed (the Scientific American trophy and an award at the Rheims Air Meet in France)
  • Curtiss opened a flight school in 1910, the same year the Wright brothers opened their school
  • Curtiss’s effect on aviation can still be felt today

Courtesy of Bettman/Corbis

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

louis bl riot
Louis Blériot
  • French pilot Louis Blériot was the first man to cross the English Channel in a heavier-than-air craft
  • Although Blériot encountered problems—he got lost and his engine overheated—he managed to land safely
  • The flight took 37 minutes

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

bl riot xi
Blériot XI
  • Blériot built and flew the first powered monoplane

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

names and anatomy of period aircraft
Names and Anatomy of Period Aircraft
  • Frenchman Robert Esnault-Pelterie was the first to fully enclose the fuselage and use ailerons
  • A fuselageis the body of an airplane containing the crew and passengers (or cargo)
  • Enclosed cabins protected pilots and passengers from the wind and rain

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

multiengine planes
Multiengine Planes
  • English brothers Eustace, Howard, and Oswald Short experimented with adding engines to their aircraft
  • A multiengine planeisa plane with more than one engine
  • Two (or more) engines upped an aircraft’s power, reliability, and safety

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

the triple twin
The Triple Twin
  • The Short brothers built the Triple Twin, a two-engine, three-propeller aircraft, in 1911
  • They placed one engine in front of the cockpit—a space inside the fuselage where the crew sits
  • They mounted the second engine behind the cockpit

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

le grand
Le Grand
  • Russian pilot Igor Sikorsky designed a four-engine aircraft called Le Grand
  • He flew it on 13 May 1913
  • He used four 100-horsepower engines to lift the 92-foot-wingspan airplane

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute

rotary engines
Rotary Engines
  • The earliest engines were relatively heavy and inefficient
  • One reason was that these early engines used water as a coolant
  • Brothers Laurent and Gustav Seguin of France set out to reduce the motor weight
  • Their solution? Rotary engines

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

rotary engines1
Rotary Engines
  • Rotary engines used circulating air, rather than water, as a coolant
  • The Seguins placed the engine’s cylinders in a radial, or round, pattern
  • They fitted each cylinder with a fin to draw out the heat as the plane flew
  • With these changes, engines became more efficient and their weight dropped

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

helicopters
Helicopters
  • Helicopters are different from other aircraft in two important ways:
    • First, they don’t have fixed wings—they have rotating wings
    • Second, they take off and land vertically

Courtesy of Branger/Getty Images

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

helicopters1
Helicopters
  • The wings of helicopters, like those of other aircraft, must be in constant motion
  • Helicopters have rotors—another name for propellers
  • Rotors are made up of blades, each of which acts as a wing, and as the blades rotate, they lift the helicopter
  • Helicopters are also known as rotary-wing aircraft

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

manned helicopters
Manned Helicopters
  • In 1842 W. H. Phillips got a model helicopter with a steam engine into the air
  • In 1907 Frenchman Louis Bréguet flew one, as did his countryman Paul Cornu
  • In 1909 Americans Emile and Henry Berliner also built and piloted a helicopter
  • All these men faced one common problem: helicopters are difficult to balance
  • No one would find a solution for 30 years

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

american aviation pioneers
American Aviation Pioneers
  • While some aircraft pioneers were achieving fame as inventors, others were breaking barriers as pilots
  • Those barriers ranged from distance to altitude to gender and race
  • The early 20th century was a time when all kinds of records could be broken

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

the vin fiz flyer
The Vin Fiz Flyer
  • Could Calbraith Perry Rodgers fly across the United States in 30 days? That was his goal in 1911
  • Newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst was offering a $50,000 prize
  • Rodgers asked soft drink manufacturer Vin Fiz if it would provide financial support for his flight in exchange for nationwide publicity

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

the vin fiz flyer1
The Vin Fiz Flyer
  • Rodgers took off on 17 September 1911 from Sheepshead Bay on New York’s Long Island
  • The plane needed countless repairs and made many stops along the way
  • It took 49 days—Rodgers didn’t win the award because the flight took too long—but he made history

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

the vin fiz flyer2
The Vin Fiz Flyer

Rodgers had earned a place in aviation history—he made the first airplane crossing of the US from coast to coast

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Taken from centennialofflight.gov

first enlisted pilot gets his wings
First Enlisted Pilot Gets His Wings
  • PFC Vernon Burge was the first enlisted man to become a pilot
  • The US Army Signal Corps’ Aeronautical Division had a general rule that only officers could be pilots
  • Enlisted men trained as mechanics
  • Burge was one of eight enlisted men who joined the division in 1907

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

first enlisted pilot gets his wings1
First Enlisted Pilot Gets His Wings
  • Burge helped build a landing system for 1st Lt Benjamin Foulois’ airplane
  • During this time, Burge learned as much as he could about airplanes
  • He became a pilot in 1912
  • It wasn’t until 18 July 1914 that the US House of Representatives passed a bill that authorized enlisted men to fly
  • It also gave official status to the Army’s aviation arm

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

bessie coleman
Bessie Coleman
  • Bessie Coleman faced two obstacles to becoming a pilot—her race and her gender; she overcame both
  • In 1921 Coleman became the first black woman to get a pilot’s license
  • She had to go to France for training because no flight school in the United States would accept her
  • She died in an airplane crash only four years after getting her license

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

blanche stuart scott
Blanche Stuart Scott
  • Scott was Glenn Curtiss’s only female student in 1910
  • Curtiss worried about this—if Scott crashed, he feared he’d be blamed for putting a woman in harm’s way
  • So Curtiss did what he could to keep Scott from being able to take off

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

blanche stuart scott1
Blanche Stuart Scott
  • Nonetheless, Scott managed to fly one of Curtiss’s planes one day
  • Scott had become the first American woman to solo in a fixed-wing airplane

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of Hill Air Force Museum

bessica medlar raiche
Bessica Medlar Raiche
  • Some aviation historians think Bessica Medlar Raiche was really the first woman to go solo
  • She made that flight on 13 October 1910
  • Raiche never got a license, but flying excited her
  • She and her husband, François, formed a lightweight airplane company called the French-American Aeroplane Company

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

harriet quimby
Harriet Quimby
  • In 1911, Quimby became the first American woman to earn her pilot’s license
  • She was also the first woman to fly at night (1911) and to pilot across the English Channel (1912)
  • She broke a fashion barrier, too, by designing and wearing a jumpsuit

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

harriet quimby1
Harriet Quimby
  • Quimby entered the Boston Air Meet in 1912
  • She and her passenger took off over Boston Harbor in hopes of making a record 58 mph flight over a body of water
  • At 5,000 feet, the plane flipped and nosed downward
  • Quimby and Willard fell from the plane and plunged into the waters—both perished

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

matilde moisant
Matilde Moisant
  • On 13 April 1911, Moisant became the second woman in America to get a pilot’s license
  • She won the Rodman Wanamaker Trophy for flying at an attitude of 2,500 feet
  • She also a court to acknowledge it was legal to fly on Sundays
  • Her brother John Moisant, also a pilot, had died in a crash in 1910
  • His death deeply affected her and on 13 April 1912, she said she’d make her last flight the next day

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

julia clark
Julia Clark
  • On 19 May 1912, Julia Clark was the third American woman to gain her pilot’s license
  • Sadly, she was also the first woman pilot to die in a crash
  • She learned to fly at the Curtiss Flying School at North Island in San Diego
  • After soloing in a Curtiss plane, she joined an exhibition group
  • She took a text flight on 17 June 1912; she hit a tree limb, crashed, and died

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

katherine and marjorie stinson
Katherine and Marjorie Stinson
  • Katherine Stinson earned her pilot’s license on 24 July 1912
  • She was the fourth American woman to do so, and at age 16, she was also the youngest
  • She would eventually become one of the most successful women in aviation
  • Her younger sister, Marjorie, graduated from the Wright Flying School in August 1914
  • When WWI began, the sisters opened a school to train Americans and Canadians as pilots for the war

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

review
Review
  • The first powered dirigible in America was equipped with a Glenn Curtiss engine
  • Louis Blériot was the first man to build and fly a powered monoplane
  • A multiengine plane had greater power, reliability, and safety than a single-engine plane
  • Laurent and Gustav Seguin of France invented rotary engines that used circulating air rather than water

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

review1
Review
  • Calbraith Perry Rodgers made the first airplane crossing of the United States from coast to coast
  • PFC Vernon Burge was the first enlisted man to become a pilot
  • Bessie Coleman became the first black woman to get a pilot’s license

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

review2
Review
  • Blanche Stuart Scott was the first American woman to solo in a fixed-wing airplane
  • Harriet Quimby was the first American woman to earn her pilot’s license
  • Bessica Medlar Raiche, Matilde Moisant, Julia Clark, and Katherine and Marjorie Stinson were also famous female aviators of the period

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

summary
Summary
  • Key individuals involved in early aircraft development
  • The names and anatomy of period aircraft
  • The significance of other American pioneers in aviation following the Wright brothers

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

slide41
Next….
  • Done—developing aircraft
  • Next—air power in World War I

Courtesy of the EAA/Jim Koepnick

Chapter 2, Lesson 2

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