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Literary and Rhetorical Devices 1-10. Oral Communications Diff. Antimetabole. The same words and two independent clauses but in reversed or changed order. “Repetition of certain words in reverse order.” EXAMPLE: “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”. Antithesis.

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literary and rhetorical devices 1 10

Literary and Rhetorical Devices 1-10

Oral Communications Diff.

antimetabole
Antimetabole
  • The same words and two independent clauses but in reversed or changed order.
  • “Repetition of certain words in reverse order.”
  • EXAMPLE: “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”
antithesis
Antithesis
  • The rhetorical contrast of ideas by means of parallel arrangements of words, clauses, or sentences; the second stage of a dialectic process.
  • “The juxtaposition of sharply contrasting words or phrases.”
  • EXAMPLE: “Action, not words.” OR “When pigs fly.” OR “When hell freezes over.”
gradualism
Gradualism
  • Passing on to the strongest word after advancing through milder ones.
  • “Going through milder words to get to the strongest word at the end of the sentence.”
  • EXAMPLE: “The continuance of anger is hatred; the continuance of hatred turns to malice.”
oxymoron
Oxymoron
  • When two words that have the opposite meaning of each other are put together in one sentence.
  • “A contradiction of words.”
  • EXAMPLE: “Alone together.” OR “Pretty ugly.” OR “Jumbo shrimp.”
anadiplosis
Anadiplosis
  • Repetition of the last word in one line or clause to begin the next.
  • “The same word in a sentence and it begins the next sentence. You repeat the last word or phrase of the sentence in the beginning of the next.”
  • EXAMPLE: “To beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.” OR “Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.”
anaphora
Anaphora
  • The repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses, sentences, or clauses.
  • “The same word being repeated at the beginning of two or more sentences in a row.”
  • EXAMPLE: “He laughed at you. He laughed at me. He laughed at us all.”
antonomasia
Antonomasia
  • Using a word in substitution for an original word. (Slang.)
  • “Substituting a descriptive word for a proper name. (Nickname.)”
  • EXAMPLE: “Strawberry.” OR “CAT Nyberg.” OR “Mr. Right.”
apostrophe
Apostrophe
  • The direct address of some abstract quality or nonexistent person.
  • EXAMPLE: “Hello, Darkness, my old friend. I’ve come to talk with you again.” OR “Blue moon, you saw me standing alone, without a dream in a my heart, without a love of my own.” (Songs use this a lot.)
asyndeton
Asyndeton
  • A scheme where conjunctions are omitted from a series of related causes.
  • “A list of words or phrases as examples.”
  • EXAMPLE: “I came. I saw. I conquered. OR “I like Jewish, French, and wheat bread.”
climax
Climax
  • A figure of speech in which a series is in a certain order.
  • “Progression from lesser to a greater degree of quality or quantity.”
  • EXAMPLE: “I began by sitting in a chair, then driving a car, then BAM! I was at the controls of a spaceship.”