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DeWitt Perry Middle School

DeWitt Perry Middle School

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DeWitt Perry Middle School

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  1. DeWitt Perry Middle School

  2. What is Make Your Day? Make Your Day is a school-wide citizenship and discipline program that allows teachers to teach and students to learn.

  3. Choices • YOU must choose to take part in the learning environment in your classes. • You make decisions regarding your behavior choices – not your teachers! • Along with that choice comes responsibility- you will be held accountable for your choices. • Students who choose not to participate are given the opportunity to do so in a way that does not affect the learning of others.

  4. The Rule No one has the right to interfere with the learning, safety, or well-being of others. This rule is ours – We own it!

  5. Consequencesvs.Punishment

  6. Consequences vs. Punishment • Who would like to be perfect? • Is it reasonable to expect anyone to be perfect? • What is a mistake? • A mistake is an opportunity to learn and grow • Does making a mistake make you “bad”?

  7. Consequences vs. Punishment • What is a punishment? • a set of penalties used to punish infractions of rules • imposing something unpleasant on a person, usually in response to disobedience or defiance • harsh or severe treatment, often perceived as unfair by the person being punished (Pause for discussion)

  8. Consequences vs. Punishment • What is a consequence? • a result of actions or choices that is fair, predictable, and/or logical • the outcome of an event or choice, especially as relative to an individual • a known set of conditions that will exist following a action or choice (Pause for discussion)

  9. Consequences vs. Punishment • If a teacher comes to you privately and allows you to take time away from the learning environment to think about your behavior choices and how you can make a positive impact on your learning, is that a consequence or a punishment?

  10. Why is it a consequence? • It is PRIVATE – it is YOUR CHOICE – it preserves your dignity • It is FAIR – it gives you time to reflect, cool down, or get yourself under control – WITHOUT interfering with others • It is PREDICTABLE – we only have one rule, and the consequences for not following that rule are clearly stated

  11. What are the consequences if I choose to violate our Rule? You are choosing STEPS

  12. What are Steps? • Steps are a neutral place, away from the learning environment, where students may choose to go to reflect over the behavior they have chosen, cool down, or get themselves under control. • What are some behaviors that students exhibit that may cause them choose Steps? (Pause to discuss student responses)

  13. Steps • Some examples of behaviors that students exhibit that may cause them to choose Steps: • Talking out • Tapping the desk or making noise • Talking while the teacher is talking • Taking others’ property • Throwing things • Insubordination

  14. Steps • Some examples of behaviors that are not Step issues: • Messy work • Not doing your work in class • Not having your materials or homework • These behaviors do not violate our Rule. • These are examples of Points issues which will be discussed later.

  15. What do Steps look like?

  16. Step 1 – Student moves to an area in the room and sits in a chair, facing away from the learning environment • Step 2 – Student stands up, still facing away from the learning environment • Step 3 – Student remains standing, facing away from the learning environment, and focuses on our Rule • Step 4 – Student is removed from the classroom • Step 5 – Student is removed from school (suspended)

  17. Step 1 • If a student chooses Step 1, this means that he or shehas chosen a behavior that interferes with the learning, safety, or well-being of others. • The teacher will walk over to the student and state, “Step 1, {exact behavior}.” • The teacher will then walk away. What does the student do? • The student will quietly move to an area of the room and sit down, facing away from the learning environment, to reflect on their behavior choice and how they plan to correct their behavior.

  18. Step 1 • After some time has passed, the teacher will go to the student and privately ask, “How did you choose Step 1?” • The student answers by stating what behavior caused them to choose Step 1. • If the student correctly states the behavior, indicating that they have taken responsibility, the teacher will ask, “Do you need more time?”

  19. Step 1 • If the student answers “no” (indicating that they do not need more time) the teacher says “You may return to class.” • This is called an Exit Conference

  20. Step 1 • If the student answers “yes” (indicating that they DO need more time) the teacher will walk away, and return at a later time for another Exit Conference • Keep in mind that the teacher’s PRIMARY responsibility is to TEACH, and that it may be some time before the teacher can return for the Exit Conference

  21. Step 2 • In order to choose Step 2, the student has chosen Step 1 and continues to violate our Rule. • The teacher will walk over to the student and state, “Step 2, {exact behavior}.” • In Step 2, the student will stand up, still facing away from the learning environment. • The student will continue to reflect on their behavior choices and how they plan to correct their behavior.

  22. Step 2 • After some time has passed, the teacher will go to the student and privately ask, “How did you choose Step 2?” • The student answers by stating what behavior caused them to choose Step 2. • If the student correctly states the behavior, indicating that they have taken responsibility, the teacher will ask, “Do you need more time on Step 2?”

  23. Step 2 • If the student answers “no” (indicating that they do not need more time) the teacher says “You may return to Step 1.” • After some time has passed on Step 1, the teacher will return and conduct an Exit Conference, at which time the student may choose to rejoin the class.

  24. Step 3 • In order to choose Step 3, the student has chosen Step 2 and continues to violate our Rule. • The teacher will walk over to the student and state, “You have now chosen Step 3 for {exact behavior}. You have a choice to make. Your choice is to focus your attention on our Rule or you may chooseStep 4, which is calling your parents to come to school for a conference. Which do you prefer?”

  25. Step 3 • At this point, the student must make a choice. • If the choice is Step 3, the student will remain standing, facing away from the learning environment, and reflect on the Rule. • The teacher will give the student a copy of our Rule to focus on while they continue to reflect on their behavior choices and how to correct them. • While in Step 3, the student should make a conscious effort to focus on our Rule.

  26. Step 3 • After some time has passed, the teacher will go to the student and privately ask, “How did you choose Step 3?” • The student answers by stating what behavior caused them to choose Step 3. • If the student correctly states the behavior, indicating that they have taken responsibility, the teacher will ask, “Do you need more time on Step 3?”

  27. Step 3 • If the student answers “no” (indicating that they do not need more time) the teacher says “You may return to Step 2.” • After some time has passed, the teacher will go to the student and privately ask, “How did you choose Step 2?” • The student answers by stating what behavior caused them to choose Step 2. • If the student correctly states the behavior, indicating that they have taken responsibility, the teacher will ask, “Do you need more time on Step 2?”

  28. Step 3 • If the student answers “no” (indicating that they do not need more time) the teacher says “You may return to Step 1.” • After some time has passed on Step 1, the teacher will return and conduct an Exit Conference, at which time the student may choose to rejoin the class.

  29. Step 1 – Student sits in a chair, facing away from the learning environment • Step 2 – Student stands up, still facing away from the learning environment • Step 3 – Student remains standing, facing away from the learning environment, and focuses on The Rule (Pause to Role Play students choosing and going to Steps)

  30. Step 4 • If the student choosesStep 4, the teacher will state, “You have chosen Step 4 for {exact behavior}. You will now go to Student Services to contact your parents for a conference.” • The teacher will send the student to Student Services to contact their parent. • The student may not return to their regular classes until a parent conference has been held.

  31. Step 4 • After the parent is contacted, the student will be directed to another classroom (buddy room) and remain on Step 4 in that classroom until their parent arrives. • It is the expectation of the buddy room teacher that the student who has chosenStep 4 will not interfere with that class. • If the student chooses to interfere while waiting for the conference, they are choosing Step 5.

  32. Step 4 • When the parent arrives, the teacher will have a conference with them and their student outside of the classroom. • For students who are in the teacher’s classroom, the teacher will state, “Students, I will be involved in a Step 4 conference. Please continue working.” • The students remaining in the classroom are expected to be working.

  33. Step 4 • Outside of the classroom, the teacher and parent will discuss the behaviors that the student chose to get to Step 4. • The teacher, the parent, and the student will then conference. • During the conference the student is expected to: • take responsibility for their behavior, • state how they will correct their behavior, and • express a desire to return to class. • The parent then determines whether the student is ready to return to class.

  34. Steps Reminders • It is your choice to go to, and progressthrough, Steps (no one can “send” you to Steps) • What goes up must come down… (If you choose to escalate from Step 1 to Step 2, you must de-escalate back through Step 1 before returning to class) • Except in certain extreme circumstances, Steps are not “skipped”*

  35. Automatic Step 4 • For certain extreme or dangerous behaviors, students may qualify for an Automatic Step 4: • Leaving Steps without an Exit Conference • Non-violent Gang Activity • Serious or Dangerous Horseplay • shoving, pushing, hitting, kicking, tripping, slapping, knuckle games, “licks”, “lashes”, “necks”, flicking, thumping, etc. In other words… please keep your hands to yourself! • Shadowing another student on Step 4

  36. Step 5 • Continuing to interfere with learning while in a buddy room • Fighting OF ANY KIND • This may include verbal confrontations! • Drug & alcohol related offenses • Weapons • Gang related offenses • Any behavior labeled by administration as serious misconduct as defined by the CFBISD code of conduct

  37. Shadowing and Opting Out

  38. What is Shadowing? • When another student responds to or interacts in any manner with a student who has chosen Steps, they have chosen to "shadow" or follow their fellow student through the Steps • For example, if a student has chosen Step 3 and you shadow that student, you have also chosenStep 3! • Laughing at, pointing at, commenting on, talking to, talking about, or drawing attention to others who have chosen Steps is Shadowing.

  39. Opting Out • Occasionally, students may choose to “opt out” and go to Step 1without violating our Rule - they may just need time away from the learning environment – not because of any Rule violation or behavior issue. • Students should be accommodated by the teacher and recognized for taking responsibility for their behavior. • Regular rules for Steps apply. • Teacher will ask students periodically if they are ready to return to the learning environment.Students do not tell the teacher when they are ready…

  40. POINTS

  41. The 5 W’s of Points WHO WHAT WHEN WHY HOW

  42. Who earns points?

  43. What are Points? • Points measure success in the Make Your Day program. • You assign your own points according to your self-assessment of how well you met classroom expectations. • If you follow expectations you earn points. • This includes School-wide expectations as well as specific expectations in each of your classes

  44. When do you earn Points? • All day long! This includes: • Before School • During School • Each class period • Passing period • Lunch • Advisory/SSR • After School

  45. Why do you earn Points? • So you can… • do your personal best. • feel a sense of accomplishment • realize when you have had a good or bad day • A good day can be repeated and also improved upon • A bad day can be evaluated as to what went wrong to help think of ways to prevent it from repeating itself

  46. How do you earn Points? • By doing what is expected and by doing your best. • Being on time for school and classes • Having all supplies and materials for each and every class • Pen/pencil • Paper • Homework or class assignment • Agenda • Participating in class discussions and activities

  47. Earning Points • Some examples of ways you could earn points: • Following directions to the best of your ability • Having all necessary supplies and materials • Being on time to school and to class • Participating in class discussion and activities • Trying your best on an assignment or activity, even if you don’t succeed • Contributing in a positive way to the learning environment of your class (Pause to discuss other ways to earn points)

  48. Points • Points are taken each day in each class, and are totaled every Friday • You can earn up to 50 points each class period • Total possible points for each class is 250 for the week. • If there are less than 5 days of school in a week, it is assumed that you earnedfull points on the days school was not in session • If you are absent, it is assumed that you earnedfull points for the days you were not at school

  49. Points • Some examples of ways you would notearn points: • Not having needed supplies or materials • Pencil, paper, assignments, etc. • Not having or not wearing your ID • Not working • Not participating • Talking out • Chewing gum (Pause to discuss other ways you would NOT earn points)

  50. How do we “do” Points? • In the last few minutes of every class all names (including the teacher) are called for point values • Teacher and students reflect on their effort and assign their own points, along with the reason for their points • When your name is called, you should respond as follows…