getting your module started in your classroom n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Getting your Module Started in your Classroom PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Getting your Module Started in your Classroom

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 20
gordon

Getting your Module Started in your Classroom - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

120 Views
Download Presentation
Getting your Module Started in your Classroom
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Getting your Module Started in your Classroom

  2. Check on Tech • Audio Wizard • Elluminate tools • Hand raise • Microphone • Smiley face • Checkmark • Chat box IU 13 LDC Webinar

  3. Virtual Meeting Norms Please… • contribute to the conversation by using the chat window during the presentation. • raise your hand to indicate that you’d like to use the microphone when it is time for questions. • release the microphone when you are finished. • use the door to indicate that you are away from your computer if you need to step out. IU 13 LDC Webinar

  4. Goals for This Afternoon… • Review instructional considerations for teachers implementing LDC for the first time. • Introduce tips, including the use of a writer’s notebook as a guided way to lead students through the module to successful completion of the task. IU 13 LDC Webinar

  5. Getting Started… • Check your task one more time- is it good to go? • How much support will students need to successfully complete the task? • How will students receive feedback at various stages of the process?  • How will students demonstrate that they clearly understand what the task is asking them to do prior to writing? • How will reading be scaffoldedfor my students? • What note-taking method will students use, and does that method align with the writing task? • How will students make the transition from the reading to the writing? IU 13 LDC Webinar

  6. Instructional Considerations • Check your task one more time- is it good to go? Challenging but manageable for your first attempt? Task 23 Template (Informational or Explanatory/Comparison L1, L2, L3):  What adaptations do crocodiles have that have allowed them to survive for so long?  After reading a variety of informational texts, write an essay that compares ancient and modern crocodiles. L2 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. L3 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. http://www.pdesas.org/module/content/resources/20205/view.ashx Task 11B (Informational or Explanatory/Definition L1, L2):  After researching the provided resources on organ transplantation, write an essay that defines organ transplantation, explains reasons for requiring a transplantation, and explores medical issues involved with this process.   Support the discussion with evidence from the research.  L2 What implications can you draw? http://www.pdesas.org/module/content/resources/20259/view.ashx IU 13 LDC Webinar

  7. Instructional Considerations • How much support will students need to successfully complete the task?Review the skills list with your students in mind. • What parts of the process can be completed independently (during or outside of class)? • What parts of the process represent new learning or substantial challenge and warrant direct instruction or guided practice during class? • Do students have the resources they need? How might you structure the process? • Can you enlist the support or collaborate with other teachers who also work with your students? Examples— “Flip” aspects of instruction, Project Planning tools, Writer’s Notebooks IU 13 LDC Webinar

  8. Flip It! • You could flip class time and homework- this can help you accomplish more in less time and provide extra support. Gathering Evidence/Citing Sources http://learnzillion.com/lessons/1469-gather-evidence-and-cite-sources History https://flippedlearning.eduvision.tv/ajax/../Default.aspx?q=N1VVbOR2eYOoKzuYuAktvA%253d%253d#.UHXetv1ytDM.email Chemistry https://flippedlearning.eduvision.tv/ajax/../Default.aspx?q=X3Y5NcZVhaBe9qL3mhcmkQ%253d%253d#.UHXhU4oMTXs.email Tip: Most teachers who assign video tutorials/ screencasts require that students take notes and bring them to class for discussion. See webinar workspace for examples For more on flipping: http://flippedlearning1.wordpress.com/ IU 13 LDC Webinar

  9. Project Planning • Help students pace their work. Provide clear check points. Civil War Museum Guide Module— Kady Blass IU 13 LDC Webinar

  10. British Industrial Revolutionwww.literacydesigncollaborative.org IU 13 LDC Webinar

  11. The Writer’s Notebook • Background Information • kid-friendly version from task sheet • Teaching Task • Quick Write (see Cryobiology module) • In a quick write, write your first reaction to the task prompt listed above. What do you think the task is asking you to do? • What materials do you need? • Note-taker (see Zoos module) • Student Model of Argumentative Writing • Transition from Reading to Writing • Outline (see O’ Captain module) • Editing Checklist (see O’ Captain module) • Guidelines for Citing Evidence (see Why Cite?Webinar resources) • both parenthetical citations and works cited or bibliography Example: Economic Systems IU 13 LDC Webinar

  12. Feedback • How will students receive feedback at various stages of the process?  • Annotated texts • Notes checks • Exit slips • Collect the first paragraph of writing • Peer or Teacher Conferences • “Redo” policy? • Tech tools 11/29/12 – Implementing Your LDC Module: Writing- Providing Feedback IU 13 LDC Webinar

  13. Make the Task Visible • How will students demonstrate that they clearly understand what the task is asking them to do prior to writing? • Post the task in your classroom at the beginning of the unit of study. • Provide the task on a handout or note-taking guide for students. • Collaboratively read the task and highlight key words or phrases. • Ask students to brainstorm and list what they need to do be successful on this task/assignment. • Revisit the list as you progress through the implementation of the task. IU 13 LDC Webinar

  14. Help Students “See” What Success Looks Like • Make sure students know how they will be assessed. • Share the rubric by using a student paper and “marking up” what the student did that “met expectations.” Color code or use language of rubric. • Help students translate the rubric in their own words. IU 13 LDC Webinar

  15. Instructional Considerations • How will reading be scaffoldedfor my students? • Read together? Read in groups? Read independently? • Read for homework to prepare for class activity/discussion: • Jigsaw • Text rendering (see webinar resources) • Pinwheel Discussionshttps://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/high-school-literature-lesson-plan • Mingle • Create a student reader/guide • Over Here: America's Home Front During World War I Module (Price & Schmid)---Module Creator 1/17/13 – Implementing Your LDC Module: Helping Students Read and Analyze Complex Text IU 13 LDC Webinar

  16. Instructional Considerations • What note-taking method will students use, and does that method align with the writing task? • Organize both side of the argument • Collect and organize relevant info • Aid in citing sources and avoiding plagarism (See webinar resources) IU 13 LDC Webinar

  17. Organize the Writing Process • Consider providing a two column note-taking guide or table to make it easier for students to “see” both sides of the argument. • Make sure students have a way to keep track of where they got their information on their notes. IU 13 LDC Webinar

  18. Instructional Considerations • How will students make the transition from the reading to the writing? • Opportunities to talk and share ideas • Socratic Seminar • Value Line • 4 Corners or Philosophical Chairs https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/reading-like-a-historian-taking-positions?fd=1 • Use of notes, outlines and organizers 1/31/13 – Paideia/Socratic Seminar and LDC 2/21/13 – Engagement Techniques and LDC IU 13 LDC Webinar

  19. Upcoming Webinars October • 10/25/12 – Implementing Your LDC Module: Writing Tips and Techniques November • 11/8/12 – Implementing Your LDC Module: Helping Students Organize an Argumentative Essay Can’t wait?http://elluminate.iu13.org/play_recording.html?recordingId=1261169150729_1349375607031 • 11/29/12 – Implementing Your LDC Module: Writing- Providing Feedback IU 13 LDC Webinar

  20. Contact Us! Barbara Smith- LDC Site Lead Email: barbaraa_smith@iu13.org Phone: (717) 606-1374 Cell Phone: (717) 644-1144 Skype: barbaraa_smith_iu Twitter: @BarbSmith2 Kelly Galbraith- LDC Consultant Email: kelly_galbraith@iu13.org Phone: (717) 606-1667 Cell Phone: (717) 419-4069 Skype: kelly.galbraith.iu Twitter: @galbraith_kelly Marisa Stoner-LDC Program Assistant Email: marisa_stoner@iu13.org Phone: (717) 606-1939 Tweet: @LDCIU13 IU 13 LDC Webinar