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Next Gen CRM

Next Gen CRM

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Next Gen CRM

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Next Gen CRM Dick Wolf September, 2012

  2. Command Skills Role Model Performance

  3. Command Skills Briefings Outlines Plans & Differences Allocates Tasks Seeks Input Checks Understanding Situational Awareness Thorough Pre-Flight Preparation Stays Ahead & Updates Plans Makes Contingency Plans Keeps a Broad Perspective Professional Style Relaxed and Professional Tone Aspires to High Performance Conscientious and Flexible Self-Aware and Seeks Feedback Teamwork Balances Rank Authority Flexible & Shows Respect Actively Monitors & Supports Thinks Independently Workload Recognizes a High Workload Takes or Makes Time Deals With Overload & Prioritizes Avoids Distractions & Distracting Aircraft Handling Safe/Efficient/Comfortable Automatic/Manual Flight Non-Normals/Emergencies Threat & Error Management Communication Shares Information & Ideas Actively Listens Assertive When Required Admits Mistakes & Doubts Decisions Identifies Problems & Issues Involves Others If Needed Evaluates the Outcome Uses Structure In New Situations Applied Knowledge Technical and Operational Use of Checklists SOP’s/Policies Commercial/Customer Awareness

  4. Command Skills

  5. Command Skills Teaching Briefing Skills to Enhance Situational Awareness

  6. Command Skills Example FRA Brief P1: I’m looking at Chart 13-1 Apr 07 VOR 07L date April 07. MSA is 4300’ – expecting radar from TAUNUS to pick up the inbound course 072 FFM. Descent begins at 15.5 DME – we have DME height checks down to minima of 830 + 50 and 1200m RVR required. Missed approach is climb straight ahead to 10 DME or 5000’ and left turn back to TAUNUS VOR. We know the runway is long, good lighting and we can take a high speed turn. For nav we’ll have the VOR and the NDBs. Any questions? P2: No questions

  7. Command Skills Disturbing Facts 50% of accidents occur on Approach and Landing 75% of those are on NPA Most occur on the centre-line Most are following a 3 degree slope (...no problem...)

  8. Command Skills Disturbing Facts

  9. Command Skills Disturbing Facts

  10. Command Skills Disturbing Facts • 50% of accidents occur on Approach and Landing • 75% of those are on NPA • Most occur on the centre-line • Most are following a 3 degree slope • Most are un-briefed or briefed like an ILS!!

  11. Command Skills A Question • What are the differences between an ILS and a NPA? • Different Modes • High workload • More risk • Maybe offset • Maybe off centerline when we break cloud – visual maneuver required • Pilot interprets tracking • Pilot interprets glidepath – more communication required between pilots • Significance of DME tuning / position • Minima different (significance of visibility) • Possibly non radar environment / less approach lighting • Different configurations • Increase likelihood of GA / Diversion • 500’ GPWS call gets in the way of minima calls - causing confusion • Navaid selection

  12. Command Skills Conclusions When it comes to briefings in order to enhance the awareness of our situation: • What can we consider as ‘Standard’? • What are the Differences? • What is the Plan?

  13. Command Skills

  14. Command Skills Workload Practical Pilot Skills

  15. Performance Arousal Command Skills

  16. Command Skills Key Question for Pilots: “What does overload look like?” “Can it be measured?”

  17. PILOT WORKLOAD Command Skills Recognizing Overload “What should the checklist say?” “Why haven’t we written one?”

  18. Command Skills Key Messages – Pilot Expressions “Hang on a minute”

  19. Command Skills Situational Awareness

  20. Command Skills Previous CRM Training Problem: • 80% of accidents involve a loss of SA Solution? • “Make sure you don’t lose it!” • Definitions • ‘The accurate perception of the factors and conditions that affect an aircraft and its flight’ • ‘Where we are in space and time and what is going on around us’

  21. Command Skills Observing SA Skills • How to ascertain (and maintain) SA level

  22. Command Skills Research Findings… What good pilots do: • Project ahead / Anticipate / Contingency plan • Routinely demonstrate self-checking • Briefings, Briefings, Briefing Therefore, they . . . • Are aware of their workload • Know when workload is high • Know when SA is low

  23. Command Skills ‘Situational Awareness, like money, is hard to get – but is easy to lose’

  24. Command Skills Briefings Outlines Plans & Differences Allocates Tasks Seeks Input Checks Understanding Situational Awareness Thorough Pre-Flight Preparation Stays Ahead & Updates Plans Makes Contingency Plans Keeps a Broad Perspective Professional Style Relaxed and Professional Tone Aspires to High Performance Conscientious and Flexible Self-Aware and Seeks Feedback Teamwork Balances Rank Authority Flexible & Shows Respect Actively Monitors & Supports Thinks Independently Workload Recognizes a High Workload Takes or Makes Time Deals With Overload & Prioritizes Avoids Distractions & Distracting Aircraft Handling Safe/Efficient/Comfortable Automatic/Manual Flight Non-Normals/Emergencies Threat & Error Management Communication Shares Information & Ideas Actively Listens Assertive When Required Admits Mistakes & Doubts Decisions Identifies Problems & Issues Involves Others If Needed Evaluates the Outcome Uses Structure In New Situations Applied Knowledge Technical and Operational Use of Checklists SOP’s/Policies Commercial/Customer Awareness