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Canadian Approach to On-farm Food Safety

Canadian Approach to On-farm Food Safety

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Canadian Approach to On-farm Food Safety

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  1. Canadian Approach to On-farm Food Safety Its Evolution, Current Success & Future Challenges International Federation of Agricultural Producers 37th World Farmer's Congress 60 years of empowering farmers Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006 Albert Chambers, Consultant Canadian On-Farm Food Safety Working Group IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  2. Presentation Outline • Why on-farm food safety • Basic elements of the Canadian approach • Developing a commodity-specific program • Official Recognition • Collaborative Initiatives • Current Status • Future Challenges • Conclusion IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  3. Why On-farm Food Safety? • Four major drivers • Consumer concerns • Government initiatives • Customer demands • Competitor’s actions IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  4. Canadian Producers’ Options • Do nothing • Wait for governments to regulate • Let the downstream food industry dictate • Be proactive • 1990/95 – various commodity based initiatives • 1996 - national consensus achieved • 1997 - producers & government establish Canadian On-Farm Food Safety Program IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  5. Producer Objectives for On-Farm Food Safety Programs • Producer-led, national & accessible • Commodity-specific programs • HACCP-based & auditable • Consistent, modular & expandable • Recognized in Canada • Internationally accepted • Affordable IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  6. Creating an On-Farm Food Safety Program • Government & Producer cost shared (some recognition of “public benefit”) • Four Phase Process • Phase 1 - National Strategy • Phase 2 – Program Development • Phase 3 – Implementation • Phase 4 – Recognition IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  7. Phase 2 – Development Process • Adopt Codex HACCP Principles & approach • Assemble HACCP team (producers, experts & stakeholders) • Conduct hazard analysis • Create the tools farmers need • On-going Communications with stakeholders • Pilot Projects • Generic GPP’s & CPP’s & Record Keeping requirements • Pre-assessment guides & Audit checklists • Training materials (Producers & Auditors) IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  8. Phase 2 – Results • Commodity-specific Programs that are: • Rigorous & Technically Sound • HACCP-based & science-based • Designed with up & downstream input • Subject to peer & expert reviews • Transparent & open to information sharing (successes & failures) • “Producer friendly”, practical & consistent one to another • Auditable IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  9. HACCP-based On-Farm Programs • 29 Commodity-specific programs covering 99% of primary production • Livestock (8) - hogs, cattle, dairy, sheep, bison, cervids (deer/elk), veal & goats • Poultry (5) - hatching eggs, hatcheries, table eggs, chickens & turkeys • Horticulture (12) - fresh fruits/vegetables*, sprouts, mushrooms & herbs/spices • Grains, oilseeds, pulses & special crops (1) • Honey • Aquaculture (2) – finfish& shellfish *Horticulture subprograms: general, potatoes, bulb & root, leafy vegetables, tree & vine fruit, small fruit, fruiting vegetables, other vegetables, greenhouse production IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  10. Official Recognition • World’s First • Designed by Producers & Government • Based on a Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministerial Agreement (2001) • Consistent with Codex concepts • Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) leadership with Provincial & Territorial Participation • Stepwise Process assesses • Technical Soundness • Administrative Effectiveness IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  11. Essential Program Components On-farm Requirements National Producer Organization Conformity Assessment Governance Resources Auditor Training Program Management Risk Management Official Recognition IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  12. Recognition - Technical Reviews • Part 1- Technical soundness • Rigorous Review of Hazard Analysis & Documents • Face to Face Meeting • Adjustments Requested & Resolved • Letter of Completion Issued by CFIA • Part 2 - Administrative Effectiveness • Considers Program management system & documentation, auditor training materials, conformity assessment system, etc • Face to Face Meeting • Adjustments requested & made • Letter of Non-Objection issued by CFIA IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  13. Recognition – Oversight Requirements • Of the Farm • Meet governments requirements based on their assessment of on-farm risks • Provides what is needed not some “ideal” • Minimum requirement of 8 year certification periods drive down costs with cycles of • Full systems audits • Supplier declaration & submission of self evaluation checklists • FSSSFSSS • Many programs exceed the minimum IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  14. Recognition – Oversight Requirements • Of the Program • Meet government requirements • Internal & 3rd party audits prior to official recognition • Cycle of internal audits & management reviews by NPO with reports to & reviews by CFIA (years 1 to 4) • 3rd party audit & CFIA review prior to decision on continued recognition (year 5) IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  15. COFFS Working Group - Results • Establishing common infrastructure to ensure program sustainability • Negotiation of Official Recognition • National Training Module for Auditors (completed 2002 & to be revised in 2006) • Insurance for On-Farm Auditors (completed) • Templates for Program Management Systems (completed) • Risk Management Planning Guide for NPOs (completed) • Medicated Feeds Module to meet proposed regulations (in progress) • National Certification Body Business Plan (completed) IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  16. Feed mills Grain elevators Trucking Railways Food distribution & storage Fresh produce packers & distributors Bottled Water Ice making Packaging materials Grocery warehouse/ distribution Grocery stores Foodservice (volume feeding) Importers Other HACCP or HACCP-based Industry Programs – Following On-Farm Lead IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  17. Producer Involvement in Supply Chain Initiatives • A lead role for primary producers along with input suppliers, processors, manufacturers, distributors & final marketers in: • Canadian Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education (consumer education) • ATQ, CCIA & CLIA (developing animal ID & traceability initiatives) • CAN-TRACE (developing a national traceability data standard) • Canadian Supply Chain Food Safety Coalition (liaison with governments on policy & regulations) • Canadian stakeholder group on ISO 22000 series of standards (ensuring HACCP-based programs fit) IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  18. Future Challenges • Implementation • 200,000+ farms on one or more programs • Infrastructure • Sustainable & affordable mechanisms • Full acceptance as “public good” • International Recognition • Customers, Governments, ISO 22000, etc • Adaptation & Expansion • Other management systems (environment, animal welfare, etc.) IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  19. Preliminary International Lessons • Farm organization leadership is critical • Foundation based on internationally accepted approaches (e.g. Codex HACCP, ISO, etc) • Generic, national programs, accessible to all sizes of farms • Industry/government partnership & acceptance as “public good” • Supply chain collaboration • Ready when market requires • Drive costs out of the system – use what is needed IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  20. Canadian Approach to Food Safety More Information in French and English on: • Canadian On-Farm Food Safety Working Group • www.onfarmfoodsafety.ca • Canadian Food Safety & Quality Program • www.agr.ca/fd_al_e.phb • CFIA led Official Recognition • www.inspection.gc.ca (under food safety) • Canadian Supply Chain Food Safety Coalition • www.foodsafetycoalition.ca • Canadian Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education • www.canfightbac.org • Canadian Traceability Initiative • www.can-trace.org IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006

  21. Canadian Approach to On-Farm Food Safety • A Producer-led Initiative • A Successful Industry/Government Partnership • A World Leader IFAP – 37th World Congress Seoul, South Korea 19 May 2006