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Universal Design for Learning , Differentiation, RtI Region 4 PD Leads. Graphing Me. Why it Matters. In general, it’s true that no one has bars that all the same height Some people are good at some things and not so terrific at other things

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Universal Design for Learning , Differentiation, RtI Region 4 PD Leads


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Universal Design for Learning, Differentiation, RtIRegion 4 PD Leads

    2. Graphing Me

    3. Why it Matters • In general, it’s true that no one has bars that all the same height • Some people are good at some things and not so terrific at other things • What does FAIR mean? Everyone doesn’t always get the same. Everyone gets what he or she needs! • One size fits all instruction does not address the needs of many students • Kids come in different shapes and sizes as well as interests, learning profiles, and readiness levels

    4. Why it Matters • In general, it’s true that no one has bars that are all the same height • Some people are good at some things and not so terrific at other things • What does FAIR mean? Everyone doesn’t always get the same. Everyone gets what he or she needs!

    5. Serving All is a Process

    6. Individualized Instruction

    7. Universal Design for Learning

    8. Universal Design

    9. UniversalDesignfor Learning (UDL) is Universal Design for Learning (UDL) A set of principles for curriculum development that applies to the general education curriculum to promote learning environments that meet the needs of all learners

    10. A Different Way http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDvKnY0g6e4

    11. Meeting the Needs of ALL Learners

    12. Universal Design

    13. UDL UDL Principles

    14. Principle I: Multiple Means of Representation: The what of learning • To give diverse learners options for acquiring information and knowledge • Present content in a variety of formats and modalities

    15. Manipulatives Visual Displays Anticipatory Guides Graphic Organizers Artifacts Videos Music Movement Text Readers UDL requires:Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Representation

    16. Principle II: Multiple Means of Action and Expression: Judy Augatti

    17. UDL requires:Multiple Means of Action and Expression and • Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down • Gallery Walks • Pair/Share • Chalkboard/Whiteboard Splash • Response Hold-Up Cards • Quick Draws • Numbered Heads Together • Line-Ups

    18. Principle III: Multiple Means of Engagement Taps into learners’ interests, offers appropriate challenges, and increases

    19. UDL requires:Multiple Means of Engagement • Bounce Cards • Air Writing • Case Studies • Role Plays • Concept Charades • Response Hold-Up Cards • Networking Sessions • Simulations

    20. With UDL more students are: Achieving Motivated • Engaged • Learning

    21. Differentiated Instruction

    22. Differentiated Instruction Discover your learning style Complete the online survey: http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/mi/w1_interactive1.html Learning Styles Inventory Test: http://www.berghuis.co.nz/abiator/lsi/lsitest2.html Learning Styles Test: http://faculty.ucc.edu/business-greenbaum/LearningStlyes.htm Multiple Intelligences: http://www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks3/ict/multiple_int/index.htm

    23. Why Differentiate? • One size fits all instruction does not address the needs of many students • Kids come in different shapes and sizes as well as interests, learning profiles, and readiness levels.

    24. How We Learn Some kids who continually are doing what they already know are just marching in place. Let’s take a look at how we learn…

    25. What does all this mean? Two adverse conditions are dangerous: • Anxiety – when we expect too much • Boredom – when we expect too little

    26. When & Why When do we differentiate? • When some work is too hard or too easy • Change the degree of difficulty not necessarily the learning goal Why do we differentiate? • Student variance (one size doesn’t fit all) • Professionalism (adapt what we know to the kids we serve)

    27. What does a differentiated classroom look like?

    28. Providing a “Rack of Learning Options” • We need to do more than “tailor the same suit of clothes” • Differentiation requires thoughtful planning and proactive approaches

    29. Students participate in a "Dump your Brain" activity.

    30. Preschool children can “Dump their Brain” in a modified way: Show me all the ways we can make “three.” three 3 + =

    31. A-B-C Books Basic Differentiated Create a higher level A-B-C book based on Q is for Duck to demonstrate understanding of a unit or concept. For example, A is for weather. Our weather takes place in the atmosphere. • Create a traditional A-B-C book to demonstrate understanding of a unit or concept

    32. Product Guides Student choice is KEY! Students work in the learning style that suits them best. Students work at a comfortable level of readiness.

    33. Some important strategies for students: Tiered Lessons Cubing Anchor Activities

    34. Anchor Activity • An ANCHOR ACTIVITY is a strategy that allows students to work on an outgoing assignment directly related to the curriculum that can be worked on independently throughout a unit or semester.  An anchor activity is a logical extension of learnign during a unit, an elaboration of important goals and outcomes that are tied to the curriculum and tasks for which students are held accountable. • The purpose of an anchor activity is to provide meaningful work for students when they are not actively engaged in classroom activities.

    35. Anchor Activities Can be: • Used in any subject • Whole class assignments • Small group or individual assignments • Tiered to meet the needs of different readiness levels • Interdisciplinary for use across content areas or teams

    36. Tiered Instruction “When somebody hands you a glob of kids, they don’t hand you a matched set.” ~Carol Tomlinson • Provides teachers with a means of assigning different tasks within the same lesson or unit • The tasks will vary according to: • Readiness • Interest • Learning Profile

    37. What Is Tiered Instruction? • “Tiered instruction is like a wedding cake; all one flavor, same color icing but multi-layered”

    38. Cubing Offer a different task at varying degrees of difficulty on each side of the cube. or...

    39. Cubing Provide activities dealing with the same topic at tiered degrees of difficulty by cube OR by learning style (kinesthetic, visual, oral). Level 1 Level 2 Level 3