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F.E.C. Theory: understanding how adult learners learn. Michele Pinnock Cluster 30 ITDE. Introduction. This proposed theory seeks to explain how mature entry student-teachers learn.

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introduction
Introduction

This proposed theory seeks to explain how mature entry student-teachers learn.

This theory seeks to conceptualize learning and to describe the environment in which it is to occur, in a bid to guarantee meaningful learning.

how do mature learners learn
How do Mature LearnersLEARN ?

FOCUS

EXAMINE

CONNECT

The learner will FOCUS after being stimulated by the environment, causing neurones in the brain to be stimulated.

This will cause the brain to EXAMINE the just arrived knowledge in order to interpret and identify congruence and dissonance with their existing network.

The learner will then CONNECT this new information with existing information or make adjustments to existing information.

components of f e c
Components of F.E.C
  • LEARNERS
  • AUTHENTIC LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
  • METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES
  • PROVIDE SUPPORT
implications of fec theory on instruction
Implications of FEC theory onInstruction

To guarantee learning, create learning communities that enhance learners’ metacognition skills by engaging them in meaningful learning.

this theory recognizes learners
This Theory Recognizes LEARNERS
  • Learners are unique
  • That they must be actively involved in constructing their own meaning and
  • that they must be made conscious of their metacognition.

Empirical evidence

Directed Perception’ by Minturn & Bruner

Students were given sequences of either letter or numbers to look at. When given ambiguous set participants interpreted the number according to their expectations of their ‘set’

this theory recognizes authentic environment
This Theory Recognizes AUTHENTIC ENVIRONMENT

The learning environment must mirror the real world in order for learners to be able to recognize the significance and relevance of this new knowledge to be learnt.

this theory recognizes metacognition as key
This Theory Recognizes METACOGNITION as KEY

Metacognition is one’s awareness of thinking and the self-regulatory that accompanies this awareness. Here learners will

  • have to classify their knowledge- what they know and what they don’t.
  • Talk about thinking (probably in pairs)
  • Planning and self-regulation
  • Debriefing the thinking process
  • Self evaluation
this theory recognizes the need to provide support
This Theory Recognizes the need to PROVIDE SUPPORT

Support in the form of experts whether they be instructors and or peers. These persons will demonstrate through mentoring, modeling and or coaching the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed to succeed. Thus they help to create a learning community.

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Operationalizing the

FEC Theory of Learning

STANDARDS

Learning Environment

METACOGNITION

Self-

Confidence

Experiences

Perception

Capabilities

Learner

AUTHENTIC LEARNING

SUPPORT

references
References

Baron, P. (2001). Psychology.5th Ed. Needham Heights,MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Berk, L. (1994). Child development.3rd Ed. Needham Heights,MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Driscoll, M. (2000). Psychology of learning for instruction 2nd Ed. Allyn & Bacon

Eggen, P. & Kauchak, D. (1997). Educational psychology: windows on classrooms

3rd Ed. UpperSaddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Gagne, E., Yekovich, C. & Yekovich, F. (1993). The cognitive psychology of

school learning. 2nd Ed. New York: HarperCollins.

Neisser, U. (1967). Cognitive psychology. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

Siegler, R. (1981). Children’s thinking 2nd Ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice

Hall.

Thomson, D. & Tulving, E. (1970). Associative encoding and retrieval: Weak a

strong cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology,86,255-262.

Tulving, E. (1979). Relation between encoding specificity and level of processing .

In L. Cremak & F. Craik (Eds.), Levels of processing and human memory.

Hillsdale, NJ:Erlbaum.

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