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Session 1. Course 605 and 606. Basic Brain: Hands together Amygdala : Developmental decision making ability. Safety First: Upside-down brain story (Criminals). Connected Kids Learn. The dreaded AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION!. Going Back in Time.

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connected kids learn
Basic Brain: Hands together
  • Amygdala: Developmental decision making ability.
  • Safety First: Upside-down brain story (Criminals)
Connected Kids Learn
the dreaded audience participation
The dreaded

AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION!

Going Back in Time

engaged kids have no opportunity to misbehave
ONLY 25% of all learners are true auditory learners
    • 50% of all High School teachers come from this population.
    • So how do they teach???
Engaged kids have no opportunity to misbehave
where am i and what have i done
Back to Back

Pair and share: 10 things about your new partner.

Dr humor

Circles of Learning: What are they and why do we use them?

Where am I and what have I done?
house keeping
Assignments: What, where, & how!
  • Start time negotiable: What would we like to do to make sure we all get here on time?
  • Get out of your comfort zone.
    • Spelling is NOT an indication of intelligence!
  • Side bar conversations: 1 deaf ear makes it tough for me to hear!
  • Organization of assignments:
    • Neurotic Recommendation
House keeping
historical perspective of special education legislation handout
Federal Law: 94-142 Becomes IDEA 1990
    • Now IDEA 2004 : Revised every 5 years
  • Sate Law Chapter 89 : 1973
    • NOW Chapter 115 (Act 258 in 2006)
  • Rehabilitation Act of 1973
    • NOW ADA
    • Section 504
Historical perspective of special education legislation: Handout
basic tenets fape and lre
FAPE
      • Free and Appropriate Education
  • LRE
    • Least Restrictive Environment
  • 605 Course Handout
Basic tenets: FAPE and LRE
iep team memberships roles and responsibilities
General Overview
  • POP QUIZ: is a school psychologist required to be at an IEP team meeting?
  • Required members
    • Special Education Teacher
    • Regular Education Teacher
    • Parent (or Child if age 18 or older)
    • Local Education Agency Representative (LEA Rep)
IEP Team memberships: roles and responsibilities
major iep components eligibility program and placement
General Overview
  • Nitti Gritty LAW PI 11 Administrative Rule
    • Group 1 SLD/ EBD
    • Group 2 CD
    • Group 3 SL/SDD
    • Group 4 Autism
Major IEP components: eligibility, program and placement
why change
Definition of Cognitive disabilities needs to be updatedWhy Change?
  • Drops the artificial separation by intellectual level (mild, moderate,severe or profound) and considers the child as a whole
why change1
Strengthens the need to assess individual adaptive behavior areas rather than a reliance on one over all adaptive behavior scoreWhy Change?
  • Strengthens the need to assess the individual academic areas rather than grade level measurement
  • Assists the IEP team in program planning for the child
definition
Cognitive disability means:DEFINITION
  • significantly sub-average intellectual functioning
  • that exists concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior
  • and that adversely affects educational performance.
assumptions
Valid assessment considers cultural and linguistic diversity as well as differences in communication and behavioral factorsAssumptions
assumptions1
The deficits in adaptive behaviors occurs within the context of community environments typical of the individual’s age peersAssumptions
assumptions2
Specific adaptive behavior deficits often coexist with strengths in other adaptive behaviors or other personal capabilitiesAssumptions
assumptions3
With appropriate supports and services over a sustained period, the life functioning of the individual with cognitive disabilities will generally improveAssumptions
eligibility criteria
The IEP team may identify a child as having a cognitive disability if the child meets the criteria specified in PI 11.36 (1) (b) with regards to; Eligibility Criteria
  • Intellectual Functioning
  • Adaptive Behavior
  • Academic Functioning
intellectual functioning
The child has a standard score of 2 or more standard deviations below the mean on a least one individually administered intelligence test developed to assess intellectual functioning. Intellectual Functioning
intellectual functioning1
When evaluating a child, the child has;Intellectual Functioning
  • a standard score between 1 and 2 standard deviations below the mean on at least one individually administered intelligence test
  • the child has been documented as having a cognitive disability in the past
  • The child’s condition is expected to last indefinitely
adaptive behavior
The child has deficits in adaptive behavior:Adaptive Behavior
  • As demonstrated by a standard score of 2 or more standard deviations below the mean on standardized or nationally-normed measures
  • As measured by comprehensive, individual assessments
adaptive behavior1
Assessments include interviews of the parents, tests, and observations of the child in adaptive behavior which are relevant to the child’s ageAdaptive Behavior
adaptive behavior2
Adaptive Behavior to be assessed includes;Adaptive Behavior
  • Communication (relevant for ages 3-21)
  • Self-care (relevant for ages 3-21)
  • Home-living skills (relevant for ages 6-21)
adaptive behavior3
Social skills (relevant for ages 3-21)Adaptive Behavior
  • Appropriate use of resources in the community ( relevant for ages 6-21)
adaptive behavior4
Self-direction (relevant for ages 6-21)Adaptive Behavior
  • Health and Safety (relevant for ages 6-21)
  • Applying academic skills in life (relevant for ages 6-21)
academic functioning
The child is age 3 through 5 and has a standard score of 2 or more standard deviations below the mean on standardized or nationally-normed measures, as measured by comprehensive, individual assessments in at least 2 of the following areas: Academic Functioning
academic functioning1
Academic readinessAcademic Functioning
  • Comprehension of language or communication
  • Motor skills
academic functioning2
The child is age 6 through 21 and has a standard score of 2 or more standard deviations below the mean on standardized or nationally-normed measures, as measured by comprehensive, individual assessments, in;Academic Functioning
  • general information
levels of supports
In the 1992 AAMR definition of CD, levels of

supports are used to reflect intensities of

supports and services necessary for

individuals with CD to become more

independent, productive, and integrated into

the community.

Levels of Supports
slide33
Cognitive disabilities typically manifest before age 18Note
  • An etiology should be determined when possible, so that the IEP team can use this information for program planning
need for special education pi 11 35 3
Need for Special Education[ PI 11.35 (3)]
  • “Disability” means impairment and need
  • for special education
  • Not automatic
need for special education
The IEP team shall identify all of the following:Need for Special Education
  • Needs that cannot be met in regular education as structured
need for special education1
Modifications, if any, in regular education, such as;Need for Special Education
  • Adaptation of content
  • Adaptation of methodology
  • Adaptation of delivery of instruction
need for special education2
Modifications, if any, in regular education, that allow the child:Need for Special Education
  • To access general education curriculum
  • To meet the educational standards that apply to all.
need for special education3
Additions or modifications, if any, not provided in general curriculum, including:Need for Special Education
  • Replacement content
  • Expanded core curriculum
  • Other supports
resources
American Association on Mental Retardation (1992), Mental Retardation, Definition, Classification, and Systems of Supports, Washington D.C., AuthorResources
  • American Association on Mental Retardation (1992), Mental Retardation, Definition, Classification, and Systems of Supports Workbook, Washington D.C., Author
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