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PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON WATER 03 – 04 MAY 2007 AT CAPE TOWN SANITATION IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES FACED BY THE WSAs Prese PowerPoint Presentation
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PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON WATER 03 – 04 MAY 2007 AT CAPE TOWN SANITATION IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES FACED BY THE WSAs Prese

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PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON WATER 03 – 04 MAY 2007 AT CAPE TOWN SANITATION IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES FACED BY THE WSAs Prese - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON WATER 03 – 04 MAY 2007 AT CAPE TOWN SANITATION IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES FACED BY THE WSAs Prese
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  1. PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON WATER 03 – 04 MAY 2007 AT CAPE TOWN SANITATION IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES FACED BY THE WSAs Presented by Mihloti Hetisani Senior General Manager: Local Governance Sub-Department

  2. Contents • Background • National Targets • Backlog figures • Free Basic Services • Challenges faced by WSAs • Typical on-site scenarios of challenges • Strategic Interventions

  3. Background • Provision of basic services is a constitutional mandate • A wide range of sanitation technologies are being implemented in the province and country wide. • Funding mainly through MIG, and dedicated funding for schools and clinic sanitation • The sanitation is implemented by WSAs, NGOs, the Housing Programme etc. • Sanitation related issues are dealt with at CollaCom and the Free Basic Services Coordinating Committee. • Sanitation is about dignity of our communities

  4. National Targets The national targets for achieving universal access in sanitation are: • Eradicate household sanitation backlog by 2010 • Eradicate school sanitation backlog by 2005 • Replace bucket system by 2007 • Eradicate backlogs in clinics by 2007 • School sanitation that is not met is a concern! • The slow pace of clinic sanitationis worrying! • Eradicating water backlog by 2008 is a challenge!

  5. WATER BACKLOGS PER HOUSEHOLDS: 2006/07

  6. SANITATION BACKLOGS PER HOUSEHOLDS: 2006/07

  7. POOR HOUSEHOLDS SERVED WITH FBW: 2006/07

  8. CHALLENGES FACED BY WSAs

  9. Technical capacity of WSA • Institutional inadequacy of Water Services Authorities (WSAs). • Lack of relevant qualifications and experience. • High staff turnover. • Functional organizational structure that can produce credible strategic and operational plans. • Technical capacity for project management, design and implementation

  10. Poor infrastructure • The construction product is of low quality • This result in reduced life span, high operational and maintenance cost of the infrastructure. • This is caused by: • Incompetent service providers (consultants and contractors). • Insufficient project management by WSAs, service providers and sector departments involved. • Municipalities have no quality management system

  11. Insufficient funding • Over reliant on grants • The MIG funding in 2007/08 is about R 921.6 m for provision of all basic infrastructure in Limpopo • MIG (F) = B(75%) + P(15%) + N(5%) + E(5%) + M (0%) • Water Services = 72% of B(75%) = 54% of MIG Allocation • R 497.7 m out of R 921.6 m to be used for water & sanitation. • The backlog in basic sanitation is at 816,758 HH • It will cost about R 3.3 bn to eradicate Sanitation backlog up to basic level of service, viz. VIP (@ R4,000/household). • However, R 2.1 bn required to eradicate a water backlog only. • Greater challenge is funding for new bulk services as well as upgrading, rehabilitation and maintenance of existing sanitation systems, e.g. STW

  12. Inappropriate Sanitation Technologies A wide range of sanitation types are currently being used including but not limited to: • Chemical toilets, • Ordinary pit latrine, • Ventilated improved pit latrine (VIP), • Dehydrating and composting toilets, • Aqua-privies, • Flush toilets with full waterborne system connected to a treatment works or septic tanks.

  13. Inappropriate Sanitation Technologies (Cont.) Any chosen technology need to conform to the following: • Compliance with the set basic level of service. • Affordability to the household. • Low operation and maintenance (O&M) requirements. • The system should be manageable by the local community or households.

  14. Inappropriate Sanitation Technologies (Cont.) • The system should also be sustainable over the long-term. • Improvements to health and hygiene. • Compliance with environmental protection. • Ability of community based contractors to implement.

  15. Coordination & Inadequate information • Sanitation involves multi sectors • Little attention is given on integrated planning • Participation of all role players is proving to be a difficult task • Sanitation issues are usually dealt with on an adhoc basis. • No reliable information for planning (population information, service affordability, etc) • No long term strategic infrastructure plans.

  16. Municipal priorities • No Municipal Infrastructure Investment plans. • Capital budget plans for most municipalities are not responding to current infrastructure pressures. • Inconsistency in IDPs and budget plans • Water Services Development Plans (WSDPs) • Sanitation is commonly low on municipal plans • Most WSDPs do not reflect the importance of proper sanitation

  17. TYPICAL ON-SITE SCENARIOS OF SANITATION INFRASTRUCTURE CHALLENGES

  18. On-site Challenges • Visits to some sanitation sites revealed the specific challenges. • The sites visited include: • Modjadjiskloof in Greater Letaba, • Lenyenye in Greater Tzaneen, • Mhinga in Thulamela, • Giyani Treatment works in Greater Giyani • Modimolle sewer system & Phagameng Ext 8 rural sanitation in Modimolle municipality.

  19. On-site Challenges (Cont.) The following were witnessed and discussed: • Sewage ponds can no longer cope with incoming volume due to population growth • Effluent overflow to rivers especially during peak hours and thereby posing health risk. • Oxidation ponds too close to residential sites causing unbearable smell (pollute the air) • No fences to enforce controlled access into the waste water treatment plants • The ponds are poorly managed and maintained

  20. On-site Challenges (Cont.) • Households in rural areas have different types of sanitation structures. The majority of those that are constructed by households themselves do not meet basic standard. • Some sanitation treatment works particularly in the small towns have exceeded their life span and are therefore continuously dysfunctional. • Other treatment works were designed for the selected few during the time of the apartheid government. They are not coping with the current rapid growth in urban and semi urban areas.

  21. STRATEGIC INTERVENTIONS IN THE IMPLEMENATION OF SANITATION

  22. Strategic Interventions • Support municipalities with the alignment of PGDS; NSDF and IDP; - 8 growth points have been identified in line with PGDS - thus Infrastructure Investment Frameworks would be developed during the 2007/08 financial year. • The Sanitation Symposium has developed action plans that are been refined to form part of the Provincial Water Services Strategic Plan - DLGH is exploring possibilities of importing Sanitation experts from India to assist in fast-tracking sanitation service delivery on various types of technologies such as sulabh flush compost toilet, etc.

  23. Strategic Interventions • Deployment of technical personnel in Municipalities by DPLG,DLGH, DBSA and other institutions through coordinated and organized programmes. - This has resulted in MIG expenditure increasing by 18% from 67.8% in 2005/06 to 85.8% in 2006/07 Financial Year • Continued support and monitoring for functional organograms in municipalities by DLGH. • Sector departments to assist municipalities in: - IDP processes (planning), - Project implementation (BP, design & execution), - Asset management (O & M).

  24. Strategic Interventions • Municipalities to strictly implement performance management systems. • Increase funding levels and more so to good performing WSA in order to reach universal access earlier in those municipalities. • Immediate adoption of sustainable sanitation technologies informed by research and stakeholder participation. • The department has developed a plan to assist 3 Districts and growth points with the development of Municipal Infrastructure Investment Framework - These Investment Plans should also address sanitation

  25. Strategic Interventions • Backlog verified and district profile reflecting backlog status developed by project consolidate unit - This figures are continuously verified & updated by Municipalities & Sector Depts. • Assisted 15 PC municipalities with the analysis of their indigent policies from which a framework is developed • Piloting the development of indigent register in Elias Motsoaledi local municipality • Conducted Free Basic Electricity awareness in all 5 districts

  26. "With our little more effort and commitment, an additional infrastructure can be developed to afford another South African an access to basic services“

  27. THANK YOU