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Week at a Glance. Mon- Test Review and Tempest Tue- Benchmark Wed- Benchmark Thur - Tempest/ Tempest Quiz Friday- Tempest/ Vocab Quiz. Historical Sources of the Tempest. In 1610 a ship bound for Virginia was blown off course and landed in Bermuda

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Week at a Glance


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week at a glance
Week at a Glance
  • Mon- Test Review and Tempest
  • Tue- Benchmark
  • Wed- Benchmark
  • Thur- Tempest/ Tempest Quiz
  • Friday- Tempest/ Vocab Quiz
historical sources of the tempest
Historical Sources of the Tempest
  • In 1610 a ship bound for Virginia was blown off course and landed in Bermuda
  • The surviving sailors returned to England to tell strange tales of a lush island they believed to be haunted by devils
  • In addition, the discussion on what an ideal society would look like according to Gonzalo is based off works of other European philosophers who advocate the democracies of the natives.
  • Probably the last of Shakespeare’s plays he wrote alone- if he existed
  • Some scholars have suggested that Shakespeare wrote Prospero’s last speech as a suggestion of his own retirement
motif magic
Motif: Magic
  • Seventeenth century England was spent of the idea of magic
  • Therefore, we see the distinction between the rational, scientific magic of Prospero compared to the dark, occultic magic of Sycorax
physical attractiveness
Physical Attractiveness
  • Throughout the play discussion on individual morality will be based around physical attraction
  • Caliban is believed to be evil due to his monstrous appearance while Ferdinand is assumed to be good because he is handsome
  • Some, not all, philosophers imagined a relationship between morality and physical attractiveness, citing that God must have liked the person more to give them such looks.
interpretations
Interpretations
  • Triumph of Art over Nature
  • The conflict of civilization and Nature
  • Anti-colonialism and Anti-slavery
  • The creation of worlds through Art
art over nature
Art over Nature
  • In this context Nature is a primitive entity who needs the guide of intelligent beings to control its lesser urges and dangerous impulses.
  • “Caliban” is an example of Nature out of control, that needs to be controlled by Prospero
colonialism
Colonialism
  • Prospero is the master of two servants “Caliban” (whose name likely derives from the word cannibal) and Ariel, a spirit.
  • Note how Propero uses intimidation to keep them in line
  • Also note how he loathes the darker one more so than the lighter one.
art as a creative force
Art as a Creative Force
  • Prospero will frequently refer to his “Art” as the source of his power
  • Many critics believe that Shakespeare wrote Prospero as a contemporary of himself.
  • Shakespeare created worlds, terrible and beautiful, with art
  • He teaches his characters what to speak and gives them purpose in the world
  • The other characters’ actions are choreographed by his plan
themes
Themes
  • The meeting and power of art
  • The discussion on utopia
  • Nature vs Science
  • The question of Free Will
  • Knowledge
knowledge
Knowledge
  • Throughout the play we will compare how the fate of this island to that of the Lord of the Flies
  • Prospero cites his past history as a teacher of Ariel, Miranda, and Caliban
  • Some of the characters take the knowledge and build off of it while some corrupt