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Freshman Orientation & College Study Skills (Traditional vs. Online) PowerPoint Presentation
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Freshman Orientation & College Study Skills (Traditional vs. Online)

Freshman Orientation & College Study Skills (Traditional vs. Online)

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Freshman Orientation & College Study Skills (Traditional vs. Online)

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  1. Freshman Orientation & College Study Skills (Traditional vs. Online) Presented by: Jon Arriola

  2. The Digital Divide We use the term “Digital Divide" to refer to this gap between those who can effectively use new information and communication tools, such as the Internet, and those who cannot. While a consensus does not exist on the extent of the divide (and whether the divide is growing or narrowing), researchers are nearly unanimous in acknowledging that some sort of divide exists at this point in time. (Source: http://www.digitaldividenetwork.org/content/sections/index.cfm?key=2 ; Digital Divide Network, 2004)

  3. The Digital Divide There has always been a gap between those people and communities who can make effective use of information technology and those who cannot. Now, more than ever, unequal adoption of technology excludes many from reaping the fruits of the economy. (Source: http://www.digitaldividenetwork.org/content/sections/index.cfm?key=2 ; Digital Divide Network, 2004)

  4. Digital Divide Basics Fact Sheet: Global Perspective There are an estimated 429 million people online globally and of those 429 million. • 41% are in North America This represents only 6% of the world’s entire population Other facts: • The United States has more computers than the rest of the world combined (Source: First Quarter 2001 Global Internet Trends, Neilsen/Netratings)

  5. Digital Divide Basics Fact Sheet: Global Perspective When assessed by region, Internet use is dominated by North Americans: • 41% of the global online population is in the United States & Canada • 27% of the online population lives in Europe, the Middle East and Africa(25% of European Homes are online) • 20% of the online population logs on from Asia Pacific(33% of all Asian Homes are online) • Only 4% of the world’s online population are in South America (Source: First Quarter 2001 Global Internet Trends, Neilsen/Netratings

  6. Digital Divide Basics Fact Sheet: U.S. Perspective In fall of 2000, the U.S. Department of Commerce found that • 51% of all U.S. homes had a computer • 41.5% of all U.S. homes had Internet access • White (46.1%) and Asian American & Pacific Islander • (56.8%) households continued to have Internet access at levels more than double those of Black (23.5%) and Hispanic (23.6%) households. (Source: Falling Through the Net, 2000, and Digital Divide Network:http://digitaldividenetwork.org/content/stories/index.cfm?key=168, 2004)

  7. Digital Divide Basics Fact Sheet: U.S. Perspective • 86.3% of households earning $75,000 and above per year had Internet access compared to 12.7% of households earning less than $15,000 per year. • Nearly 65% of college graduates have home Internet access • only 11.7% of households headed by persons with less than a high school education have Internet access (Source: Falling Through the Net, 2000, and Digital Divide Network:http://digitaldividenetwork.org/content/stories/index.cfm?key=168, 2004

  8. Digital Divide Basics Fact Sheet: U.S. Perspective Rural areas, though still lagging behind urban areas, had surpassed inner-cities in Internet availability and use: • Urban 42.3 • Rural 38.9 • Central City 37.7 (Source: Falling Through the Net, 2000, and Digital Divide Network:http://digitaldividenetwork.org/content/stories/index.cfm?key=168, 2004

  9. Digital Divide Basics Fact Sheet: U.S. Perspective Of those who use the Internet outside the home • 62.7% do so at work, • 18.9% at K-12 schools • 8.3% in other school settings, • 9.6% at libraries • .5% at Community Centers • 13.8% use someone else’s computer (Source: Falling Through the Net, 2000, and Digital Divide Network:http://digitaldividenetwork.org/content/stories/index.cfm?key=168, 2004

  10. Community College Faculty • Constitute 31% of all U.S. Higher education faculty • Teaching 39% of all higher education students • 46% of all first-year students Source: http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/ccs/digests/dig0210.htm

  11. The Uses of Technology in Community Colleges • Support of Learning • Support of College Administration • The Challenges of Acquiring, Integrating and Using Technology

  12. Support of Learning • E-mail • Immediate availability of information resources on the World Wide Web • Assist students in need of developmental education • Dramatically extend the reach of the community colleges

  13. Support of College Administration • Enhanced communication • Course management • Integration of HR • Registration • Financial aid • Track the use of student support services - counseling and tutoring

  14. The Challenges of Acquiring, Integrating and Using Technology • The Cost of Technology • The Digital Divide • Policy Issues Related to Technology

  15. The Cost of Technology • Hardware and software developers offer technological solutions that often are not cost-efficient or even functional • Administrators must shift from focusing on specific technological solutions to a broader conversation about knowledge management • Investment in technology can repay itself through institutional transformation

  16. The Digital Divide • Urban community colleges tend to be better wired than their rural counterparts • Rural areas of the country are being left behind • Lack of adequate funding for technological infrastructure

  17. Policy Issues Related to Technology • The right to privacy in electronic communication • Intellectual property questions (including ownership of electronically-delivered courses) • The impact of technology on faculty workload • Raising of student fees to offset cost

  18. Policies and Procedures of Tyler Junior College Career Services Study Skills Time Management Support Services Policies and Procedures of Tyler Junior College Career Services Study Skills Time Management Support Services (FO) Topics Discussed: Traditional vs. Online

  19. Registration and Advisement Procedures and Options Advising and Testing Services Key Offices and Personnel on Campus Cultural, Civic, and Social Activities Resources of the College Registration and Advisement Procedures and Options Advising and Testing Services Key Offices and Personnel on Campus Cultural, Civic, and Social Activities Resources of the College (FO) Topics Discussed: Traditional vs. Online

  20. Instructional and Extracurricular Activities Drug Misuse and Abuse Student Organizations and Activities Crisis Intervention and Community Referral Services Instructional and Extracurricular Activities Drug Misuse and Abuse Student Organizations and Activities Crisis Intervention and Community Referral Services (FO) Topics Discussed: Traditional vs. Online

  21. TSI Testing Requirements Occupational Outlook Handbook Appropriate Classroom Behavior Organizational Structure and Academic Schools of the College Appeal and Grievance Procedures TSI Testing Requirements Occupational Outlook Handbook Appropriate Classroom Behavior Organizational Structure and Academic Schools of the College Appeal and Grievance Procedures (FO) Topics Discussed: Traditional vs. Online

  22. Setting goals Time Management Managing Stress/Test Anxiety Memory Taking Notes/Reading Setting goals Time Management Managing Stress/Test Anxiety Memory Taking Notes/Reading (CSS) Topics Discussed:Traditional Online

  23. Thinking Visually Decision Making/Problem Solving Test Taking Skills Communicating Thinking Visually Decision Making/Problem Solving Test Taking Skills Communicating (CSS) Topics Discussed:Traditional Online

  24. Diversity Health Using School Resources Change Career Diversity Health Using School Resources Change Career (CSS) Topics Discussed:Traditional Online

  25. TASK: POINTVALUES: Treasure Hunt Worksheet 5 Library Tour Verification Worksheet 5 Academic Advising Worksheet 5 TASK:POINT VALUES: WebCT Tutorial 20 Deans, Schools, and Advisors 5 Academic Advising and Testing 5 (FO) Grading Procedure: Traditional vs. Online

  26. Student Handbook Worksheet 5 First Two LRC Assignments 10 THEA Worksheet 5 HPE Center Tour Worksheet 5 College Regulations 20 Explore a Degree 20 Financial Aid 20 Postings 20 (FO) Grading Procedure: Traditional vs. Online

  27. GPA Worksheet 5 Second Two LRC Assignments 10 Career Info Worksheet 5 Final Exam 40 This comes to a total of 100 points Attendance 15 Test 10 This comes to a total of 135 points. (FO) Grading Procedure: Traditional vs. Online

  28. COURSE GRADE = TOTAL POINTS A= 90-100 B=80- 89 C=70-79 D=60-69 F=59 and below COURSE GRADE = TOTAL POINTS A 135 - 125 B 124 - 115 C 114 - 105 D 104 - 95 F 94 - 0 (FO) The breakdown of the grading scale : Traditional vs. Online

  29. Attendance 20 pts Participation 15 pts Tests 15 pts Project 50 pts Exercises 10 pts Participation 25 pts Tests 10 pts Assignment #1 15 pts Assignment #2 15 pts Assignment #3 15 pts Journal 10 pts (CSS) Grading Procedure:Traditional Online

  30. Must be collected Reading time lengthy Grading is time consuming Passed back to the class Physically place in the grade book Less efficient Automatically collected Reading time shorter Grading time is cut in half Never need passing back Automatically placed into grade book More efficient (FO) Grading Assignments: Traditional vs. Online

  31. Must be collected Given to Instructor if late Grading is time consuming Passed back to the class Put in the grade book Automatically collected Received by program Grading time is cut in half Never need passing back Automatically placed into grade book (CSS) Grading Assignments: Traditional vs. Online

  32. Fit course to student’s schedule Courses limited to space Courses take up real estate from other major classes Course can be taken at student’s leisure Course limits raised due to experience of Instructor Opens up real estate for other major classes (FO & CSS) Availability: Traditional vs. Online

  33. Fixed cost/student (Hourly) No extra charge to student 8 wk. course –space unused for 2nd 8 wks. Fixed cost/student (Hourly) Extra charges for lab, CDs, etc. 8 wk. course—can be taught 2nd 8 wks and not use up real estate (FO & CSS) Bottom Line: Traditional vs. Online

  34. Time consuming More paper work More real estate used Student satisfaction Taught at specific time Convenient-because it is familiar Time consuming but more efficient Less paper work No real estate used Taught at any time Extremely convenient Conclusion: Traditional vs. Online

  35. Conclusion • Technology acquisition and implementation brings challenges as well as benefits “Although technological innovations are exciting, we must remember that technology is a tool—one that should help our lives, not rule them.” Source: Transue, P J.  (2001).  The big box:  Looking back on technology. Community College Journal, 72(2), 6. http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/ccs/digests/digest0309.htm