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Maximum Flow. c. v. 3 / 3. 4 / 6. 1 / 1. t. 4 / 7. 3 / 3. s. w. 1 / 9. 3 / 5. 1 / 1. 3 / 5. z. u. 2 / 2. Outline and Reading. Flow networks Flow ( § 8.1.1) Cut ( § 8.1.2) Maximum flow Augmenting path ( § 8.2.1) Maximum flow and minimum cut ( § 8.2.1)

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Maximum Flow


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    1. Maximum Flow c v 3/3 4/6 1/1 t 4/7 3/3 s w 1/9 3/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 Maximum Flow

    2. Outline and Reading • Flow networks • Flow (§8.1.1) • Cut (§8.1.2) • Maximum flow • Augmenting path (§8.2.1) • Maximum flow and minimum cut (§8.2.1) • Ford-Fulkerson’s algorithm (§8.2.2-8.2.3) • Edmonds-Karp algorithm (§8.2.4) • Maximum Bipartite Matching • Minimum Cost Flow (§8.4) Maximum Flow

    3. v 3 6 1 t 7 3 s w 9 5 1 5 z u 2 Flow Network • A flow network (or just network) N consists of • A weighted digraph G with nonnegative integer edge weights, where the weight of an edge e is called the capacity c(e) of e • Two distinguished vertices, s and t of G, called the source and sink, respectively, such that s has no incoming edges and t has no outgoing edges. • Example: Maximum Flow

    4. v 1/3 2/6 1/1 t 3/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 1/1 3/5 z u Flow • A flow f for a network N is is an assignment of an integer value f(e) to each edge e that satisfies the following properties: Capacity Rule: For each edge e, 0 f (e) c(e) Conservation Rule: For each vertex v  s,twhere E-(v) and E+(v) are the incoming and outgoing edges of v, resp. • The value of a flow f , denoted |f|, is the total flow from the source, which is the same as the total flow into the sink • Example: 2/2 Maximum Flow

    5. Maximum Flow v 1/3 2/6 • A flow for a network N is said to be maximum if its value is the largest of all flows for N • The maximum flow problem consists of finding a maximum flow for a given network N • Applications • Hydraulic systems • Electrical circuits • Traffic movements • Freight transportation 1/1 t 3/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 Flow of value 8 = 2 + 3 + 3 = 1 + 3 + 4 v 3/3 4/6 1/1 t 3/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 Maximum flow of value 10 = 4 + 3 + 3 = 3 + 3 + 4 Maximum Flow

    6. c v 3 6 1 t 7 3 s w 9 5 1 5 z u 2 c v 1/3 2/6 1/1 t 3/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 Cut • A cut of a network N with source s and sink t is a partition c= (Vs,Vt) of the vertices of N such that sVsandtVt • Forward edge of cut c: origin in Vsand destination inVt • Backward edge of cut c: origin in Vtand destination inVs • Flow f(c) across a cut c: total flow of forward edges minus total flow of backward edges • Capacity c(c) of a cut c: total capacity of forward edges • Example: • c(c) = 24 • f(c) = 8 f(c)= 2 –1 + 3 + 2 + 2 = 8 Maximum Flow

    7. Flow and Cut Lemma: The flow f(c) across any cut c is equal to the flow value |f| Lemma: The flow f(c) across a cut c is less than or equal to the capacity c(c) of the cut Theorem: The value of any flow is less than or equal to the capacity of any cut, i.e., for any flow f and any cut c, we have|f| c(c) c1 c2 v 1/3 2/6 1/1 t 3/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 |f| = 8 c(c1) = 6 + 3 + 1 + 2 = 12 c(c2) = 3 + 7 + 9 + 2 = 21 Maximum Flow

    8. p v 1/3 2/6 1/1 t 2/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 0/1 2/5 z u 2/2 Augmenting Path • Consider a flow f for a network N • Let e be an edge from u to v: • Residual capacity of forward edge e, from u to v: Df(u, v) = c(e) -f (e) • Residual capacity of backward edge e, from v to u: Df(v, u) = f (e) • Let p be a path from s to t • The residual capacity Df(p) ofpis the smallest of the residual capacities of the edges of p • A path p from s to t is an augmenting path if Df(p) > 0 Df(s,u) = 3 Df(u,w) = 1 Df(w,v) = 1 Df(v,t) = 2 Df(p) = 1 |f| = 7 Maximum Flow

    9. p v 1/3 2/6 1/1 t 2/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 0/1 2/5 z u 2/2 p v 2/3 2/6 0/1 t 2/7 3/3 s w 2/9 4/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 Flow Augmentation Lemma: Let p be an augmenting path for flow f in network N. There exists a flow f for N of value| f| = |f | +Df(p) Proof: We compute flow f by modifying the flow on the edges of p • Forward edge:f(e) = f(e) + Df(p) • Backward edge:f(e) = f(e) - Df(p) | f| = 7 Df(p) = 1 | f| = 8 Maximum Flow

    10. Ford-Fulkerson’s Algorithm AlgorithmFordFulkersonMaxFlow(N) for all e  G.edges() setFlow(e, 0) whileGhas an augmenting path p { compute residual capacity D of p } D for all edgese  p { compute residual capacity d of e } ife is a forward edge of p dgetCapacity(e) - getFlow(e) else{ e is a backward edge } dgetFlow(e) ifd<D D d { augment flow along p } for all edgese  p ife is a forward edge of p setFlow(e, getFlow(e) + D) else{ e is a backward edge } setFlow(e, getFlow(e) - D) • Initially, f(e) = 0 for each edge e • Repeatedly • Search for an augmenting path p • Augment by Df(p) the flow along the edges of p • A specialization of DFS (or BFS) searches for an augmenting path • An edge e is traversed from u to v provided Df(u, v) > 0 Maximum Flow

    11. Max-Flow and Min-Cut Theorem: The value of a maximum flow is equal to the capacity of a minimum cut • Termination of Ford-Fulkerson’s algorithm • There is no augmenting path from s to t with respect to the current flow f • Define Vs set of vertices reachable from s by augmenting paths Vt set of remaining vertices • Cut c= (Vs,Vt) has capacityc(c) =|f| • Forward edge: f(e) = c(e) • Backward edge: f(e) = 0 • Thus, flow f has maximum value and cut c has minimum capacity c v 3/3 4/6 1/1 t 4/7 3/3 s w 1/9 3/5 1/1 3/5 z u 2/2 c(c)=| f | = 10 Maximum Flow

    12. v v 0/3 0/3 0/6 1/6 0/1 1/1 t t 1/7 2/7 0/3 1/3 s s w w 0/9 0/5 0/9 1/5 1/1 0/1 1/5 1/5 z z u u 0/2 1/2 v v 0/3 1/3 0/6 1/6 0/1 0/1 t t 1/7 2/7 1/3 2/3 s s w w 0/9 1/5 0/9 1/5 0/1 0/1 1/5 1/5 z z u u 1/2 1/2 Example (1) Maximum Flow

    13. v 3/3 v 3/3 3/6 4/6 0/1 1/1 t t 2/7 3/7 2/3 s 3/3 s w w 0/9 1/5 1/9 2/5 0/1 0/1 1/5 1/5 z u z u 1/2 1/2 two steps v v 3/3 3/3 3/6 4/6 0/1 1/1 t t 2/7 4/7 3/3 3/3 s s w w 1/9 2/5 1/9 3/5 0/1 1/1 1/5 3/5 z z u u 1/2 2/2 Example (2) Maximum Flow

    14. v 0/50 1/50 s 1/1 t p1 1/50 0/50 u v 1/50 1/50 s 0/1 t p2 1/50 1/50 u Analysis • In the worst case, Ford-Fulkerson’s algorithm performs |f*| flow augmentations, where f* is a maximum flow • Example • The augmenting paths found alternate between p1 and p2 • The algorithm performs 100 augmentations • Finding an augmenting path and augmenting the flow takes O(n + m) time • The running time of Ford-Fulkerson’s algorithm is O(|f*|(n + m)) Maximum Flow

    15. Edmonds-Karp Algorithm • Variation of Ford-Fulkerson’s algorithm • Uses a simple technique for finding good augmenting path in faster running time. • It is more greedy in the choice of path • Chooses an augmenting path p with the smallest number of edges • This can be done in O(m) by a modified BFS traversal • Complexity O(n m2) • Lemma:The number of flow augmentations in the Edmonds-Karp algorithm for a network with n vertices and m edges is no more than n m. Maximum Flow

    16. M=2 M=1 V1 V2 Maximum Bipartite Matching • Graph G(V,E) is bipartite (denoted G(V1,V2,E) ) if • The vertices V of G can be partitioned into two disjoint sets, V1 and V2 • Every edge e of G has one endpoint in V1 and the other in V2. • A matching in G is a set of edges (subset of E) that have no endpoints in common. A matching in bipartite graph is called bipartite matching. • We are often interested in maximum matching, that is, the matching with maximum number of edges. Maximum Flow

    17. V1 V2 Maximum Bipartite Matching • Solution is non-unique • Examples: (all are maximum, M=2) Maximum Flow

    18. V1 V2 t s Reduction to Max Flow Problem • Systematic approach to bipartite matching problem • Create a network flowN from graph G(V1,V2,E): • Add a source s and a sink t • Connect s withV1 and t with V2, using directed edges • Direct edges E from V1to V2 and assign capacities c(e)=1 • Solve a max flow problem on the network flow N • maxM = max f Maximum Flow

    19. V1 V2 t s Reduction to Max Flow Problem • Proof of correctness • f(e) = 1 e M • Set M is a matching: • The flow through e is 0 or 1 (capacity is 1) • Each vertex in V1 has exactly one incoming edge: by flow conservation rule there is at most one outgoing edge for v V1 • Each vertex in V2 has exactly one outgoing edge: there is at most one incoming edge for v V2 • Hence, each vertex in V1 will be paired in M by at most one vertex in V2 ., hence M is the matching. • Finally, size of M = |f|. Maximum Flow

    20. Minimum Cost Flow Problem • A variant of the max flow problem, applicable to networks where there is a costw(e) associated with sending a unit flow through an edge. • Associate cost w(e) with each edge e in the network N • Compute flow f with minimum total cost: min w(f) = e  E w(e) f(e) • That is, find a minimum-cost flow among all the flows of maximum valuef • Sometimes, given a fixed flow f, compute minimum-cost flow with flow value = f. • Solving min-cost flow uses augmented cycles concept. Maximum Flow

    21. u 1 / 2, 1 1 / 1, 3 s 0 / 3,1 t 1 / 2, 1 1 / 1, 3 v u 0 / 1, 3 1 / 2, 1 s 0/1 t p2 2 / 2, 1 1/ 1, 3 v Minimum Cost Flow Problem f(e) / c(e),w(e) • Augmenting cycle  : a cycle that has non-zero residual capacity Df() • Residual capacity Df() along the cycle  : min of • c(e)-f(e) for forward edges • f(e)>0 for backward edges • Example: • Initially f=2 and w(f)=8 • Augmenting cycle {s,v,u,s} has residual capacity Df() = 1. • The cost of  is w()=-1 • Flow f’ obtained by pushing 1 unit of flow along has cost: w(f’) = w(f) + w( ) Df() = 8 - 1= 7 Maximum Flow