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HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT IN AMERICA: What Do We Know? PowerPoint Presentation
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HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT IN AMERICA: What Do We Know?

HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT IN AMERICA: What Do We Know?

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HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT IN AMERICA: What Do We Know?

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  1. HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT IN AMERICA:What Do We Know? Iowa High School Summit The Education Trust December, 2004

  2. What Do We Know About Student Achievement?

  3. 12th Grade Achievement In Math and Science is Up Somewhat

  4. High School Achievement: Math and Science: NAEP Long-Term Trends Source: NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress.

  5. In Reading, 12th Grade Achievement is Headed Downward

  6. HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT: READING AND WRITINGNAEP Long-Term Trends

  7. What about different groups of students?

  8. Gaps Narrow 1970-88NAEP Reading 17 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  9. Gaps Narrow 1973-86NAEP Math Scores, 13 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  10. Between 1988-90, that progress came to a halt…and gaps began to widen once again.

  11. Gaps Narrow Then Mostly Widen Reading, 17 Year-OldsNAEP Long-Term Trends 21 31 Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  12. Gaps Narrow, Then Hold Steady or Widen: Math, 17 Year-OldsNAEP Long-Term Trends 32 20 Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  13. How much learning takes place at each level?

  14. Students Make More Growth Grade 5 to 8 than Grade 9 to 12

  15. Academic GrowthGrades 5-8, 9-12

  16. Value Added in High School Declined During the Nineties

  17. Value Added Declining in High School Math... Age 13-17 Growth Source: NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress

  18. …Still Age 13-17 Growth Source: Main NAEP 1996, 2000

  19. Reading: Students Entering Better Prepared, But Leaving Worse Source: NAEP 1996 Trends in Academic Progress

  20. Hormones?

  21. Students in Other Countries Gain far More in Middle and High School

  22. TIMSS

  23. Source: NCES 1999-081R, Highlights From TIMSS

  24. Source: NCES 1999-081R, Highlights From TIMSS

  25. PISA

  26. US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near Middle Of The Pack Among 32 Participating Countries

  27. One measure on which we rank high?Inequality!

  28. Performance Of U.S.15 Year-Olds Highly Variable *Of 27 OECD countries Source: OECD, Knowledge and Skills for Life: First Results From PISA 2000, 2001.

  29. These gaps evident when children arrive at school.

  30. By Race, Ethnicity NAEP 4th Grade Reading 2003 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

  31. But they grow wider the longer students remain in school.By end of high school?

  32. African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Do Math at Same Levels As White 13 Year Olds Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

  33. African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Read at Same Levels as White 13 Year Olds Source: Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

  34. And these are the students who remain in school.

  35. Students Graduate From High School At Different Rates, 2001 Source: Jay P. Greene and Greg Forster, “Public High School Graduation and College Readiness Rates in the United States,” Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, September 2003.

  36. Iowa?

  37. IA By Race, Ethnicity NAEP 4th Grade Reading 2003 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

  38. IA By Race, Ethnicity NAEP 8th Grade Math 2003 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

  39. White 8th Graders: NAEP Math

  40. Latino 8th Graders: NAEP Math

  41. Black 8th Graders? NAEP MATH

  42. Low Income 8th Graders? NAEP MATH

  43. Latinos: 8th Grade Reading

  44. African Americans: 8th Grade Reading

  45. High School and Beyond?

  46. Upper Level Course Taking: IA vs. Top States

  47. Iowa ACT Score Trend

  48. Iowa ACT Takers Meeting College Readiness Benchmarks, 2004

  49. Percent of Iowa Students Taking ACT, 2004

  50. IOWA Promoting Power: 9th Graders Who Graduate with a Diploma 4 Years Later